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Another anchor question

Dogone

Member
Joined
11 Feb 2014
Messages
96
Warning, a bit of a thread drift, but just something to satisfy my 'satiable curtiosity' how many of you carry a small anchor in your tender?
I carry two. One to hold it off the beach and another to anchor the retrieval line on the beach.

You may need one if your engine fails and you can't row against the wind. It could save you from getting thrown onto the rocks.
 

ashtead

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17 Jun 2008
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2,729
Location
Surrey and Gosport UK
Yes carry a small grapnel short chain plus rope in locker but rarely take in tender. It was intended for anchoring on a lake fly fishing but will hold an inflatable well enough. It’s certainly worth having btw.
on topic of second anchors was thinking of buying a rocna at say25kg to replace a 20kg Lexmar delta ,good idea? Stainless versions look very pricy but maybe a standard galvanised type -is it worth doing ?
 

prv

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29 Nov 2009
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36,603
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Southampton
Being mooring based, I work on the theory it could be useful on any trip if the engine stops.
Depends where you are; on most rivers down here with moorings, a couple of strokes on the oars would have you alongside some buoy, pile, or pontoon to hitch the painter to while you sort the engine out.

Anchored off some beach or bay, with an offshore wind (which is what I‘d have chosen for the yacht), an anchor in the dinghy is definitely wanted.

Pete
 

noelex

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2 Jul 2005
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3,660
Being mooring based, I work on the theory it could be useful on any trip if the engine stops.
The importance of safety in the tender is easy to underestimate, especially in colder climates, so I think this is a valid consideration.

We spent most of last year in Norway and here the anchorages were deep enough that carrying suitable anchoring gear would have been a little bulky (although not impossible) in our tender, but it is more practical around the UK.
 

lw395

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16 May 2007
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42,084
I anchor RIBs quite a lot, but I've never felt any desire or need to anchor the yacht tender. Either the hard tender used in our home harbour, or the inflatable.
Once your tender is too big to carry up the beach, then anchoring it is more likely to be useful.
Or if you want to do a bit of fishing perhaps.
 

noelex

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2 Jul 2005
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Once your tender is too big to carry up the beach, then anchoring it is more likely to be useful.
The anchor can sometimes be useful even with a small tender that has been dragged up the beach. If there is no suitable location to secure the painter, which sometimes happens, then digging the anchor in further up the beach provides belt and braces protection against mistakes with tidal calculations or unexpected waves/wakes.

It also prevents anyone from concluding the tender might just have been washed up on shore having been lost from passing vessel.
 
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prv

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29 Nov 2009
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36,603
Location
Southampton
I anchor RIBs quite a lot, but I've never felt any desire or need to anchor the yacht tender. Either the hard tender used in our home harbour, or the inflatable.
It‘s not about choosing to anchor, but having a way to avoid blowing out to sea while you try to get the engine going again.

Obviously you would have oars, but inflatables don’t row well against wind and tide, and if you’re alone in the boat you can’t row and tinker at the same time. Being able to anchor instead of drift gives you more options - possibly the option to wait for someone to come and help. The guy we picked up and towed back to his moored yacht a few years ago would have been a lot less exhausted if he’d been able to anchor his pram dinghy with its dead Tohatsu instead of frantically rowing against (and not overcoming) the current taking him out to sea.

There’s someone on this forum who says he never anchors his yacht because he dislikes stopping anywhere except a marina (seems odd to me but that’s his prerogative). But I’m sure he still carries one in case of emergency. The anchor in my tender is the same.

Pete
 

NormanS

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10 Nov 2008
Messages
7,759
We go ashore in our dinghy in all sorts of strange places. Having gone ashore, from bitter experience, I ALWAYS make the dinghy fast to something. It may be tied to a tree or a rock, but if landing on a sandy beach, we use a 4.5lb Danforth, which I bought when I was a schoolboy, rather a long time ago. I also always tie the oars in.
 
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