British Yachts vs Italian Yachts and Stability

Barbarossa

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Hi Everyone,

I would like to ask what the fundamental differences in the designs of British and Italian yachts.I am considering a Fairline squadron

42 or an Azimut 43 fly..After a compresensive research and consulting with the experts,I found that they always point out the fact

that the British make better seaworthy,solid and stable yachts whereas italian yachts are more eliborate in their exterior and

interior desing..Also, Italian Azimut seeems to have so much problem with its electric systems.

I know flybridge is a mediterrannen thing and was first used by mediterranean makers.But could the british makes such as Fairline

can be at par with italian flybridges?

And lastly,Would you agree that a top of the line British yacht would be more stable and I would have less problems sipping my drink

in the yacht when crusing compared to an top of the line italian yacht...
 

PowerYachtBlog

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I also would follow that the stability issue is a load of **** too.
For example Azimut has used Bernard Olsenski in the past, the old 90s produced 43, 40, 36, 50 & 54 all had his signature.
It is also true that the best planning hull evolutions in the last fifty years after Raymond Hunt invented the deep vee in the late 19fifties did came from Italy. Renato Sonny Levi 60/70s, Fabio Buzzi 80/90s, and Victory Design 90s/new millenium.
The English built good boats, but if you want to go less commercial there is some Italian brands who actually offer better sea boats to this.
Azimut is a tier with Fairline and there electrical systems are usually of the same level, as is in most of the details. You get good quality but definitly not the best. I have seen Cabo Yachts, Carolina Classic, Hatteras that had super quality systems. I think for the best EC systems some US builders are indeed a step ahead.
To be correct both 42 Squadron and Azimut 43 have a similar medium Vee hull aft. 14 degrees deadrise the AZ43, 12 deg the Fl42 Squadron. Theory speaking would make the Azimut a better boat but in my experience degrees alone can never say a boat is better then another.
 

MapisM

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After a compresensive research and consulting with the experts
Wow, and after all that you're asking the views to unknown folks on a web forum to make up your mind?
Sounds like a troll, if I've ever seen one.
If it isn't, well, my personal answer to your question is that you'll have exactly the very same problems when sipping your drink in either of those boats. I'd rather focus on the quality of the drink instead. :)
Oh, and welcome to the madhose!
 
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Deleted User YDKXO

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No this theory is rubbish. I have owned Fairline and Princess flybridge boats and also Azimut and Ferretti flybridge boats. Of all of them I consider the Ferretti slightly more stable at sea but thats mostly due to their wide beam and heavy weight IMHO. Otherwise you wont find any major differences. They all slam into head seas and they all romp over following seas. Buy what boat you like because they'll all feel much the same at sea
 

Barbarossa

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Thank you very much for quick responses.I really appreciate it.Is it really impossible to generalize, up to a certain extent, the differences between British and other makes??

I am looking to get a stable boat with a solid hull.Interior design is not my priority.Even the most skippers and engineers I talked so far have different opinions as to the differences between hull design,solidness of British and Italian Yachts.They talk about the displacement being the important factor on the stability..

Are there really scientific criteria that could help estimate the seaworthiness of a yacht?

I apologize if my questions are so amateur,I just started learning about boats.

Thank you
 
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Deleted User YDKXO

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Are there really scientific criteria that could help estimate the seaworthiness of a yacht?

The only 'scientific' criteria you can look at is the Recreational Craft Directive (RCD) category http://www.britishmarine.co.uk/what_we_do/technical/recreational_craft_directive.aspx that a particular boat has. There are 4 categories A - Ocean, B - Offshore, C - Coastal and D - Inland. The directive gives more info as to what these categories mean in terms of wind conditions, wave height and other requirements. Having said that, virtually all British and Italian boats you have mentioned will be in category B which bears out what I was saying in that there isn't a lot of difference between any of them.
If you really want to buy a boat which has the best seakeeping, you need to look at Cat A boats but even then there is a lot of difference between various Cat A certified boats. Some are still planing boats and probably not a lot better than Fairline or Azimut but some are true long range ocean cruising boats like this http://www.nordhavn.com/. If you want ultimate seakeeping then you really should focus only on long range slow speed displacement boats like Nordhavn, Selene http://www.selenetrawlers.com/index.php and Kadey Krogen http://www.kadeykrogen.com/ to name a few but this type of boat is very different to Azimut and Fairline. For example max speed will be 10kts or less and many are single engined
 
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Deleted User YDKXO

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Oi, how come you knew them?
Never seen any in the Med so far, though over the pond they're the real connoisseur choice, in GRP full displacement arena.

