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Bringing dinghies ashore Bournemouth/Poole

blackbeard

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17 May 2003
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Hampshire
A couple of unfamiliar experiences recently:
We brought some sailing dinghies ashore on Bournemouth beach for a cafe stop, as we have often done before, and were politely asked to leave. I don't know the reason for this, maybe inexpertly handled boats plus a dense population on the beach is a recipe for disaster, but on this occasion there were not so many people on the beach. Apparently anchoring-off (and, presumably, swimming ashore) would have been OK. Does anyone know what, and why, the rules are?
A somewhat similar experience at Shipstal Point in Poole harbour (it's on the Arne peninsula, which is a nature reserve). Apparently we should have known, but I couldn't find anything relevant on the Poole Harbour web site. I can't think of anything we were doing which would have bothered the local wildlife. The warden seemed to think this was a harbour-wide restriction. Does anyone actually know?
 

alahol2

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22 Apr 2004
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Portchester, Solent
We've been visiting Shipstal Point and coming ashore in a dinghy for the last 40 years and never been challenged. We've also landed at many other points around Poole harbour without hindrance. I think you must have met a couple of 'jobsworths'.
 

matt8442

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26 Aug 2018
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Poole
I think Bournemouth beach is a no go for anyone wishing to bring a tender or dinghy ashore, they have yellow seasonal buoys to designate this. Think the only exception is the Cadbury’s ice cream boat that occasionally comes in playing the benny hill music. I remember the RNLI asking people coming ashore to move on elsewhere.
 

Boathook

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Surrey & boat in Dorset. Both have pubs
I think Bournemouth beach is a no go for anyone wishing to bring a tender or dinghy ashore, they have yellow seasonal buoys to designate this. Think the only exception is the Cadbury’s ice cream boat that occasionally comes in playing the benny hill music. I remember the RNLI asking people coming ashore to move on elsewhere.
In the past the yellow buoys have indicated a 5 knot maximum speed limit and used all over the Dorset coast. Normally swimming only areas are indicated by smaller yellow float style buoys between the bigger ones.
 

matt8442

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Poole
In the past the yellow buoys have indicated a 5 knot maximum speed limit and used all over the Dorset coast. Normally swimming only areas are indicated by smaller yellow float style buoys between the bigger ones.
Not quite sure that’s the purpose of these ones, as regardless of doing 5 knots or faster, I’ve always been told not to go past them towards the beach, but I’m no expert, so if that’s the case then so be it. 👍
 

penfold

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On the Clyde
The guidelines for Bornmuff beach say dinghies and other unpowered craft only between black and white flags.

rnlibornmuff.jpg
 

JumbleDuck

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SW Scotland
I think Bournemouth beach is a no go for anyone wishing to bring a tender or dinghy ashore, they have yellow seasonal buoys to designate this. Think the only exception is the Cadbury’s ice cream boat that occasionally comes in playing the benny hill music. I remember the RNLI asking people coming ashore to move on elsewhere.
From what I have seen, strutting around and barking orders without any actual authority is SOP for RNLI lifeguards ...
 

TLouth7

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24 Sep 2016
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Edinburgh
It appears that local authorities have the power to create byelaws to restrict access by watercraft to bathing areas. This would prevent you getting from your yacht to the beach in your tender, though perhaps once you had landed and pulled the tender ashore they would no longer apply?

Local authorities may also make bye-laws banning vessels from areas reserved for bathing at certain times under section 231(1)(f) of the Public Health Act 1936, as amended: 231 Byelaws with respect to public bathing

(1) A local authority may make byelaws with respect to public bathing, and may by such byelaws—

(a) regulate the areas in which, and the hours during which, public bathing shall be permitted; [(aa) prohibit or restrict public bathing at times when and places as respects which warning is given, by the display of flags or by other means specified in the byelaws, that bathing is dangerous;]

(b) fix the places at which bathing-machines may be stationed, or bathing huts or tents may be erected;

(c) regulate the manner in which bathing-machines, huts or tents may be used, and the charges which may be made for the use thereof;

