Threaded skin fittings

G

Guest

Guest
I am attempting to fit a new water inlet scoop for the diesel engine.

Although the new threaded seacock will point in the right direction, and is ok for turning off and on, the next threaded angle joint points in an unusable direction when tightened. I have tried moving the strainer fitting through 180 degrees but this is just as bad.( the engine now has different engine mounts which has produced this problem)

Are there any tricks of the trade in overcoming this ?

Any ideas would be most gratefully recieved.

Thanks
 

ean_p

Well-known member
Joined
28 Dec 2001
Messages
2,944
Location
Humber
If the male threads are parallel and there is sufficient of them you might try filing the first half a thread off the fitting thereby moving the thread 'start' around the fitting....take care to keep the end level all around and that the final 'start' is good and clean so as to prevent a 'crossed' thread...this would be greatly helped if you could run a nut down the thread first before you start and then when its removed it cleans the 'start' for you....
 

coliholic

New member
Joined
11 Dec 2001
Messages
3,969
Location
Cambridge
Why not put a nut on the thread first, then put the fitting on as far down as you can but in the right position and then tighten the nut onto the fitting? Maybe use PTFE tape as well to seal it properly?
 
G

Guest

Guest
Vic,

I assume that the threaded fittings you are having problems with are pipe thread fittings.

Pipe threads have a slight taper, so as you tighten the joint seal gets better with increasing torque. There are two ways to get the fitting in the best position for a fair curve in the attached hose fitting.

If the fitting will not go quite far enough, I put a very light layer of teflon tape (pipe thread tape) on the threads. This lets me tighten the fitting just a little bit further.

The other option, if the fitting goes too far, is to put a heavy (three or four wrap) covering of teflon tape (pure teflon / no adhesive) and this causes the fitting to stop short. Either method forms a very solid joint, provided that sufficient torque is applied (slightly white knuckles, and a brief grunt while pulling on the end of a wrench 1 foot long).

Best,

I.
 
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