Inexperienced crew, yes or no?

srm

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The point of my rambling is before heading off on a trip in an untested boat with an inexperienced crew, take the time to have a shake down beforehand.
Very good advice that I fully endorse. However, looking back at the five yachts I have bought over the years in each case pressures of time resulted in the shake down being a 600 mile plus passage to my home port.
 

Charlie Boy

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Have a conversation with the owner, his wife and his son, pointing out best and worst case scenarios.
Even if you decide not to go yourself you will still have to have that conversation so have it early. Likelihood is that they will make a sensible decision
 

mainsail1

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I don't understand why you want to go 60nm offshore with all the extra risks that entails. The risk from Orcas is minimal at this time of year in that area. They are happily chewing rudders much farther South. Anyway, even if there is a small risk I would take it (as I did 2 years ago) and have a nice sail down the coast a couple of miles offshore, popping into harbours and anchorages each night or when the weather looks bad. Please remember that many, many voyages take place along that coast without even seeing an Orca. Oh! and if it was me I would take the son. Why not? he is 15 and probably needs a bit of a challenge. If he hates it and you take my route, you are probably only a few miles from a harbour. Good luck!
 

DownWest

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I did something like this a while back. Quite young and bought my own crew (1). The idea was just the two of us, but the owner decided to come too at the last minute. She was near 3X my age and a bit grumpy (I did say I was young..) and I had to overrule her twice in critical situations. It was not an easy trip... But, her cooking was excellant.
So, clarity on who is skipper. It does sound like the owner will defere to the OP?
 

dunedin

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Very good advice that I fully endorse. However, looking back at the five yachts I have bought over the years in each case pressures of time resulted in the shake down being a 600 mile plus passage to my home port.
There are a lot of RNLI call outs from that approach - and sadly plenty of boats a total loss on premature delivery attempts.
 

srm

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There are a lot of RNLI call outs from that approach - and sadly plenty of boats a total loss on premature delivery attempts.
Which is why I endorse the advice.
In my defence for each boat I had spent significant time personally preparing the boat for the passage and was confident in its condition.

Before commercially skippering someone else's boat I would always do a thorough inspection first. Start at the bow below deck and carefully work aft, then likewise on deck. Also, enquire about the rig's maintenance and history. On one recently coded charter yacht it had a storm jib, surveyor's box ticked, but no way that it could be set on a stay and no sheets or leads. On another charter boat MOB "horseshoes" were stowed in a deep cockpit locker, the owner was waiting for business grant funding to be paid before buying ready use mountings.
 
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shortjohnsilver

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As skipper you have all the responsibility here and realistically it appears that you are the only one with any experience. If it were me I would take another experienced sailor with me, who can share the seamanship and running of the boat aspect, someone who can stand a watch and has knowledge enough to step in where necessary. Should you become incapacitated for some reason.
 
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