Cutting thick planks.

Keith 66

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Beat me to it, Wood mizer Or Horizontal bandsaw mill will do it with far less wastage than a chainsaw mill & ,more accurate, Also worth looking on Arb Talk forums to see if there are any tree surgeon types who operate one
 

NormanS

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It's years ago now, but when I bought three large larch trees, I arranged for them to be delivered direct to a large saw mill. They cut exactly to my requirements. I think that guddling about with chain saws or anything hand held, will waste a lot of timber.
 

RunAgroundHard

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"Tips from a Shipwright" and if I recall correctly, but might be wrong, "Sampson Boat Co" have shown videos of partial cuts with a circular saw, finished with a hand saw. The ripped face is not going to be your finished face anyway I would imagine without further work. I have cut larger beams into sections, similar to what you want, from an old house that I demolished that way. I could only cut to 65mm depth, then finished the last bit of cut with a hand saw guided by the slot cut by the circular saw.

Don't try and force the circular saw to get a faster cut, just let it work with steady pressure. Use an aluminium / steel section clamped on as a guide.

Maybe you have it cut by now. Good luck with whatever choice you make.
 

Daydream believer

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On taking to local a sawmill, I could be wrong but believe places who have such machinery are very wary of cutting somebody else's timber, hidden screws/fixings etc.
Shrapnel more likely :(

If I had wanted to do that in my joinery works ( I did lots of different hardwoods) I would split the board down the middle into 2 --10 inch ones. This with a normal rip saw.Then it would go through my band resaw with ease. It would then go through the thicknesser better. If I needed wider widths I would probably reduce to 5 inch & laminate it to 20 inch again. This allows one to reverse the cross grain to avoid later bowing. It depends on misture content. Air dried Iroko machines much better than kiln dried & the grain has less stress in it.
 

Mister E

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If you use a circular saw with the guide clamped to the base you should get more accuracy than 1/4 inch.
Then just tidy up with the planer.
 

RunAgroundHard

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... how to cut the 25' x 20" x 4" plank into three 25' x 20" x 1" ...

I failed to understand that it was planks you were cutting out of the stock. The method I stated post number 26 would not work. In that case the wood mizer or band saw would be the correct tools. I think as Normans states a saw mill would be best.
 

deeb

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If you have a local pallet/casemakers near to you, they will have a Stenner resaw, this would make easy cutting and accurate, bung them a few drinks, job done.
Exactly this. A resaw is by no means an uncommon item, anyone processing largish volumes of timber will have one and it is the only way to get a nice consistent cut with minimal waste. Another consideration is dust: iroko dust is a significant irritant and anyone operating a resaw will have proper extraction, tested annually and safe for the operators. The width of your boards rules out most smaller bandsaws. Accuracy at this stage will save heaps of time. The bigger the machine the better.
 
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