Mnemonics for remembering ColRegs lights

DaveParry

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I am trying to learn the lights and shapes from the ColRegs, and am trying to come up with mnemonics to help remember them. Can't help thinking that someone must have done this before, so please let me know any good ones you use. I appreciate they can mean a lot more if you think of them yourself, and maybe nothing to someone else, but here are my efforts so far anyway:

Restricted Ability to Manoeuvre (Well) - RAMW - Reds and Middle White (red/white/red)
Constrained by Draught - CBD - Cylinder of Blood Displayed (3 vertical reds) or vertical cylinder by day.
Not Under Command (eg. steering or power failure). Skipper says 'Bloody Hell' - so lights one red for each word (2 vertical reds). In the day he says 'Balls' and hoists two of them.
Vessels Aground - imagine the same skipper with the engine failure. He already had two reds, so now puts on the anchor lights too. (White over two reds). In the day he adds another ball to the two up already.
 

claymore

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The only one I remember is for Pilot on board with the white cap of the pilot on top of his red face - red from his exertions of climbing on board
 
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red over white --frying tonight?or was it white over red --get into bed??

Beth
 
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I presume you are learning these for exam purposes. it would probably be too late, and a risky business, if you don't immediately recognise the lights in a real life situation.
 

claymore

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real life

I've not recognised lights at first but just steered to give things a wide berth. All lights, whatever their configuration seem to trigger an automatic brain response that tells me to keep clear.
 

Chris_Stannard

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Re: real life

Good rule, if you do not understand what it is stay well clear, I saw recently some guy got drowned going between a tug and it's tow.

Seriously, get a pack of flash cards from the chandlers and get someone to practice with you. It's much better to recognise the lights for themselves, than to fish around for some rhyme and get it wrong.

Good luck with the test

Chris Stannard
 

Grehan

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Flash cards

Flash cards are good.

My son and I spent a pleasurable few weeks prior to the YM exam, every few evenings down the pub, he helping me to revise and testing me, using the cards - and having a few beers. Good topic of conversation amongst the other regulars, too.

At the end of the process I passed, can remember most I think, but he's absolutely red hot on them!
 

Miker

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And then there are the sound signals

I learnt them via a handy PC disc but can never remember the lot so have a crib sheet on the boat. I must mug up again before I put the boat in.
 

claymore

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Re: And then there are the sound signals

I think 5 blasts is the most important one - especially down by Wyre Light when it emanates from something with Pandora written down the sides
 

Miker

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Re: And then there are the sound signals

You're right. the first time I got one, I nearly jumped out of my skin.
I now keep well out of the way, if the RoRo is around.
 
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Re: And then there are the sound signals

When in danger or in doubt

Always keep a good look out

In danger with no room to turn

Ease her, stop her, go astern


When both side lights you see ahead,

Starboard your wheel and show your Red. *


If to your Starboard Red appears

It is your duty to keep clear,

To act as judgement says is proper

To Port or Starboard, back or stop her


But if upon your Port is seen

A steamer's Starboard light of Green

Theres ' not so much for you to do

'Cause Green to Port keeps clear of you
 
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Re: And then there are the sound signals

and some more, courtesy of Geoff Kuenning et al

red over red, captain in bed

red over green, sailing machine

red over white, fishing tonight

green over white , trawling tonight

white over white, tug at night

red over red over red - rudder rubbing rocks

white over red, pilot ahead
 

davidhand

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Here is a couple:
White over red pilot ahead.
Red over white fresh fish tonight.
Red over red, captain's dead.
When returning from sea buoys should be;
IALA A. Red to red safely home to bed.
IALA B. Red on right returning.
Got any more?
 
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Re: And then there are the sound signals

I found David Mellors Book "Rules of the Road for Small Craft" very good. I was much clearer and easier to understand than the coarse notes and the RYA booklet.
By the way, One of the questions in the paper that I was given, two weeks ago, had a question about single-handed sailors.
 
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single handers

That Q appears every year in one guise or another. It always asks in its own way if according to IRPCS single handed sailing is legal.
Interesting point here, though. IRPCS Rule 5 suggests that it is not, but then the RYA Patron HM Queen has seen fit to lay her swod upon the shoulders of such luminaries as Sir Francis Chichester, Sir Alec Rose, Sir Robin Knox Johnston and Sir Chay Blyth!
 

bedouin

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Re: single handers

I don't think Rule 5 explicitly makes single-handed sailing illegal. The term 'proper lookout' is not defined and a singled-handed yacht using a radar alarm is probably keeping just as good a lookout as most commercial vessels.

However it is difficult to see how you can be below decks for more than about 10 minutes in coastal waters without breaking the spirit of Rule 5.
 
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