Replacing cutlass bearing

bluemoongaffer

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Having spent several days and a few skinned knuckles getting the old cutlass bearing out, I'm about ready to put the new one in. The old one had a phenolic outer shell and I had to cut it out. The supplier (Sillette) says that a brass housing will be easier to get in and then out again when needed, so that's what I'm replacing it with. My question is: any suggestions on what to put on the mating surface between the new bearing shell and the bearing housing to try and make it easier to get out in the future? Grease or WD40 or similar. I guess copperease is wrong?

Thanks in advance
Paul
 

Skysail

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Most people put nothing there. I think you are right that a brass shell is easier to extract; I had a phenolic shell that was a nightmare to remove. I think they swell.

Putting the new bearing in the 'frig makes it easier to insert.

Its handy to make up a puller for the cutless, takes all the nervous strain out of it.

.
 

30boat

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Having spent several days and a few skinned knuckles getting the old cutlass bearing out, I'm about ready to put the new one in. The old one had a phenolic outer shell and I had to cut it out. The supplier (Sillette) says that a brass housing will be easier to get in and then out again when needed, so that's what I'm replacing it with. My question is: any suggestions on what to put on the mating surface between the new bearing shell and the bearing housing to try and make it easier to get out in the future? Grease or WD40 or similar. I guess copperease is wrong?

Thanks in advance
Paul

If you have a normal P bracket the best way to fit and remove the cutless bearing is with a puller that also acts as a press.Never hit it with a hammer because it is very easy to loosen the P.bracket.I made my own puller and can post a photo if needed.
 

Tranona

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Assume it is in the normal screw on housing. In which case find a friendly workshop with a press. Two minutes and job done. Same when (if) you ever have to remove it again - use a press. Don't forget the grub screw if fitted.
 

Neil_Y

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This may have come a bit late, but the latest type of water lubricated shaft bearing (doesn't cut anything) are bedded on epoxy as a clearance fit. To remove simply heat the carrier (if P bracket metal) or split the joint with a sharp chisel and they come out easily. When epoxy is used as a bedding and is thinner than 1.00mm it doesn't bond so it can be easily peeled/separated. This method is used on grp stern tubes as well as bronze ones.

Fitting, as they are mad a clearance fit you can have a dry run assembly with the shaft if you wish as they should slide in and turn by hand in the carrier. Once you are happy coat carrier and bearing with low temp epoxy (araldite 2011) and slide bearing in. leave to set and job done.

This method is used on many commercial vessels like pilot boats who change bearings every season, as well as on quite big shafts we did some 8" recently.

Press fit bearings are designed for press fit so they have a larger ID before fitting, there will be some bore closure due to the press fit. Aquarius are designed as a clearance fit so the ID is finished to suit the shaft and does not alter during fitting.
 
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omega2

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cutless

23rdjune2010LIFTOUT016.jpg


if yours are like this, then no need to remove shaft, we "sliced" a peice of scaffold tube down the middle sat it on the shaft butted it onto the bearing and with a few taps of a club hammer it comes out, providing you remove the grub screw first. We had to remove phenolic whatevers before and they are e real pain, i.e. shaft out then hacksaw. replacing is the reverse but generally they slide home with the need of much force.
 

Alpha22

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How about this for ideas?? The puller is a Triumph spitfire spring compressor with modifications. The blue part is a piece of scaffold tube split down the middle. The screws pull the whole thing together and squeeze out the bearing. Reassembly is simply the reversal of disassembly.
1577cj.jpg
 

30boat

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cutless.jpg

This is what is normally used in your case.The inside washer must be the exact size of the outer diameter of the cutless bearing.
 

Tranona

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Hi

Thanks for the replies. Unfortunately, I have a long keel boat with the cutlass bearing bolted to the keel - so no access to get a puller behind it....
Then take the bolts out - they only lock it into position and unscrew the housing from the stern tube. Off to the workshop as I suggested earlier. Re-assemble with a bead of sealer around the flange.
 

bluemoongaffer

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30boat: Thanks, I'll check that out. I think though that there may be a lip on the inboard end of the housing to stop the bearing going further up the tube, which might make it tricky

Tranona: "Then take the bolts out - they only lock it into position and unscrew the housing from the stern tube. Off to the workshop as I suggested earlier. Re-assemble with a bead of sealer around the flange."

Yes, I guess that'll be the easiest thing to do - thanks. Sod's law will make sure that the tube will unscrew at the inboard end and then that bearing will have to come off as well.
 

Neil_Y

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23rdjune2010LIFTOUT016.jpg


if yours are like this, then no need to remove shaft, we "sliced" a peice of scaffold tube down the middle sat it on the shaft butted it onto the bearing and with a few taps of a club hammer it comes out, providing you remove the grub screw first. We had to remove phenolic whatevers before and they are e real pain, i.e. shaft out then hacksaw. replacing is the reverse but generally they slide home with the need of much force.

There are phenolic bearings and phenolic shelled rubber bearings. If they are phenolic they may be just bedded on epoxy as a clearance fit and you just heat the carrier to soften the epoxy and they slide out by hand. Hammering where the thrust is taken on a P bracket should be avoided it is easy to end up with a carrier out of alignment.
 

Tranona

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Yes, I guess that'll be the easiest thing to do - thanks. Sod's law will make sure that the tube will unscrew at the inboard end and then that bearing will have to come off as well.

Highly unlikely as the tube is a tight fit in the deadwood and the inboard fitting will also be screwed on and held by bolts or set screws. This type of tube is designed so that the outer housing can be removed to replace the cutles. A 12 inch stilson and a sharp tug should do it.
 

cmedsailor

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Any ideas how to remove the cutlass bearing from the Beneteau skeg? It doesn't seem to move (after removing the screws) and it's a huge pain to drop the ludder in order to remove the shaft.
 
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