Food and manners on board.

DannyB

Well-known member
Joined
28 Jun 2007
Messages
7,650
Location
Scotland UK
Firstly, let me say I like plain food, my wife described it as bland, but that's what I like, and when I have guests on board, that is what I serve. There is always plenty of it, however last weekend a couple of "friends " disappeared when in harbour and turned up some time later having scoffed a curry somewhere. On Sunday the cabin was stinking with the stench of curry, and I confess I made my displeasure known. A week later, I've just opened up the boat and it's still honking. This pair will not be welcome on board in future, and I wish I had told them to sleep on deck. It's not just that I dislike curry, but the smell makes me nauseous, and while I don't usually suffer from seasickness, I'm feeling queasy today and I'm still tied to the pontoon.
The people I invite on board all know me well, and my opinions on food are no secret, so do I have to spell it out to people that if they can't spend a weekend without a curry, they will be sleeping on deck or making their own way back?
Am I being unreasonable?
Actually I don't care, it's my boat and my rules.
Rant over.
 

RupertW

Well-known member
Joined
20 Mar 2002
Messages
10,208
Location
Greenwich
Yes, you are. If you serve up food that is to your taste not to your guests, that's not very welcoming. If they go out instead and then you complain more that is unreasonable.

But with all guests on board (and friends in general) there will be niggles and either their company is well worth it, or its not. I probably draw the line at smoking in the cabin but that's about it.
 

jerrytug

N/A
Joined
31 May 2006
Messages
3,778
Location
Lorient
Firstly, let me say I like plain food, my wife described it as bland, but that's what I like, and when I have guests on board, that is what I serve. There is always plenty of it, however last weekend a couple of "friends " disappeared when in harbour and turned up some time later having scoffed a curry somewhere. On Sunday the cabin was stinking with the stench of curry, and I confess I made my displeasure known. A week later, I've just opened up the boat and it's still honking. This pair will not be welcome on board in future, and I wish I had told them to sleep on deck. It's not just that I dislike curry, but the smell makes me nauseous, and while I don't usually suffer from seasickness, I'm feeling queasy today and I'm still tied to the pontoon.
The people I invite on board all know me well, and my opinions on food are no secret, so do I have to spell it out to people that if they can't spend a weekend without a curry, they will be sleeping on deck or making their own way back?
Am I being unreasonable?
Actually I don't care, it's my boat and my rules.
Rant over.

If, a week later, your boat is 'honking', and your ex-friends (rather a pity) went OUT for their curry, you must be imagining it, queasiness is often caused by mental health issues such as paranoia.
Perhaps your ex-friends (such a shame) knew of your psychological revulsion for spiced food (perhaps resulting from deeply repressed childhood trauma?) and decided to cure you, once and for all, by emptying into the deepest recesses of your bilges a takeaway 'doggie bag' of prawn vindaloo, extra-hot lamb byriani, chilli dahl and all the trimmings?

My advice: sell the yacht or face your inner demons. As a little boy, did you witness daddy doing something strange to mummy with an onion bhaji and some chutney ;)
 

MoodySabre

Well-known member
Joined
24 Oct 2006
Messages
16,768
Location
Bradwell and Leigh-on-Sea
Your boat, you rules but we would ask visitors what they didn't like and tell them what we like so there's no misunderstanding.

I'm not sure why your boat still smells after a week. There must be something still onboard.
 

Biggles Wader

Well-known member
Joined
3 Mar 2013
Messages
10,712
Location
London
Is it the after effects of the curry that caused the problem?From your post they had the curry ashore,so I assume they had a bit of Gandi's revenge?Im sure that could happen to anyone,whatever their culinary preferences.
 

DannyB

Well-known member
Joined
28 Jun 2007
Messages
7,650
Location
Scotland UK
Yes, you are. If you serve up food that is to your taste not to your guests, that's not very welcoming. If they go out instead and then you complain more that is unreasonable.

But with all guests on board (and friends in general) there will be niggles and either their company is well worth it, or its not. I probably draw the line at smoking in the cabin but that's about it.

Although a non smoker, I have no objection to others smoking, and the smell doesn't bother me, so I don't specify that visitors go on deck to smoke. However, the smell of whatever it is they put in curry does bother me, in much the same way as severe BO does. Garlic and spiced foods are not welcome.
 

stranded

Well-known member
Joined
3 Dec 2012
Messages
2,150
Location
Lympstone
What on earth did you serve them? It would have to be pretty awful for crew to go ashore and eat apart from you. Unless the relationship was already on the rocks? Personally I would be mortified if my guests* felt the need to creep off to get some decent scran.

*I think 'friends' is used too freely these days - someone you would discard over such a trivial matter would surely not qualify.
 

DannyB

Well-known member
Joined
28 Jun 2007
Messages
7,650
Location
Scotland UK
My advice: sell the yacht or face your inner demons. As a little boy, did you witness daddy doing something strange to mummy with an onion bhaji and some chutney ;)

When I was a little boy, onions came draped over a frenchmans bike, and I doubt if anyone in this country would have known what a bhaji was! What was wrong with good old fashioned local food? :confused:
 

jerrytug

N/A
Joined
31 May 2006
Messages
3,778
Location
Lorient
When I was a little boy, onions came draped over a frenchmans bike, and I doubt if anyone in this country would have known what a bhaji was! What was wrong with good old fashioned local food? :confused:

No offence I was just being flippant as is my wont. In London, curry IS good old fashioned local food!

