Unsticking a basin

Tradewinds

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Last year I installed a shiny new S/S basin in my heads. As instructed by the suppliers I laid it on a bed of silicone (standard bath stuff beneath its rim) & left a weight on it while it cured.

Job done.

Unfortunately, the basin surface has developed a fault & it has to be returned to the supplier who is giving me a direct replacement. The faulty basin is going back to the manufacturer.

My problem is releasing the basin from the cured silicon.

I've managed to get a blade under the rim at 9 o' clock & 3 o' clock & slice the silicone about 150mm each side but I can't get a blade under anywhere else. I'm reticent to use brute force as I don't want to damage the surface of the unit its mounted in. The manufacturer obviously would like to be able to examine the fault & I don't want the basin destroyed beyond recognition.

I've tried thumping from underneath but there's too much silicone still holding it in place.

I need to dissolve / weaken the silicone bond somehow. My local chandler stocks a silicone remover but that's a gel & wont get to the parts I can't reach - I need something that leeches & eats the silicone.

Any ideas?
 

sailorman

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I have not tried this so I can't endorse it but I have heard of a wire cheese cutter being used to cut through sealant.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/stranded-CH...=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B003E0U0YE

Thats a good idea
heres another version
thrigtensioner.jpg
 

Tradewinds

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Wire Cheese Slice

In a past job I used a hacksaw blade as a flexible knife blade. I would have the teeth ground out to a taper and then use a sanding disc to establish a thin, sharp edge.

The blade was used to slit protective packing placed inside a valve that was bring sand blasted. The point is the blade was flexible and could bend into awkward corners.

Another idea; use some guitar string, each end wrapped around some toggles to slice into the silicon. Use a sawing motion.

Good luck.
 

Martin_J

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If you haven't got wire handy then how about trying to saw through it with whipping twine... Wrap it around a wood dowel at each end like floss... It might take a while but it's cheap and could be worth a try...

I have some knife blades that are like 8" long razors (from an old knitting machine) that are perfect for this task but I have to be soooo careful using them.
 

Tradewinds

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If you haven't got wire handy then how about trying to saw through it with whipping twine... Wrap it around a wood dowel at each end like floss... It might take a while but it's cheap and could be worth a try...

I have some knife blades that are like 8" long razors (from an old knitting machine) that are perfect for this task but I have to be soooo careful using them.
Thanks.

I'm busy looking at G-strings at the moment . . .

I've used quite a fine blade but it only goes round the rim so far. The lip of the rim is hard onto the unit surface & there's no room to get a blade under.
 

alteredoutlook

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Can you get to it from underneath? i.e. inside the cabinet its placed upon. If so how about using a slot cutter mounted on a drill/flexible drive unit attached to the drill or maybe even a tool with a right angle e.g. a scraper when burning off old paint.
 
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DETAK Adhesive / Sealant Remover

This company sells stuff for softening mastics prior to removal. They use it on windows with old silicon / mastic sealant. Apparently the product was developed for breaking up chewing gum: -

Hadlow Marine

Low cost and worth a go before slicing up the basin support. May you could use a hypodermic needle to inject some in as best you can.
 

Tradewinds

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Can you get to it from underneath? i.e. inside the cabinet its placed upon. If so how about using a slot cutter mounted on a drill/flexible drive unit attached to the drill or maybe even a tool with a right angle e.g. a scraper when burning off old paint.
No I'm afraid not. There's just not enough room for what you've suggested.

I was rather hoping there was a chemical solution. I know white spirit attacks silicone (certainly when fresh) but I feel it will take weeks to break down a well established bond.

Like everybody nowadays, I'm hoping for a quick & easy solution!
 

Tradewinds

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This company sells stuff for softening mastics prior to removal. They use it on windows with old silicon / mastic sealant. Apparently the product was developed for breaking up chewing gum: -

Hadlow Marine

Low cost and worth a go before slicing up the basin support. May you could use a hypodermic needle to inject some in as best you can.

Slicing up the basin support is not an option :eek:.

Thanks for the link - I'll give them a call & see whether it's a possibility.
 

30boat

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Not that I recommend it but petrol attacks silicone very nicely.Diesel does as well and is far less dangerous.You could pour some into the sink and wait.And wait.
 

Tradewinds

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Not that I recommend it but petrol attacks silicone very nicely.Diesel does as well and is far less dangerous.You could pour some into the sink and wait.And wait.
Perhaps Lighter fuel around the rim - it may soften it enough?

But I think I'll try white spirit first, followed by the wire cheesecutter idea, then perhaps lighter fuel followed by the wire cutter, then maybe the stuff from Hadlow, then maybe a few hard thumps from beneath ... and so on.

I think I might be some time :eek:

Thanks for all the suggestions so far.
 

captainboo

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Basin Removal

I had to remove my aluminium framed windows from my boat that had been incorrectly stuck with some form of adhesive.

I also tried a blade but it wouldn't get into the non-existant gap.

In the end I used a very thin filler knife made by "Harris" that had a blade about 4" long that was paper thin and very flexible at the end. More importantly the blade tang went through the handle so I could tap it with a hammer and 'gently' force it along. Rounding one corner off with a grinding wheel prevented it from digging into the window frame.

It sucessfully removed my windows with no damage to frame or gelcoat.

Bought from B&Q.
 
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