Drying out against a wall in a fin keel Westerly Tempest

CaptainBob

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Was this meant to happen?

lr6.jpg


As the tide went out we slowly settled back until the rudder took the load.

Is the rudder designed to take that kind of load?

Should we have moved heavy objects forward to avoid this, or used warps? Or?

We really should have faced the other way then we'd have been leaning far less as the harbour had a little bit of a slope which didn't help.

TY!
 
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Searush

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Yes, of course the keel is designed to take the load. Just look at the boats stored over winter, side braces are simply that, braces to stop it falling over, the weight of the boat is supported by the keel.

Wooden boats left ashore for several years can dry out & hog as the hull sags, but no boat will be damaged by a month or 6 sitting on its keel(s).

Rotate her on the next tide & she may sit better. Most people set up their boats with water tubs, anchor & chain etc along the deck nearest the quay to make sure she leans in rather than out. :eek:
 

CaptainBob

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Yes, of course the keel is designed to take the load. Just look at the boats stored over winter, side braces are simply that, braces to stop it falling over, the weight of the boat is supported by the keel.

Wooden boats left ashore for several years can dry out & hog as the hull sags, but no boat will be damaged by a month or 6 sitting on its keel(s).

Rotate her on the next tide & she may sit better. Most people set up their boats with water tubs, anchor & chain etc along the deck nearest the quay to make sure she leans in rather than out. :eek:

On land in a cradle, the bottom of our rudder is over a foot off the ground, always has been, so wasn't sure. Thanks for clearing that up.

We used the main halyard to pull it over as we went down, but it did involve keeping up with it with the winch.

Ta
 

Searush

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Is the rudder on the ground and are you asking if the rudder is designed to take the load?

My twin keeler (an elderly Westerly Pentland) sits on the keels only on hard ground, but in softer ground, the rudder often touches & shares some of teh weight, This has been happening twice a day for the 23 years I have had it without a problem. i doubt the rudder would carry much of the load.
 

Tom Price

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[QUOTE=CaptainBob: "We used the main halyard to pull it over as we went down, but it did involve keeping up with it with the winch."

In the right position she will lean against the wall and a short strop ashore with snatch block onto shroud or main halyard will enable you to enjoy a leisurely pint or three.
The golden rule is to survey the bottom at LW, otherwise there's only oneself to blame.
 

clyst

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Was this meant to happen?

lr6.jpg


As the tide went out we slowly settled back until the rudder took the load.

Is the rudder designed to take that kind of load?

Should we have moved heavy objects forward to avoid this, or used warps? Or?

We really should have faced the other way then we'd have been leaning far less as the harbour had a little bit of a slope which didn't help.

TY!

Looks like a tsunami has hit the area . Is it Bridport ??
 

conor54

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DSC00062.JPG


I kept my rudder quite safe by drying out like this! As the tide went out I tried moving weight aft but it had little effect. What stopped the bow going even further was a warp to the quay. I put it through the fairlead in the coaming, but if I was doing it again I'd probably put the warp through the coamings and right around under the bow for peace of mind.

I was drying out to service a weeping seacock at the heads. An awkward job made more awkward by the angle and nervous feeling brought on by the various creaks as she settled further.
 

Seajet

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The golden rule is to survey the bottom at LW

So true, as well as the seabed contours one never knows if some idiot has chucked in a shopping trolley or worse.

My 30' fin keeler turned out to settle very badly stern down, even on a level drying out pan; a case for a few quick lines round the stern ( I wouldn't trust the aft mooring cleats for such a load from an unusual angle, if any ! )

There is the odd boat which I was told can't dry out on their keel, the Listang 25 being one but I stand to be happily corrected.

th_Avalondriedout-2.jpg
 
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CaptainBob

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Thanks for all of the replies.

We arrived in the harbour after having phoned ahead. The pilot said the HM was keen for sailing boats to come in, and would assist non-shoal-draft boats in drying out. The HM confirmed this. He told us exactly where to go and suggested the halyard technique, then left us to it. We had no chance for a survey as it was our first time in the port and the tide was on the way down.

Looks like a tsunami has hit the area . Is it Bridport ??

:) It's Lyme Regis.
 

Searush

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Thanks for all of the replies.

We arrived in the harbour after having phoned ahead. The pilot said the HM was keen for sailing boats to come in, and would assist non-shoal-draft boats in drying out. The HM confirmed this. He told us exactly where to go and suggested the halyard technique, then left us to it. We had no chance for a survey as it was our first time in the port and the tide was on the way down.


:) It's Lyme Regis.

A poke around with a garden cane, oar or spinny pole will help if unable to see the dried out area at LW. But TBH, that's why I like twin keels, there are a lot of drying harbours round our way too, & it's a shame to be stressed by them.

A line under the stern sounds a good idea to lessen the angle if there are no log senders or similar to snag on - and if you can keep it well clear of the prop & shaft. Have a good look around on the next LW & you should be able to decide what is best. Then next time it will be a doddle!
 

vyv_cox

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I can't help with your Tempest but my Sadler 34 almost always sits back on the rudder when drying out, either against a wall or on the legs. It's being doing it for years and doesn't seem to have done any harm. Mine is the shallow fin version in which the keel is only a couple of inches deeper than the rudder.
 

Searush

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Originally Posted by CaptainBob
As the tide went out we slowly settled back until the rudder took the load.

Is the rudder designed to take that kind of load?

Originally Posted by Searush
Yes, of course the keel is designed to take the load.

Don't be a prat, read the thread, if you can, and you will see that the OP was tired when he first posted & has editted his mistake. But why would you want to know the facts before pontificating?

It wouldn't harm you to help people rather than nit-picking wrongly
 

prv

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Don't be a prat, read the thread, if you can, and you will see that the OP was tired when he first posted & has editted his mistake.

Yep - I saw the first version and started to write a somewhat confused reply, then realised the OP must have made a mistake. I cancelled the reply and waited for the confusion to happen to other people :)

Pete
 

Searush

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Yep - I saw the first version and started to write a somewhat confused reply, then realised the OP must have made a mistake. I cancelled the reply and waited for the confusion to happen to other people :)

Pete

Higgy IS easily confused, he has tried on other threads to outwit me, & failed. But I don't mind, a little light exercise is needed from time to time. :D

OP does state that he will edit the first post, but one has to read the thread to see it, & most people can't manage that in their rush to attack. Bless 'em.
 

CET1

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Found from experiment when lifted by crane boat will sit flat on keel and that the fenders needed to be near the lifting points for maximum stability. We also have a larger ball fenders to prevent both the bow and the stern tipping inwards if the balance was not quite right. When posible, as in photo, we found that if we go stern too on a ramp we are more stable and able to move anywhere on the decks. Before touching the bottom we always make sure that we are tilited slightly towards the supporting wall.
 
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