Joining Raynet network cable

Crowblack

Active member
Joined
23 Apr 2005
Messages
332
Location
East Coast.
Visit site
Need to join a cut Raynet cable - had to do it as there was no way to thread the Raymarine dedicated end through built in conduit in the boat.

Called Raymarine and expected to be told to use one of their advertised couplers - advised not to use - best they said is to solder and heat shrink.

Now I'm totally useless at soldering particularly with such tiny wires is there a way to rejoin mechanically ?

There four sets of twisted wire - so eight - plus a bare what l take to be a shield wire so nine to be joined in total.

Has anyone joined Raynet cable successfully with a mechanical method - advice on type of joiner used and method would be much appreciated.
 

prv

Well-known member
Joined
29 Nov 2009
Messages
37,361
Location
Southampton
Visit site
Four twisted pairs sounds suspiciously like ethernet, so I'd probably crimp on a couple of RJ45s and use a coupler. That or some suitable punchdown junction block in a box. You'll find a lot more options on Google for joining ethernet than for Raymarine's proprietary name for it.

Pete
 

Crowblack

Active member
Joined
23 Apr 2005
Messages
332
Location
East Coast.
Visit site
Thanks PRV - off to Maplins to have look round at punch down boxes - location of join is between skins on an Etap so is dry and secure - so punch down box looks way to go.
 

Cardo

Active member
Joined
3 Oct 2005
Messages
4,231
Location
In a plastic tub!
www.yacht-tinkerbell.co.uk
Raynet is simply ethernet cable. Sometimes the cables have Raymarine's proprietary waterproof connectors, other times it's just an RJ45 connector on the end. I did as Pete says when running the radar cable through the deck and crimped on two RJ45 connectors and used a cheapo coupler from eBay.
 

Crowblack

Active member
Joined
23 Apr 2005
Messages
332
Location
East Coast.
Visit site
Ta Cardonald - yes it's got to be a coupler and rj45 plugs crimped on - a punch down box is just a wee bit too big for the gap between the skins.

By the way is Tinkerbell formerly Southerly Buster owned by Jim Brent if so was on her back in the - think it was early 90's very nicely kept boat.
 

simonfraser

Well-known member
Joined
13 Mar 2004
Messages
7,443
Visit site
if you do decide to solder after all, and i would to be sure, heat shrink, amalgam tape too perhaps
solder the small wires a few cm apart, as in not all on top of each other, easier and thinner
 

KevinT1

Active member
Joined
23 Nov 2011
Messages
584
Location
Home Noss Mayo, Boat Yealm
Visit site
I had the same issue installing my new Raymarine plotter and radar last winter.

If you go the "replace the RJ45" route then use the Maplin connector that has a separate wire guide that is inserted into the RJ45 connector - I spent hours trying to get the 8 cores lined up with generic versions, with the Maplin version it was seconds to get the cores in the right order / places. And the Maplin plug comes shielded as well.

http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/maplin-cat-5cat-5e-shielded-cable-rj45-connectors-10-pack-jt48c

Just seen that they have the crimp tool for £5 !

Finally - if it needs to be waterproof, then Raymarine have a waterproof coupler, i used that even though my joint was below decks.
 
Last edited:

Lon nan Gruagach

Active member
Joined
12 Mar 2015
Messages
7,172
Location
Isle of Eigg
Visit site
get an ethernet jack socket with idc (punch-down) terminals. Put both sets of wires into the idc and ignore the front. Be sure to follow the colour convention (usually on a crib sheet on the connector)

Although you really should have room for one of these:
http://easycablings.buy.webtextiles.com/pz6df405e-home-network-cat6-rj45-keystone-jack-idc-ce-8p8c-golden-pin-modular-jack.html


Note for assembling rj45 plugs:

Strip about 10 ~ 15mm more than you need, pinch the end of the outer sheath. start with the outer cores (as seen from the top of the plug, fan them out quite wide (130 degrees). For each core pinch and pull, sliding along to produce a straight wire. Gather the cores together, pinch and flex up and down and left and right, this will get them all side by side and straight to go into the plug. Trim to length. The plug has grooves on the bottom of the cable entry, use these to guide the cores into the holes.
 

KevinT1

Active member
Joined
23 Nov 2011
Messages
584
Location
Home Noss Mayo, Boat Yealm
Visit site
get an ethernet jack socket with idc (punch-down) terminals. Put both sets of wires into the idc and ignore the front. Be sure to follow the colour convention (usually on a crib sheet on the connector)

Although you really should have room for one of these:
http://easycablings.buy.webtextiles.com/pz6df405e-home-network-cat6-rj45-keystone-jack-idc-ce-8p8c-golden-pin-modular-jack.html


Note for assembling rj45 plugs:

Strip about 10 ~ 15mm more than you need, pinch the end of the outer sheath. start with the outer cores (as seen from the top of the plug, fan them out quite wide (130 degrees). For each core pinch and pull, sliding along to produce a straight wire. Gather the cores together, pinch and flex up and down and left and right, this will get them all side by side and straight to go into the plug. Trim to length. The plug has grooves on the bottom of the cable entry, use these to guide the cores into the holes.

Dougal - as I mentioned in my earlier post - generic RJ45 were impossible to get the Raynet wires into - they appear to be of a larger diam than normal. I found the Maplin version very easy to use

http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/maplin-cat...-10-pack-jt48c

Kevin
 

Crowblack

Active member
Joined
23 Apr 2005
Messages
332
Location
East Coast.
Visit site
Thanks to all for contributions - to assist anyone doing in the future - in the end went for a punchdown box from Cable Monkey - Cat5e - also bought a cheapo punchdown tool just to ensure the joints were made well. Cost about £15 to make the joint - expensive but overall in the great scheme of things I can use the the tool for other stuff when needed.

