Classic yacht outboard motor mounting

bobj903

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I cannot fit a transom mounted outboard on my IOD - the counter is too small and too far away from the helm. I know there are some boats that have side-mounted outboard brackets but I cannot find one or even a pattern for one to be made. Can anyone help please?
 

Peterduck

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I'm not familiar with an IOD; is it too large for Armstrong's Patent [ie, oars]? If it is plywood construction, a well at the stern end of the cockpit would work well. (Oh dear! A pun! Sorry!) If it is carvel, a well could still be built beside the horn timber provided that the planking was sufficiently supported internally.
Peter.
 

bobj903

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Peter

Thanks. It is a 10m mahogany carvel boat with two tons of lead in the keel and long overhangs either end. The transom is over 4 metres away from the helming position and so it is not feasible to fix a motor there. The whole concept of making an outboard well in a classic yacht is a step too far in my view.

There are side-mounted outboards in existence and this brings the motor within reach of the helm, which is what I am hoping to do. A drawing/photo from anyone would be welcomed.
 

Kukri

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I wish I could help more; I've seen this question asked, and answered, here, before, and I have seen Dragons and I think IODs with this set up.

One arrangement is to make a fairly substantial board that fits across (and is lashed to) both cockpit coamings - the motor clamps to this on one side. On a Dragon the coamings are low enough for a long shaft outboard to mount directly on the board but an IOD is quite a bit bigger and you might need a step down. It's a far, far, better arrangement than putting it on the stern, where it is vulnerable to pitching.

A much better arrangement if you can get the fittings is to fabricate a metal outboard bracket which ships into boarding ladder brackets on the topsides - the little bronze castings for the boarding ladder to hook into are quite substantial and will take the thrust of an outboard if duly through bolted to pads.. this method means less clobber to stow and you can mount the outboard at the right height.



Worth making it so that the outboard can be spun round by its own tiller to reverse.
 

DownWest

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Somewhere I have seen a set up with castings and screws so the bracket can be dropped into position and quickly locked. Followed by the motor. I have a feeling it was in Wooden Boat.
I will try a search there and get back.
A
 

bobj903

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Many thanks for the helpful pointers. There are some interesting options shown on the Wooden Boats forum under the same topic heading. I was aware of the Rustler Yachts option and spoke with them about sending me details and a quote (verbally suggested as around £750!) but have not heard any more from them. the Rigrite option would be great given its simple rigging but it is of course 90 degrees out which would demand some other tinkering that I have not yet got my head around.

But I do have some food for thought and will look at options. If I come up with a good solution I might patent it!!
 

cliffordpope

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Isn't the standard advice to steer with the boat's rudder, not the outboard? So apart from initially starting off, do you need it to be within reach of the cockpit?
 

bobj903

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Thanks. Yes, I looked last night and they have given me some food for thought. Maybe I want perfection but my ideal would be light, strong, easy to ship and unship, unobtrusive. I would also like to be able to somehow "fold" the bracket inboard so that the motor may be taken off (either on the mounting or off) from the cockpit rather than from the narriow side deck - a matter of age and agility!

I do appreciate that the "waggling stick" is the preferred method of directing the boat but if the outboard is full ahead but some 10 feet away and I want to slow or stop it does create a small dilemma! Also, the potential for using the directional drive of the motor in tight situations where the long keel reduces manoeuvrability is an added plus if within reach.
 

DownWest

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I can't see much problem clamping the O/B at 90º using something like the rigrite kit. Not sure if your freeboard is a problem for leg length. ( Phew! £700+quid from Rustler, I would recon to run one up for a days work, tops)
A
 

biscuit

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I restored a 1898 designed Bembridge Redwing and faced the same problem. I saw a picture of a bracket on a Victory (Portsmouth)one design in Classic Boat magazine and phoned Alf Perry,who looks after them & who helpfully described it on the phone. I had one made up: A s/s base plate permanently bolted onto the side of the boat, with 2 locating pins and a central boss, with a removable top plate with corresponding holes for the pins and central boss, having an outboard pad-all secured by a simple lynch pin through the boss. I cant lay my hand on a photo at the moment. The base plate was unobtrusive, and it worked ok.
I know some Dragons managed reasonably well with a simple plank secured by 2 G-cramps on the aft cockpit coaming!
 

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