Now quench our curiosity and spill the beans, what is the ultra-bland recipe you served on board which drove the crew to the Tandoori house :(
 

DannyB

Well-known member
Joined
28 Jun 2007
Messages
7,650
Location
Scotland UK
Your boat, you rules but we would ask visitors what they didn't like and tell them what we like so there's no misunderstanding.

I'm not sure why your boat still smells after a week. There must be something still onboard.

I always explain to visitors that the food will be basic, mince and tatties, chicken and chips, bacon and egg, type of thing and I try to cater for people with special requirements like vegetarians, but there seems to be a small minority of people out there, who treat food like a challenge, got to have the hottest curry or chilli, and then revel in complaining about how ill they feel after.

I think, because I don't eat this kind of food, my sense of smell is very sensitive to it. I've dragged the bunk cushions on deck to air them out, hopefully now the hatches are all open, the smell will dissipate quickly.
 

jonic

Well-known member
Joined
12 Mar 2002
Messages
4,106
Location
Solent
..and yet in your signature you are encouraging everyone to "eat beaver"

Then you would really have to air your bunks.
 

DannyB

Well-known member
Joined
28 Jun 2007
Messages
7,650
Location
Scotland UK
No offence I was just being flippant as is my wont. In London, curry IS good old fashioned local food!

Now quench our curiosity and spill the beans, what is the ultra-bland recipe you served on board which drove the crew to the Tandoori house :(

No offence taken I assure you.
On Saturday we had my home made chicken pie, which is basically diced chicken breasts in a pie dish with a couple of packets of Birds Eye mixed veg, I add a tin of Heinz cream of chicken soup as a sauce and cover it all with sliced potatoes. It goes in the oven about an hour out, and it's ready to eat by the time we tie up. I assure you that it tastes better than it sounds. Followed by bread pudding and cream for afters. All washed down with a couple of bottles of Chardonnay.
 

Appledore

Member
Joined
13 Nov 2011
Messages
809
Location
Bodmin Moor, Cornwall
I am allergic to Garlic in food, and if it's hidden, it will make me rather ill both ashore and at sea. My son can't eat apples at sea for the same reason.

If I was on someone else's boat I would mention this fact to them before the meal was prepared, and probably say for them to eat whatever they want, and I'll have a Marmite sandwich:D
 

CAPTAIN FANTASTIC

Well-known member
Joined
15 Jul 2009
Messages
3,310
Location
Bristol Channel
No offence taken I assure you.
On Saturday we had my home made chicken pie, which is basically diced chicken breasts in a pie dish with a couple of packets of Birds Eye mixed veg, I add a tin of Heinz cream of chicken soup as a sauce and cover it all with sliced potatoes. It goes in the oven about an hour out, and it's ready to eat by the time we tie up. I assure you that it tastes better than it sounds. Followed by bread pudding and cream for afters. All washed down with a couple of bottles of Chardonnay.

Just the sound of this dish makes me want to throw up; we all have different tastes and hosts should make their guests feel most welcomed.
 

Tony Cross

Well-known member
Joined
14 Jan 2013
Messages
7,993
Location
Agios Nikolaos, Crete
I always explain to visitors that the food will be basic, mince and tatties, chicken and chips, bacon and egg, type of thing and I try to cater for people with special requirements like vegetarians, but there seems to be a small minority of people out there, who treat food like a challenge, got to have the hottest curry or chilli, and then revel in complaining about how ill they feel after.

I think, because I don't eat this kind of food, my sense of smell is very sensitive to it. I've dragged the bunk cushions on deck to air them out, hopefully now the hatches are all open, the smell will dissipate quickly.

No offence taken I assure you.
On Saturday we had my home made chicken pie, which is basically diced chicken breasts in a pie dish with a couple of packets of Birds Eye mixed veg, I add a tin of Heinz cream of chicken soup as a sauce and cover it all with sliced potatoes. It goes in the oven about an hour out, and it's ready to eat by the time we tie up. I assure you that it tastes better than it sounds. Followed by bread pudding and cream for afters. All washed down with a couple of bottles of Chardonnay.

That sounds like proper boaty food to me, I don't see their problem.
 

jerrytug

N/A
Joined
31 May 2006
Messages
3,778
Location
Lorient
No offence taken I assure you.
On Saturday we had my home made chicken pie, which is basically diced chicken breasts in a pie dish with a couple of packets of Birds Eye mixed veg, I add a tin of Heinz cream of chicken soup as a sauce and cover it all with sliced potatoes. It goes in the oven about an hour out, and it's ready to eat by the time we tie up. I assure you that it tastes better than it sounds. Followed by bread pudding and cream for afters. All washed down with a couple of bottles of Chardonnay.

Mouthwatering, but may I propose a little seasoning:
 
Top