Because my SWMBO and I are starting to think about our next boat in a few years time when we want to do some more serious cruising and that means either a D or SD boat, certainly something that is capable of 1000nm+ at D speeds and the K-K fits into that category. Though I'm not sure whether I can bring myself to buy a D only boat as I still have this urge to slam the levers to WOT occasionally and burn some diesel.
Yeah you're right. I've seen Nordhavns and Selenes in the Med but not a K-K. Whats so special about K-Ks? Thats a cue for you, nautical:)
 

MapisM

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I'm not sure whether I can bring myself to buy a D only boat as I still have this urge to slam the levers to WOT occasionally and burn some diesel.
LOL, let me guess, you never tried a 60kts small speedboat with big block petrol engines on straight through hull exhausts, have you?
After trying that, I can assure you that the urge you mention will be cured once and for all, 'cause a large f/b cruising at 30kts will become as exciting as helming a supertanker on autopilot. :D
 
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Imperial One

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Oi, how come you knew them?
Never seen any in the Med so far, though over the pond they're the real connoisseur choice, in GRP full displacement arena.

Sold a Krogen 48 to a nice gentleman who keeps her in Monaco.
He is a resident there so gets to keep it in the locals harbour - about a millionth of the price of the visitors harbour I believe!

As for stability look at a Van der Valk Steel (or Aluminium if you want speed) with stabilisers or a Van der Valk trawler yacht....now that is a nice little vessel and will rival any Nordhaven for range, sea keeping and has a stunning interior built entirely to an owners individual taste and needs.

Where can you get one????:rolleyes:
 

gjgm

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No this theory is rubbish. I have owned Fairline and Princess flybridge boats and also Azimut and Ferretti flybridge boats. Of all of them I consider the Ferretti slightly more stable at sea but thats mostly due to their wide beam and heavy weight IMHO. Otherwise you wont find any major differences. They all slam into head seas and they all romp over following seas. Buy what boat you like because they'll all feel much the same at sea
How about at anchor?
Stable at sea means.. predicatable? Stable at anchor means not rolling about? Given JFM's stablisers, how stable at anchor can a 42ft boat be?
Just noticing he mentions sipping his drink...
 
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Deleted User YDKXO

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How about at anchor?
Stable at sea means.. predicatable? Stable at anchor means not rolling about? Given JFM's stablisers, how stable at anchor can a 42ft boat be?
Just noticing he mentions sipping his drink...

Well a 42 footer is going to be stable at anchor in a nice quiet bay but if there's any swell or wake coming into the bay, its going to be rolling all over the place and the OP is definitely going to be spilling his G & T. FWIW, my observation is that beamier boats roll less than slimmer ones. My Fairline Targa 48 rolled like a pig at anchor because of its narrow hull; my Ferretti 46 which was about the same length was much better because it was much beamier. The OP is never going to find a used 42 footer with stabilizers unless he looks at displacement type boats and even then, they may not be the at anchor zero speed type. I suppose if the OP is paranoid about rolling at anchor, the only choice is a cat.
 

Barbarossa

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Thank you everyone for the replies.To cut a long story short,I would like to have your personal preference between New Fairline squadron 42 and Azimut 43 fly.

Which one would you buy?

Thanks again
 
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Deleted User YDKXO

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Thank you everyone for the replies.To cut a long story short,I would like to have your personal preference between New Fairline squadron 42 and Azimut 43 fly.

Which one would you buy?

Thanks again

Whichever one you like best. You probably wont go wrong with either. One factor to consider is how close to your normal cruising area the dealer is located. Warranty problems will be easier to deal with if the dealer is close by
 
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