Skippers

suse

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Being now boatless, and intending to stay that way, I've crewed for many skippers over many years. How variable they've all been! How tactful is that remark!

If you're a skipper, what do you expect from your crew?

If you're crew - what do you look for in a skipper?

S x
 

Oliveoyl

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Popeye, as skipper, expects crew to highly experienced, fit, tireless, never seasick,cordon bleu chefs, even-tempered, and, if female, to be tall, blonde and busty.

Me as crew, dream of an even-tempered, teetotal, good teacher, and if he looks like Johnny Depp....

You may gather that there is a bit of a gap in our expectations
 

tcm

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I've been (and still am) crew on some boats, skip on others. I assume this applies to pleasure boats, not big ships of course. But maybe they do...

Wih novice crew, the name of the game is safety of course, though most people aren't daft - they just need explaining what the priorities are. The most important thing to explain is that i can get another boat or rope, but i can't them another arm/leg or other body parts at the chandlery. Hence priority is to look after themselves, cos holiday fun is over when people get hurt. Newbies often think they are yeehah heros if they do hero stuff but i say no -you are risking yerself and the whole holiday thing might be over the moment you have an accident or injury. Whereas if boat gets wham crunch a bit, I will say !$$%% but you'll be in one piece, honest.

With exp crew, they know most things, and sometimes (tho not always) more than me. In these instances as skip you are cheerleader, harbinger of bad jokes, the one who helps ensure everyone does what they'e best at and/or like doing (usually the same), and takes the lead in doing and sharing out the not-so-desirable jobs as well. Gawd this sounds leftish. As skip you also make clear the safety and money issues. It helps if you are not skint, cos boating ain't cheap.

I would expect a skip to make clear what is expected of me. I shouldn't be left doingsummink i am not happy doing alone - but nor should i be hovered over. Do i helm as though it's my boat or what? And so on. So i suppose skip shd be able to judge/trust crew abilities - or have done so in advance.

And yes, skip sets the mood. Not all remember that if it's all currently safe and working fine- that's *not* actually as good as it gets. It can and should be even better - it should be fantastic happy fun. Pursuit of happiness innit? Otherwise get on a plane or in a car or ferry, much cheaper.

Imho, a huge gaping hole in all training RYA stuff is in food and drink and sleep department. But anyone who did say scouts will have had much more attention to these issues, camping etc. I have been crew on solenty boat with v exp oceanmaster - but nothing on board to eat! He just shrugged. I thought it was quite crap to not have breakfast and then er aim for over there but uh-oh there might not be there by lunch and hahah jokes about his swmbo is rubbish at cooking... We just couldn't think of anything except how hungry we were. Boats don't need refuelling much, but people do and quite often. I am sure that lots of otherwise avoidable accidents etc have been excerbated with lack of attention to food, drink and sleep for crew.
 

Sixpence

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Not a lot many could say to top that , nicely put

Suzy , why is it your intention to remain boatless ?

From my limited experience I would hope to have a skipper that gives a full briefing on where everything was before we set off with special emphasis on safety and survival equipment , making sure that I know how to use everything . One thing that always helps is for everyone to be relaxed in each others company so I wouldn't go for a highly strung skipper , he / she would have to be the chilled out type with a good sense of humour but one that's able to know when it's time to be serious about things
 

Sybarite

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A skipper should temper the sailing to suit the experience of the crew. It may be fun for the skipper to be out in a force 6/7 but it may terrify new crew members and put them off for life. In general sailing should be introduced in small doses with plenty of stops to build up a climate of comfort and confidence. If this is done, it is my experience that it will be the crew that will ask for more.

John
 

Cliveshep

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Only occasionally crew for someone else, and always mobo's, my philosophy being that raggies always want a cold wind to go anywhere and it often rains to boot. Sunny days are best and if it rains we huddle up inside the cover!

We often have a mob of my two children plus a couple of school friends aboard who all "crew", we have a set of kids rules we blu-tack up, done in humour but with common sense mixed in in the hope it sticks in their minds. We also fly the Jolly Roger. Rules commonly used for example:

The Captain is seldom wrong, and you'd better not say anything if he is, just do what you're told.

Don't drink out of the toilet, clean your teeth first

Don't eat off the floor, unless you're a dog

Wipe your feet coming aboard, if you put mud on my carpets you'll have to lick it off later on

Stay out of the engine room, the spinning bit under the back of the boat is the propellor, if you must poke your nose in somewhere try that.

People who jump on/off moving boats onto locksides, or run around near the edge, or climb on the boat's rails get a free burial at sea next day (if we can find the body.)

No Rape and Pillage, pay for ice-creams or they won't let us come here again. Be polite to people, they might have bigger guns than you.

Don't throw rubbish over the side 'cos if you're not a good swimmer you might have a problem when you're thrown after it to recover it. Besides, under the water is Davy Jone's locker and he wants to keep that tidy too.

Keep one hand to hold on to the boat when stepping off. If you fall in and get all wet and smelly you'll sleep on deck 'till you dry out (assuming you get out. )

If you can't swim, ask the Captain for a life jacket before you fall in and not after.

Anyone crying for mummy will be distracted by doing all the washing up for a week.

Grog is available all day, but when helping yourself don't let the Captain see you with it unless you've made him a cup of tea first!
Ditto snacks, help your self but remember your Captain too.

Don't spit into the wind, and if you want to keep your arms and legs firmly attached don't let the Captain catch you spitting downwind either. Observe good manners unless you want to be towed astern by one ankle.

Be tidy, this is a boat not a dustbin. If you want to be untidy ask Mummy to take you to the local dump for the day when you get back. If you leave things lying about they'll either get trodden on, wet, or kicked over the side. If they go over the side they belong to Davy Jones who lives on the bottom. Your Captain can't breathe down there and neither can you so you've lost them for good.
 

Heigaro

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To skipper or crew: While I thoroughly enjoy good conversation on a boat there is no need to talk just because you feel you have to. As a friend of mine says: A companionable silence can be a real pleasure. /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
 

JREdginton

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[ QUOTE ]
collision regulations especially Rule 19

[/ QUOTE ]

'Conduct of vessels in restricted visibility' Why especially? Please don't get me wrong, I agree knowledge of the 'Rules of the Road' is required, I'm just curious as to why 19 in particular?
 
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