The box was about two inches long and roughly one square so fits between the skins of the boat quite nicely where it's nice and dry so (hopefully) no problems with integrity - was pleasantly surprised with how secure the small connections felt after being made - cables also secured with cable ties to the box.

To answer Muds query - The drain wire (if thats what you mean) I soldered and insulated inside the box - it was only after I opened the packaging looking at the wiring instructions did I find that you can buy a box with extra punchdown terminals to accommodate - you live and learn.

Overall an easy way to make a joint in Raynet cable as long as it's dry and secure.

Thanks again.
 

skyflyer

Active member
Joined
26 Jan 2011
Messages
1,433
Location
Worcester, UK
Visit site
Just to clarify, am I correct in assuming when you speak about "ray net" cable, this applies to any part of the network, i.e. backbone or spur? Its all the same cable (just different colours) albeit possibly different terminations and connections at each end?
 

prv

Well-known member
Joined
29 Nov 2009
Messages
37,361
Location
Southampton
Visit site
Just to clarify, am I correct in assuming when you speak about "ray net" cable, this applies to any part of the network, i.e. backbone or spur? Its all the same cable (just different colours) albeit possibly different terminations and connections at each end?

I'm not totally familiar with the new generation stuff, but it sounds to me like you're mixing up "Raynet" (ie, ethernet) with SeatalkNG (ie, NMEA2000 / CANbus)

Pete
 

KevinT1

Active member
Joined
23 Nov 2011
Messages
584
Location
Home Noss Mayo, Boat Yealm
Visit site
I'm not totally familiar with the new generation stuff, but it sounds to me like you're mixing up "Raynet" (ie, ethernet) with SeatalkNG (ie, NMEA2000 / CANbus)

Pete

Yes - Raynet is the Ethernet ( or CAT 5 ) type cabling that connects the Radar to the MFD.You can use normal CAT5 connectors

Seatalk and SeatalkNG are Raymarines version of NME0183 and NME2000. In the case of Seatalk NG these are plug and play ( connections ) , but Raymarine specific connectors.

Of course I may have missed out a specific technical point - but hopefully you get the gist of it
 

prv

Well-known member
Joined
29 Nov 2009
Messages
37,361
Location
Southampton
Visit site
Yes - Raynet is the Ethernet ( or CAT 5 ) type cabling that connects the Radar to the MFD.You can use normal CAT5 connectors

Seatalk and SeatalkNG are Raymarines version of NME0183 and NME2000. In the case of Seatalk NG these are plug and play ( connections ) , but Raymarine specific connectors.

Of course I may have missed out a specific technical point - but hopefully you get the gist of it

I know all that - the question is which of them Skyflyer was referring to.

It was his mention of "backbone or spur" that hinted at SeatalkNG rather than Raynet.

Pete
 

VicMallows

New member
Joined
25 Nov 2003
Messages
3,794
Location
Emsworth, Chichester Hbr, UK
Visit site
Very disappointing if RAYMARINE are usurping the term RAYNET !!

For as long as I can remember (and that is quite a long time!) it stands for:

RADIO AMATEUR EMERGENCY NETWORK

(An emergency communication service provided by licensed radio amateur operators if and when needed).
 

Crowblack

Active member
Joined
23 Apr 2005
Messages
332
Location
East Coast.
Visit site
Just to clarify, am I correct in assuming when you speak about "ray net" cable, this applies to any part of the network, i.e. backbone or spur? Its all the same cable (just different colours) albeit possibly different terminations and connections at each end?

Well no - it's not the same - perhaps if I describe my installation and what I was trying to achieve.

I bought a boat with a set of ST60 wind, depth and speed instruments plus an autopilot with heading sensor all talking together to an old RM chartplotter on the old NMEA 0183 seatalk.

I wanted to upgrade to a new generation MFD and radar plus a McMurdo AIS transponder all using NMEA2000.

So described what I wanted to do to RM and they specc'd a conversion bar (my words) to plug the old seatalk into so it would talk to the new NMEA 2000 instruments - and use the heading sensor off the old autopilot for the radar - - any new "furrin" bits like the AIS would be just joined up using one their "device net" cables.

So the words "backbone or spur" as PRV said refers to the messages that pass between instruments on NMEA2000 or Seatalk ng as Raymarine call it.

However as soon as you introduce radar and repeater MFD's (and forgive me if I've got this bit wrong) it needs a different kind of cable that will cope with all the messages sent - hence Raynet or Ethernet cable.

So what I was doing was installing a second MFD (to act as a repeater) under the sprayhood that could take messages from the Data Master MFD at the chart table providing all the info of the system plus radar - this cockpit MFD just needed a power cable and a Raynet (Ethernet) network cable nothing else.

If I'd have joined it with a Seatalk ng cable it would have just picked up the instruments.

The way I came to think about it was all the low speed stuff like wind, log, etc is Seatalk ng (NMEA2000) all the high content stuff like MFD's and Radar is Raynet (Ethernet) . The difference being that Raynet can also transmit the low speed stuff whilst Seatalk ng can't transmit radar info.

Blimey ain't sailing complicated these days - greater minds than mine will tell me if I've got any of that wrong - - all I know is it all works.
 

skyflyer

Active member
Joined
26 Jan 2011
Messages
1,433
Location
Worcester, UK
Visit site
I think you misunderstood my query. I realise that the function and structure of data packets, voltages etc etc may be different depending on which system is used. I did not want to connect one to another directly.

All I was asking was whether, in any single given cable, it was acceptable to cut it and join it again. In other words does the actual join/junction/splice etc interfere with the signal transmission.

In particular I was wondering about principles like twisted pair cables where - obviously - you cannot continue the twist when you join it, all the cores simply have to run straight and parallel for a bit
 
Top