Myth or Truth? "Watering" wood prior to varnish/oil

McSalty

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I have been working extensively on bringing back the (extremely!) weathered wood (Teak) of the superstructure of my boat to a "nice & clean look".

When I started to sand (had to reach far down to 80grid paper to remove all the grey/black and soft "dust-like" surfaces) it looked horrible (most of the old varnish long since gone - but the few pieces left in place covered "nice & clean" looking Teak)

While dry it shows already in quite an even colouring but when hosing it down it looks awfully "speckled" (all color ranges from spots that are very dark brown to almost sand colored)

I now wonder if that "truth" I have somewhere stored in the back of my mind is correct, that hosing the wood down will give one an impression/idea on how it will look like when later painted or oiled (have not decided yet)

Currently I am leaning towards Owatrol D1 + D2 Treatment since by all reports I have read it seems to be the treatment most "natural" to Teak, with a fairly easy application (wet on wet, not much sanding inbetween) and an easy upkeep (sand it down ever so slightly twice a year, recoat it with a few coats of D1 + D2 again)

I am not after the "High-Gloss Super-Yacht-Look" but want her to look "clean" and well cared for.

So the question really is: Should I continue to sand until it shows the desired final result when wet - or will the oil take care of evening out the shades?
 
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simonfraser

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Wet the wood & u'l get a fair idea of how speckled it will look treated.

Clean it once with a teak cleaner.

I'd treat it with sikkins & move on, life's not perfect.
 

Tranona

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Don't use oil type finishes as you will condemn yourself to a lifetime of constant maintenance. Clean it with oxalic acid to get rid of most of the staining then with acetone to remove some of the oil on the surface. Coat with conventional varnish (many coats!) if you want a bright finish or Skkens Novatec/top if you want a durable woody type finish.
 

VicS

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According to Sikkens, Novatech/ Novatop are not suitable for oily woods such as teak! But they are very popular!

Sikkens Cetol Marine ( natural) is working well for me. I believe it may have been discontinued although it is still available at the moment and one of Sikkens' websites still includes it. It has a rather orange colour to it though.

Chap at the yard with a wooden classic uses Varnol. See http://varnol.co.uk/index.html
Worth using for the aroma of the turpentine oil it contains!

Tried the Owatrol Deks Olje :( :eek:
 

westernman

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According to Sikkens, Novatech/ Novatop are not suitable for oily woods such as teak! But they are very popular!

Sikkens Cetol Marine ( natural) is working well for me. I believe it may have been discontinued although it is still available at the moment and one of Sikkens' websites still includes it. It has a rather orange colour to it though.

Chap at the yard with a wooden classic uses Varnol. See http://varnol.co.uk/index.html
Worth using for the aroma of the turpentine oil it contains!

Tried the Owatrol Deks Olje :( :eek:

The inside of the bulwarks on my boat were done with Varnol. Since redone with Tonkinois. Looks much better.

For amateur varnishers with better things to do, Le Tonkinois works a real treat. It is easy to use and touch up and will go on in almost any weather. I even got good results on stuff were the last bit was actually done in the rain!

You won't get that the same effect as 20 coats of professionally sprayed on Epifanes.

No connection - just happy with the magic it has worked with my limited skill and patience.
 

Ubergeekian

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Don't use oil type finishes as you will condemn yourself to a lifetime of constant maintenance. Clean it with oxalic acid to get rid of most of the staining then with acetone to remove some of the oil on the surface. Coat with conventional varnish (many coats!) if you want a bright finish or Skkens Novatec/top if you want a durable woody type finish.

I'd have said it was exactly the other way round. Rub a bit of teak oil into it when you feel like it, or when you have an hour at anchor to fill, for a nice, easy, low-maintenance surface. Varnish it if you want constant maintenance demands for ever.
 

Ubergeekian

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While dry it shows already in quite an even colouring but when hosing it down it looks awfully "speckled" (all color ranges from spots that are very dark brown to almost sand colored)

How did you sand it? Any sort of rigid or semi-rigid support for the abrasive will result in less-dealt-with low patches unless you remove an awful lot of wood. I find that a good rub with a kitchen scouring pad works wonders for a nice even finish.
 

Tranona

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I'd have said it was exactly the other way round. Rub a bit of teak oil into it when you feel like it, or when you have an hour at anchor to fill, for a nice, easy, low-maintenance surface. Varnish it if you want constant maintenance demands for ever.

Not in my experience. Oil finishes just evaporate and need constantly "topping up" - tiresome and messy. Good quality traditional varnish once you have put in the considerable effort to get a good solid coating lasts well. Porous woodstains, once you accept the appearance beats the lot. Despite the reservations from Sikkens I have found it works fine on Douglas Fir, Mahogany type woods and Iroko. Limited experience with Teak as not wealthy enough to have any decorative Teak
 

Ubergeekian

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Not in my experience. Oil finishes just evaporate and need constantly "topping up" - tiresome and messy. Good quality traditional varnish once you have put in the considerable effort to get a good solid coating lasts well.

In general I agree, but not for teak. It's too oily, so any conventional varnish will fairly soon start cracking, splitting and falling off.
 

Poignard

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For amateur varnishers with better things to do, Le Tonkinois works a real treat. It is easy to use and touch up and will go on in almost any weather. I even got good results on stuff were the last bit was actually done in the rain!

You won't get that the same effect as 20 coats of professionally sprayed on Epifanes.

No connection - just happy with the magic it has worked with my limited skill and patience.

Agree 100% with that. Le Tonkinois is ideal for bone-idle types like me who want to keep the boat looking presentable (and protected from the elements) without a lot of hard work and too much encroachment on other, more exciting, activities, e.g. sailing
 
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