Finally done it

russ

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Finally done it. Got me boat after 1 1/2 rears of searching, forum questions and sea trials.
Couple of knocks trying to moor and I unfortunately gave some raised voiced comments to my wife and son.(Sorry)
Not actually done a lock yet but will tomorrow so keep clear. A bow thrusters probably the answer.
Still two more full days of practice to go.
 
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russ

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Congrats mate. Welcome to the ranks of the permanently brassic

Don't I know it. Two fire extinguishers, one bilge water filter, one bilge fan, life jackets,plates,cups,glasses,fenders etc etc. Thats before I left the mooring. Oh and a full engine and leg service and A/F next week.
 

Dave_Seager

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Bow Thruster

Don't rush into spending your money on a bow thruster until you get to know your boat properly. Although they obviously make boat handling easier, they are not esssential. Most of us have been boating for years without them. There is a lot of satsfaction in learning to handle a boat properly You need to understand how your boat reacts and to read the wind and water to plan your manoeuvres.

By the way, what is the new boat and where are you based?
 

russ

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Don't rush into spending your money on a bow thruster until you get to know your boat properly. Although they obviously make boat handling easier, they are not esssential. Most of us have been boating for years without them. There is a lot of satsfaction in learning to handle a boat properly You need to understand how your boat reacts and to read the wind and water to plan your manoeuvres.

By the way, what is the new boat and where are you based?
Cheers Dave
We went through Shepperton and Chertsey locks and back today. The lock keeper suggested hooking up the stern before the bow. Tried that and then the bow went off. Any comments greatly received.
The boat is an 05 Bayliner 265 with duo prop.
 

byron

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Cheers Dave
We went through Shepperton and Chertsey locks and back today. The lock keeper suggested hooking up the stern before the bow. Tried that and then the bow went off. Any comments greatly received.
The boat is an 05 Bayliner 265 with duo prop.

Bow in first at the finest angle you can get. Bow line on (not too tight), turn the Leg so it is facing the wall of the Lock. Gently go astern and you will fill the stern come in. Disengage gear soon as you feel this and just put your stern line on.
 

No Regrets

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The last sports cruiser we had used to respond very well to nosing in towards the lock bollard at a steep angle, and then at the last minute reversing with the sterndrive facing into the side we were hooking up to.

This had the result of pulling the stern in, and stopping the boats forward progress at the same time.

Bear in mind boats tend to steer around a central axis, it pays to get the bows really close to the side, so close that you can usually simply drop the line over the bollard, and bear in mind also, the front linesman has to allow for the bows correcting themselves as the rear pulls in.

Worked every time, and usually drew if not gasps of admiration, a few nice comments...

A shallow angle makes it harder for the chap on the front to hook up, as the narrow front on this design of boat leaves a large gap betwixt pointy bit and nearest bollard!

Even if you are stationary, full lock and a bit of forward thrust can place the bollard closer for a moment, and then reverse pulls the stern in, so you can casually wander to the rear and loop yours over.

Not saying Byron isn't spot on, but this worked spectacularly well for us! Good for poor rope throwing types too!
 

byron

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Thank you. I will give it another go tomorrow and see which works best for my boat.
Why do you think the lock keeper said hook up the stern first?

It is possible to hook the stern line on, very slowly go ahead with the leg barely pointed to the lock wall then just hook on the bow line. It does require two crew to do this properly whereas the method No Regrets and myself recommend just requires someone on the bow line and you doing the stern line.
 

No Regrets

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With a stern drive, the stern is sooooo controllable, yet the bows have a mind of their own, depending on the wind and current.

Sod the stern, you have much control, unless you take the soft pussy route and get a bow thruster!

I don't want a bow thruster, never needed one!
 

Mashby

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Hi Russ

Congrats on the new boat hope it gives you lots of years of fun.

I retrofitted a bowthruster to our boat I don't use it much but my old man does. It gives him great piece of mind.
And when the wind is up Im very grateful for it.

So if you think it will give you piece of mind and enjoy boating more go and get one. The older generation seem to think its cheating however thats what technology is for to make our lives easier.

Cheers
Matt
 

russ

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Oh dear! up set the Mrs today when we lost control in the lock. Took a few knocks, more fenders required.
Pretty pleased with myself when mooring near hampton court, so improving as we go.
 

No Regrets

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Go and find a quiet spot, and practise at your leisure.

Teach the bow person how to lob a line (Hold end, and throw pre-coiled section, using weight of it as free inertia, perhaps flicking it over a slightly missed bollard, never bother with anything less than full coil of rope)

Let them know clearly when you think they should throw, and onto which exact bollard, this is essential, not optional!

Once they are fastened, your job is to place the stern of the boat close to your chosen bollard, no need to pay any more attention to the bows, they're sorted, and fasten up using the whole coiled rope.

Job done.

So, place the bows at a steep angle very close to the bollard, reverse on full lock to place the stern as soon as they are sorted, then fasten up yourself.

You'll soon get competent!

Prior rope coiling is also important, as it's no use your linesperson messing about coiling ropes while the bollard 'drifts away' if you know what I mean!

Plan every mooring as you approach, and issue clear instructions in a loud voice, in a language your partner understands (i.e. 'Lines' 'Port' Starboard' may need to become 'Ropes, Left and Right')
 

jecuk

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Best advice I ever got was that if all else fails stop the boat. Can't get into too much trouble stationary even if there is wind and you are in a light boat.
 

Captain Coochie

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As others have said practice is the key . Holding station is a great way to learn about your boat and what it wants to do . Pick a point on the bank and see if you can just sit in the same place on the river ( using the anchor is cheating :D )
While teaching your good lady to obey the orders you are barking from the wheel you could always do it the easy way . Going into the stream hook the bow line over the bollard and let the stern drop into place . Going down river hook the stern line over the bollard and let the bow drop into place . Its probably not as much fun as shouting orders but its easier :)

Ive just read the whole thread and notice that the lock keeper also gave this advice but your not sure why .
What you are doing is using the river to control the boat not using force . By hooking a line over a bollard and not pulling the boat in too tight the flow of the water will point you in a straight line .
If you think about how a boat is shaped then you will understand why the water will push you into as straight line by just keeping one point on the boat in a fixed place . Slow and easy is the key .
 
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Sometime

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I was new to boating last year and had similar experiences in locks and it was really putting me off. I did consider going out and practising over and over but I felt if I didn't practise the correct technique this wouldn't help me too much. I therefore decided to do the Inland Helmsman course (I used Martin) and it was the best thing I ever did.
I am still very much a novice and my advice when doing anything is just do it slowly.
 
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