Seacock advice

SailingEcosse

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Hi Folks
First post and looking for some advice!:eek:
I've trawled the board but can't find any similar questions, so apologies if this has been discussed many times before (what hasn't!:rolleyes: )

But I'm hoping someone will be good enough to comment on the attached pics of one of a pair of seacocks (simpson lawrence I think) just removed from my boat.
The colour of the metal (bronze?) looks different inside to outside, and after being warned about dezincification, but never having seen it first hand before, I'm wondering whether this is what has caused the colouration of the internals?

Or is it just because the two parts (valve and body?) rub against each other? :cool:

Anyway, the bottom line is, should I be looking at changing them or do they still have some life in them?

Cheers
Alex
 

Searush

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Sorry you've been ignored. It's hard to tell much from a photo, but they look fine to me. Outside will always be oxidised compared to inside. Is there any pitting or grooving? It doesn't look like it. I would clean, grease & refit.

There isn't generally much strain on hull fittings - until they seize & you whack 'em with a hammer. :eek: So try to not let that happen! However, should one ever fail there will be a big hole in the hull, so keep a tapered wooden plug & mallet handy - just in case.

Try not to worry too much, mine have been in the boat for 39 years & are still fine and that isn't unusual. TBronze is used because it is a very durable metal, but they can get corroded - but will probably look pitted if they are.
 

Shibumi

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They're fine - there isn't any Zinc in true bronze to 'de-zincify'!

The pinkish colour is normal and, as others have said, in the absence of pitting / corrosion they are fine.

Steve
 

PetiteFleur

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They look just fine - make sure you use the proper seacock grease, Blakes is one correct grease. Incidently your valve look like a Blakes Seacock, usually well respected quality wise. I didn't think Simpson Lawrence made tapered seacocks like yours.
 

isandell

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Blakes seacocks are, and I think always have been, brass and not bronze, despite many chandlers claiming them to be bronze.

The brass used in dezincification resistant but can still be subject to dezinfication so dont assume that cos they are Blakes, they can't corrode.

Ian
 

VicMallows

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Anyway, the bottom line is, should I be looking at changing them or do they still have some life in them?

Once again: "I wish mine were as good as that".

Keep them greased (any old waterproof grease - don't waste your money on something special from the chandler) and you may never even need to grind them in with grinding paste - which only takes a few minutes anyway.:)

Vic
 

SailingEcosse

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There's no pitting or serious wear marks that I can see, and I presume that they are the originals (Colvic Sailer) as fitted, although they were siezed solid (in open position) and didn't look like they had been opened in years.

I presumed they were Simpson Lawrence as they are marked SLxxxx, but possibly this is just a serial or model number?

Anyway, thanks everyone for the comments, that puts my mind at rest (been reading too many horror stories of failed seacocks I think! :eek: ), and takes some of the strain of my wallet as well :cool:

Cheers
Alex
 

decdeb

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I've just removed 2 similar seacocks from our Giles 38. The seacocks themselves weren't bad, but the through-hull bolts were badly corroded, as was the bronze ring on outside of hull. I'm nearly sure they are Simpson Lawrence, but as far as I'm aware I don'y think they can still be got?

Have narrowed down replacements to either Blakes or Marelan and think I may go for Marelon type, because the Blake Seacock requires the drilling of 4 holes through the hull. The existing seacocks have 3 through-hull bolts and you can be sure they won't line up. With the Marelon seacock no extra holes need be drilled, and I can fill the existing ones.
 

VicS

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I've just removed 2 similar seacocks from our Giles 38. The seacocks themselves weren't bad, but the through-hull bolts were badly corroded, as was the bronze ring on outside of hull. I'm nearly sure they are Simpson Lawrence, but as far as I'm aware I don'y think they can still be got?

Have narrowed down replacements to either Blakes or Marelan and think I may go for Marelon type, because the Blake Seacock requires the drilling of 4 holes through the hull. The existing seacocks have 3 through-hull bolts and you can be sure they won't line up. With the Marelon seacock no extra holes need be drilled, and I can fill the existing ones.
And with Marelon you can forget all about dezincification and other types of corrosion
 

Tranona

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I've just removed 2 similar seacocks from our Giles 38. The seacocks themselves weren't bad, but the through-hull bolts were badly corroded, as was the bronze ring on outside of hull. I'm nearly sure they are Simpson Lawrence, but as far as I'm aware I don'y think they can still be got?

Have narrowed down replacements to either Blakes or Marelan and think I may go for Marelon type, because the Blake Seacock requires the drilling of 4 holes through the hull. The existing seacocks have 3 through-hull bolts and you can be sure they won't line up. With the Marelon seacock no extra holes need be drilled, and I can fill the existing ones.

No, you won't be able to get the 3 bolt type, but you could get new plates made and new bronze bolts from Anglian Stainless. Substantially cheaper than replacements if the cones and bodies are OK. I had to replace one of this type because the cone had gone oval and chose a new Blakes. There is not a lot of difference in price between a Blakes and buying a bronze skin fitting, DZR ball valve and bronze tail. The added bonus for me was that the Blakes is lower which helped in the installation of my gravity holding tank. You will find the external diameter of the spigot is slightly larger, and of course you have to drill the 4 fixing holes and plug the old ones, but that is no big deal as the plugged holes will be covered by the new plate.
 
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