(d) regulate, so far as decency requires, the costumes to be worn by bathers;

(e) require persons providing accommodation for bathing to provide and maintain life-saving appliances, or other means of protecting bathers from danger; and

(f) regulate, for preventing danger to bathers, the navigation of vessels used for pleasure purposes within any area allotted for public bathing during the hours allowed for bathing.
 

dankilb

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23 Jan 2008
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Not unusual for lifeguarded beaches - indeed, around the world…

You can see where they’re coming from. If lifeguards give the public assurances that it’s safe to swim between the flags, then they are taking on a degree of responsibility for keeping all craft out of this area (and between the black/white flags).

It could be worse… despite most not being lifeguarded, nor suitable for bathing, the Wirral local authority around here bans all powered launch and recovery (>5hp I think) unless you’re ‘licensed’ by a single local private/for-profit powerboat school.
 

TernVI

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Probably more to do with unguarded propellors. Rowing ashore should be fine surely?
A sailing dinghy or windsurfer can inflict serious harm to a swimmer. Even quite small waves can send things out of control, particular if you've got the rudder and plate up. An inflatable tender is not so bad, but when they fill with water in the surf they can still knock people over. Your 20kg dinghy becomes a box containing half a ton of water. Even if you don't fill it with water, the weight of two passengers matters. We do see a few tender users being less careful than you'd like around swimmers, sometimes they don't realise the last few yards to the beach can be hectic, and some of them don't seem to want to get wet.
Likewise a lot of swimmers don't appreciate the dynamics of a boat in waves, but what can you expect from tourists?
We launch from a beach and frequently have to ask bathers to 'give us a bit of space for a few minutes please', they don't realise that a 505 with just a foot-high wave behind it is a thing of considerable force...

No surprise there are lots of rules about boats on tourist beaches.
 

Seven Spades

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Surrey
I would like to see evidence of an actual bylaw. I bet this was someone thow their weight around without any legal right to do so.
 
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TernVI

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I would like to see evidence of an actual bylaw. I bet this was someone thow their weight around without any legal right to do so.
There aresuch bylaws for tourist hotspots such as Stokes' Bay, Gosport, I'd be surprised if there isn't one for a resort like Bournemouth.
 

TernVI

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Does the owner of the foreshore between high and low water mark get any say in the matter?
If anyone wanted a say in the matter, the time for saying it was probably last century when the byelaws were written.
I've pored over a couple of sets of them in committee meetings of two sailing clubs.
Sometimes they are posted at the top of the beach.
There are loads of beaches I know where no boats are permitted in a yellow buoyed area, sometimes at certain times of year which may or may not coincide with when dogs are banned. Some beaches like Readymoney in Fowey, no boats may come ashore.
Some places you cannot legally sail within 'n' yards of the shore, which is a nuisance in Solent tides and light wind.
 

dankilb

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23 Jan 2008
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Is the implication that some resistance ought to have been - or should be - offered against the separation of watercraft and bathers on bathing beaches? If so, that seems a bit odd... (Or is it just acting as a proxy for airing of libertarian views in the newly apolitical forum?)

Try landing your tender/dinghy on a bathing beach elsewhere in the world - Australia or the US come to mind - and see how you get on. Likely you'll be caught in the nets before you get driven off by the lifeguards/authorities.

Swimmers are vulnerable in the water and have a right to some (pretty light touch) protection.
 

TLouth7

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Edinburgh
Here is the rule, presumably there is some actual byelaw granting this power, though I couldn't find it with a cursory search.

From April to October, you’ll see yellow marker buoys across the bay. These are 200 metres away from the low water mark. Watercraft can’t do the following in this area:
  • Go beyond six knots
  • Annoy or endanger other beach users
  • Run ashore or launch from the beach
Powered watercrafts must have an engine silencer fitted.


The area by Boscombe Artificial Reef has a 6 knot limit all year. This is marked with yellow buoys.
Interestingly you are allowed in the area with the swimmers, just not to land on the beach.
 
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