Rutgeson Full Batten Retaining Buckles......

duncan99210

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I've got a fullyu batened mainsail that uses Rutgerson Cars and Fittings. The buckle that retains the batten in the pocket has 3 slots and a locking clip. Foolishly, when I took them off the sail last year, I forgot to make a note of how to thread them. Anyone out there got any ideas about how to thread them without breaking the things! Any help gratefully received!
 

Norman_E

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I had that type, but am afraid that I cannot be much help, what I do remember was that the only way I could do it was to remove the screws holding the clip, pull the strap tight then re-assemble the clip over it. I don't know if yours are the same, however as Rutgerson have changed the design at least once.

When I changed the sail I had new type Rutgerson cars fitted, and the sailmaker did away with fitting the battens from the luff. The new sail has them fitted from the leach with velcro in the pocket, and a velcro faced strap that secures them. A push stick inserts the velcro strap (folded double) into the pocket, it unfolds as it goes in and is totally secure. To get the batten out the push stick is inserted to separate the velcro, and the strap pulled out.
 

Norman_E

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Good idea. Will give it a go and if it fails, shrug our shoulders!

Be very careful not to drop the screws or the nuts, or lose the little steel strap. They are a bit of a fiddle to put back together, and a second person to put the nuts on as you re-assemble is useful.
 

Nigel_Ward

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Are the batten cars like this?

If so, you do not need to remove the screws or bar.

I spent a while fiddling when I bought my boat as the battens were rigged in two ways. I think the top is correct.

If it is like these then undo the lock lever. Pull the plastic wedge aft keeping the loop of flat braid tape through the metal bar. Pull the loop down (or up) so the batten can be slid aft through the bar into the pocket (behind the metal bar). When the batten is fully home lift the end of the tape round the batten end. push the plastic wedge back into the bar then tension the tape and lock with the lever.
 

richardm47

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Rutgerson Batten Retaining Gizmo

We have exactly that system on our mainsail, and my son and I were bending on the mainsail yesterday, with much annoyance at the poor design. (Sorry if you were offended by the language on berth C11 yesterday.)

Maybe we've missed the point but we concluded that the metal plate and its 2 nuts and bolts had to be removed from the fitting to allow the batten to be put in its proper place. Cue dropped and lost bits. And then you have to align both white plastic bits with the hole in the sail itself to get the bolts back in - yes they can all move independantly! We do need 2 people to do the job.

One tip: leave those tiny nuts in their sockets and put gaffer tape over the sockets to keep the nuts from falling out and overboard.

I don't think either of the examples in the photo is correct. They don't use the wedge shape of the ladder buckle to grip the tensioning strap properly against the dished metal plate. I'll be on the boat today, will try to take photos for you. You'll see that the slotted heads of the bolts on our fittings are similarly chewed up!
 

Norman_E

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That was the system I had, before ditching it. It was physically impossible to get enough grip on the plastic wedges to pull them out unless the screws were removed. If I remember correctly the tape was threaded in-out-in-out through the plastic part.
 

Nigel_Ward

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We have exactly that system on our mainsail, and my son and I were bending on the mainsail yesterday, with much annoyance at the poor design. (Sorry if you were offended by the language on berth C11 yesterday.)

Maybe we've missed the point but we concluded that the metal plate and its 2 nuts and bolts had to be removed from the fitting to allow the batten to be put in its proper place. Cue dropped and lost bits. And then you have to align both white plastic bits with the hole in the sail itself to get the bolts back in - yes they can all move independantly! We do need 2 people to do the job.

One tip: leave those tiny nuts in their sockets and put gaffer tape over the sockets to keep the nuts from falling out and overboard.

I don't think either of the examples in the photo is correct. They don't use the wedge shape of the ladder buckle to grip the tensioning strap properly against the dished metal plate. I'll be on the boat today, will try to take photos for you. You'll see that the slotted heads of the bolts on our fittings are similarly chewed up!

I rigged my boat the other day and did not undo the plates to put the battens in! Took me about five minutes but only because of the length of the battens.

Now I have worked out my method I find it relatively easy, the problem is that it is obviously an ambiguous system and if you only do it once a year you cannot remember the last time.
 

ghostlymoron

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Are the batten cars like this?

If so, you do not need to remove the screws or bar.

I spent a while fiddling when I bought my boat as the battens were rigged in two ways. I think the top is correct.

If it is like these then undo the lock lever. Pull the plastic wedge aft keeping the loop of flat braid tape through the metal bar. Pull the loop down (or up) so the batten can be slid aft through the bar into the pocket (behind the metal bar). When the batten is fully home lift the end of the tape round the batten end. push the plastic wedge back into the bar then tension the tape and lock with the lever.
Referring to the top fitting in the photo, the strap should go (from the left) under/over/under/over then under the flap. My sail maker showed me how to do it when I bought some spare wedges from him. It's not necessary to remove the steel plate. Sail maker also told me that 90% of the ones he's seen are threaded incorrectly.
 
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