Choosing my first boat

duidiver

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Good day forum members. I'm being allowed by SWMBO to buy my first boat!!!
I very close to the Menai Straits and I want a powerboat for messing about in, some waterskiing, fishing, diving and trips out with the family. I'd like to cruise the Straits and out into the bay. I can keep the boat on my drive but the better option is to use one of the boatyards locally and have them launch and recover, save my car clutch!
So far my shortlist is a Jeanneau Cap Camarat 755WA from 2006 with a Verado 250 engine (my wifes preference) or a 2005 Boston Whaler 210 outrage with a Yamaha 225 on the back, my preference.
My wife is liking the buddy cabin idea, for some additional shelter whereas I'm liking the Boston Whaler for its unsinkable bombproof simple layout. So are there any clear shortcomings or something else anyone suggests I look at. I expect to have to travel to get something as around here the preference seems to be bowriders, but I want something more seaworthy. I like the high sides, we have a 4yr old I don't want him falling out!
My previous shared boat ownership was speedboats on lakes and large Ribs for diving...
Any suggestions are most welcome
 

LadyJ

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I can't comment on the boat choice but I'm sure someone soon will. On the whole cuddy argument, trust me with a wife and a child you will get more boating and be 'allowed' the next boat quicker if you have a cuddy for them to shelter when the weather inevitably changes a bit from shore... My second bit of advice would be to get a bargain or at least a resell able boat for the first one as the second one will be along very soon as the first boat is more about what you want the next time (unless of course money is no object and you can afford to get it right first time....)
 

Vitesse

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We wanted the simplicity of a centre console too and probably couldn't do much better for our needs (hooning around and fishing mostly) than a BW. Heffin' expensive though, so ours is a 2000 model! Downside is it's lack of comfort and of course you're always exposed to the weather.

I think family boating is better when everyone enjoys it and what LadyJ says re cuddy is well worth bearing in mind.

Seaworthiness is desirable but realistically you're not often going out in anything snotty.
 

duidiver

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Thank you Vitesse, Yes I understand the being exposed bit, rather like a rib really. I don't mind that but I guess family would get ticked off at Captain Duidiver having his fun!
 

Kawasaki

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Yoh diudiver, you have made some good points in your Post
Both the Cap Cam and the Whaler would be great for your first vessel to ply the Strait and have some fun
Both better than most who choose to pick their first boats to do what you want to do
Here are the 'Pros and Cons' of the two vessels mentioned by you
You say you live close to the Strait and want to launch and retrieve
Therefore you don't need a Cuddy to kip in but swmbo is right, they are good to store things in and get some shelter
Then again, they can just become a 'junk room' which carp yer dunna need gets thrown into!
The 755 Cap is a good boat though and so is the Yam Verado
The Cap is a good hull and will cope with most of what the Strait will throw at you

The Whaler
Bullet proof
Outrage--outragesley expensive but like you say bullet proof
Again, a good tool for the Strait
Don't look at the Whaler if the Yam is a 'HPDI' engine, they gave trouble
The 'Outrage' is more 'ribby'like you are used to for diving etc , a pure sea boat as well and heavily built
The Cap is no duffer too M8
OK, the fixtures and fittings, ie the cleats and stuff, and all round 'metal' bits will be more substantial than the Cap, that's a 'Given'
It's a more 'Rufty Tufty' boat in respect.
You mention the 'Seaworthieness' (is that a word!) of the Whaler, yep right
Proper boats they are
Stand a right good bashing
You are right when you say 'peeps round ere like bowriders'
Hactually a lot buy these kinda 21 ter 23 footers which aint a good idea in some respects
Like yer Bayliners and Fletcher type things with a cuddy, which are a pain in the butt cos yer can't get forward to anchor, etc etc without going through a dam screen on to a slopey foredeck!!
Pain the butt those things
At least with the Cap you have the 'walk around option' to do what you have to do
To Sum up Sir!
Both are suitable for the Menai
Both good choices
Both good 'Makes' in their own right
Both of you would be pleased with a Cap 755
Both of you would be pleased if the nipper and his Mate's and hangers on could get some shelter in the 'Cuddy'
Both boats are good
However
My 'bent'or choice would be for the Cap
If for nothing else
'The 'Boss' seems to be that way inclined!
Plus
When you change your mind in the future as to what boat you think you need
Which you will do, we all do!
The Cap will be easier to sell
Because Wives think they need shelter, etc etc etc etc!
Then you can buy a bigger one, which we all think we need
But don't really!!
It's a bugger with boats, innit!
See you around on the Strait, no doubt:D
 

Sheppy

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Lots to think about there. I do agree that you'll probably want to change soonish as we never seem to get it right from day one, even with buckets of advice. But I would look for a cuddy/cabin and a walk around if you can. Harder to find but they do exist - a Karnic 2250/22260 would be an example, not necessarily a recommendation, just an example :) I would even compromise, and have, and will always go for a cuddy/cabin, else there's too many restrictions, nowhere to loo, change etc etc. They can just be used for dumping stuff too, which some will say is a waste, but it's better to have some shelter for when the rain comes in :)
Good luck and let us know what you find.
 

