Flocoating?

bigwow

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I’ve just fitted a mahogany frame on which to mount a generator, I epoxied it down, then used epoxy and tape round all the joins to the fibreglass base. I fancy flocoating the whole area in which the genny will site. The question is, I know the flocoat will adhere to the suitably abraded fibreglass; will it stick to the epoxied tape areas as well? I’ve already scotchbrited off the amino bloom.
 

oldsaltoz

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If you plan to use a standard poly flow coat you will need to establish a very good and clean key, standard poly resins do not stick to epoxy resins very well.

If you are using an epoxy flow coat you will have no problems, epoxy sticks well to poly reins also.

Tip: When epoxy is to coated, it's a good practice to wash it in fresh running water, starting at the top and work down, rubbing with a plastic kitchen scourer (Scotch-Brite) till the water no longer beads. This ensures the contamination left by the curing process has been removed.

If you sand before you only spread the contamination and risk a reduction in adhesion.

Hope this helps.

Avagoodweekend......
 

ShipsWoofy

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John,

When you have done this may I come an have a peep, I am looking for a way to paint some bare GRP in our heads. I have never seen nor heard of this flocoat, and google is not being my friend today. I would really like to see how this stuff looks when applied.

Can you paint it on vertical even adverse surfaces?
 

leomagill

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Polyester flowcoat is just a thicker form of laying-up resin, usually with a pigment, it hangs better on vertical surfaces and gives a smoother finish due to leaving a thicker layer.
 

ShipsWoofy

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If you are painting it thick (which I presume it is compared to normal paint) what stops it flowing and leaving those horrible waves on the surface?
 

bigwow

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I’m giving it a go next week. It depends how it turns out whether you can come and see the finished job! /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
 

oldsaltoz

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[ QUOTE ]
If you are painting it thick (which I presume it is compared to normal paint) what stops it flowing and leaving those horrible waves on the surface?

[/ QUOTE ]

When applied on a vertical surface it will follow the profile, this means it will have high and low spots, but all the fine detail of raw glass is lost, leaving a smooth easy to wipe clean surface.

On horizontal surfaces it tends to fill and low areas giving a smoother surface, the average thickness would be around 0.5 mm.

Apply with a roller for rapid coverage, apply with a wide brush if you need more depth or roll on two coats (best method).

Tip:
Most flow coats contain around 50% solids including colour pigment, so add a little less catalyst/hardener or it will go off very quickly. For poly add around 1% catalyst.

Hope this helps.

Avagoodweekend......
 

santeana

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So, oldsaltoz, with appropriate prep is an epoxy flow coat an option to peeling/re gelcoating or painting hull topsides? Thanks. (Apologies bigwow for slight drift).
 

ShipsWoofy

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[ QUOTE ]
I’m giving it a go next week. It depends how it turns out whether you can come and see the finished job! /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

[/ QUOTE ]That's the whole point, I would like to see it good or bad, otherwise I might end up buying something that looks rubbish..

I promise I'll be good on your boat /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
 

ShipsWoofy

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It does thank you.

Presumably you can build up coats, can you put the next coat on when the applied goes tacky, much like painting with or using resin. I have had ok results painting with resin, but the finish is quite soft and is really easy to mark.
 

oldsaltoz

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[ QUOTE ]
So, oldsaltoz, with appropriate prep is an epoxy flow coat an option to peeling/re gelcoating or painting hull topsides? Thanks. (Apologies bigwow for slight drift).

[/ QUOTE ]

Gelcoat and flow coat are all but the same product, Gel coat needs to set inside a mould so does not need added wax, that's why you have to cover it with plastic when repairing.

Flow coat on the other hand has the wax added so will go off much like paint, as for using to coat your topsides, probable not a good idea, the finish will not be as level as paint and will be a lot thicker, so any non slip areas would be of little help after coating.

Good use of flow coat are areas like engine room walls and bilges because although not level, it is smooth so cleaning is made easy.

If you need a lot of thickness (I can't see why) you can apply wet over tacky to avoid the dreaded sanding between coats, just use a light presure, a heavy hand may distort the first coat if not cured.

I hope this helps.

Avagoodweekend......
 

rogerthebodger

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A local supplier in South Africa has an epoxy flowcoat that is ceramic filled I used to to get a very smooth and hard finish on the bilge of my steel boat. It is also used to paint the inside of old cast iron bath tubs when the enamel finish is damaged to renovate them
 

William_H

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A classic and common use for flow coat (polyester) is where a boat has come out of a mold. The outside is beautiful gel coat but the inside (last layer applied) is rough polyester and fibreglass. The flow coat is painted on to smooth over the rough glass and colour the surface (white).

So flow coat being thick is great to make rough surfaces a bit smoother and a bit more professional looking. But is no where near as good as a decent paint on an already smooth surface. olewill
 
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