sprocker

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Just to throw something else into the pan.....have you thought about a Merry Fisher style boat? Excellent weatherproof cabin for inclement weather, good clear deckspace for fishing/diving, good seakeeping, various engine options, not the best boat for waterskiing but it can be done (two MF 645 around here pull skier/ringo regularly), reasonably priced. In my mind a very good all rounder.
 

duidiver

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Hi Kawasaki,
That's some really useful info you have provided, i think I will see if I can get the Jeanneau 755 cc that i've seen, it appears to be a good solid one owner boat with low hours on the engine (140) and service history. And I think i'll be along for some powerboat training with you guys too!
 

duidiver

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Thanks Sheppy,
All very useful info, I do see the sense in the buddy idea just didn't want to be carrying too much extra weight!
 

duidiver

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Thanks Sprocker,
I keep seeing the Merry Fisher style, often at good prices but it's just not for me...
Now a Botnia Targa..... MMnnnnnn but too expensive for now
 

duidiver

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Hi everyone, So the Jeanneau sold before I got to see it. I have a couple of others on my list and wondered what peoples thoughts and opinions were. Both are from same maker. The first is an Aquador 21 wa with a 175 Mercury Verado, so it has a small cuddy but no toilet or sink, the second is an Aquador 23 wa that has had Volvo Penta D3 200, that has more of the bells and whistles... I hear various reports on the D3 not being such a great engine in a boat, I've had several cars with this engine in and they were good. But I rather like the simplicity of the 21 such as it is towable and has an outboard but none of the extra frills swmbo wants! Both are around 2006 and of course the 23 i more expensive and no trailer! What are everyones thoughts, and advice is much appreciated.
 

duidiver

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Whatever you get make sure it's got a thunderbox ... she won't thank you if she has to balance on a rubber bucket while being pelted with rain and spray!

LOL what's wrong with hanging off the back!
So a fifty quid porta potty hidden under a seat in the buddy will suffice!
 

BruceK

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I'm not going to comment on any particular boat, but I recently went through the same trend you are looking to start. In my opinion if you are going to have a wife and kid(s) onboard, a 20-23 odd footer looks like it's got ample space until you are all trying to move around in it. Then it's like having a rugby match in the back of a minivan and tempers get a bit frayed. So factor in ergonomics and how the seats etc are arranged. I also had a porta potty. Yes they work, but the novelty wears thin quickly for the fairer sex when they have to squat with their knees round their ears. Trust me, the advice above was valid. Any cuddy needs good headroom, you'll find it's more the sun and wind kids need to escape from, so the cuddy needs to be comfortable, most are not. Yeah, we dont get much sun, but when we do get it we're on the water. Get something you can sell on. I went from 14 foot to 20 foot to 36 foot in 20 months or should that be from easy cash to affordable to colossal overdraft in 20 months? Mostly kiddy and missus practicalities, so try get a "big" boat in feel from the off. Moveable space (for dead cat swinging) should be a premium consideration if it's a family boat. Just my 2p in experience.
 

duidiver

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I'm not going to comment on any particular boat, but I recently went through the same trend you are looking to start. In my opinion if you are going to have a wife and kid(s) onboard, a 20-23 odd footer looks like it's got ample space until you are all trying to move around in it. Then it's like having a rugby match in the back of a minivan and tempers get a bit frayed. So factor in ergonomics and how the seats etc are arranged. I also had a porta potty. Yes they work, but the novelty wears thin quickly for the fairer sex when they have to squat with their knees round their ears. Trust me, the advice above was valid. Any cuddy needs good headroom, you'll find it's more the sun and wind kids need to escape from, so the cuddy needs to be comfortable, most are not. Yeah, we dont get much sun, but when we do get it we're on the water. Get something you can sell on. I went from 14 foot to 20 foot to 36 foot in 20 months or should that be from easy cash to affordable to colossal overdraft in 20 months? Mostly kiddy and missus practicalities, so try get a "big" boat in feel from the off. Moveable space (for dead cat swinging) should be a premium consideration if it's a family boat. Just my 2p in experience.

Thanks BruceK wise words
 

colingr

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We're living with a 21ft cuddy at the moment and have done do for about 8 years or so. Current boat has a porta potti which never goes on the boat as it is too cramped to use in the cuddy and as it gets bounced around a fair but it tends to leak. Family survive for a day out and it they're that despatate they use a bucket. I'm usually first to crack anyway :)

We're looking to upgrade as we want to spend more time on board and so want more headroom and a proper sea toilet.
 

Spi D

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New boaters commonly believe that features shown in brochures are for real. They are not - only features that work in everyday conditions count. Eg. toilets or cuddy cabins only accessible then crawling backwards doesn't count ;) If the cabin qualifies for overnight stays, the next natural need is a toilet, water and a sink. And a pantry.

Space is important to allow use, so if SWMBO desire one or the other for that reason the smart guy listen rather than try to convince her otherwise. Therefore the biggest, newest boat you can fit into your (investment- and operating-) budget should be considered early.

The Whaler is an icon in it's class. Not many built like it, but if it doesn't tick your requirements list that is not important.

All IMHO, of course :anonymous:
 
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