best buy?

Lucid

New member
Joined
18 Apr 2007
Messages
2
Visit site
Hello all, I'm new to sailing, starting to think of building/buying my own yacht... just doing some research and would like to know what would be the best option - GPR, aluminium or steel hull, for say a 25ft or smaller??

Also, does anyone know what is normally used to build the mast and stays?

cheers
 

Kawasaki

Well-known member
Joined
21 Jun 2004
Messages
11,729
Location
Anglesey Wales
Visit site
Lucid, welcome to the Forum.
First off be a bit more lucid and fill in Your profile it does Help to help You!
Steel if You know how to weld.
GPR I think You mean GRP?
Aluminuim-- not many built with that stuff.
Mostly little fishing boat type thingies, not many Yachts.
If You are New to boats why not get a used one first to get used to the Idea and see what You feel You want?
Wood is Good too, if You want to consruct one Yourself.
Glass Reinforced Plastic, GRP is the most popular nowadays.
 

William_H

Well-known member
Joined
28 Jul 2003
Messages
13,714
Location
West Australia
Visit site
One person described the cost of a boat as 1/3 hull 1/3 sails and rigging and 1/3 engine electrics and comforts.
Now the point is that any savings in hull construction ie 1/2 hull cost means 1/6 total cost.
When you come to sell however it is the hull that is the boat. So the best bet is if you want to build then buy a recognised and popular hull and finish it yourself. The boat can always be sold as a genuine type production boat that is the hull. But if you have a home made wooden hull (steel or ferro cement or even aluminium it is not recognisably a production boat.

However with the cost of oil (the material that fibreglass resin is made of, new boats (even the hull) are horendously expensive. Yet an old boat is much cheaper.

So there is no contest that a second hand old fibreglass boat gets you much more boat for you pound than a new one. GRP fibreglass virtually lasts forever and old is still very good. Unlike old wood or steel. Yes GRP is more expensive even old but will be much easier to move on if you so desire. Or more desirable to keep.
good luck olewill
 

Lakesailor

New member
Joined
15 Feb 2005
Messages
35,237
Location
Near Here
Visit site
They're all right. If you've not had a yacht there are so many issues that you won't be able to resolve as a builder, because you've not experienced them as an owner.
It will be a still-born project, festering in your garden for years.

Buy a decent little GRP boat and get the enthusiasm first.
 

Birdseye

Well-known member
Joined
9 Mar 2003
Messages
28,159
Location
s e wales
Visit site
[ QUOTE ]

When you come to sell however it is the hull that is the boat.

[/ QUOTE ]

Quite wrong - go to a boat show and watch the boats being sold by glitzy interior alone. Or ask your wife / partner. You will soon discover that appearance, interior fittings etc is hugely important. Its the men who sail on their own who seem to be most determined on the boaty basics of hull rig and keel.

Anyway, to materials. There is a limit to the weight of a 26 ft hull if the boat is to float, and you need a certain proportion of that weight in the keel to stay upright. That is the problem with the more dense materials such as ferro or steel - at 26 ft you struggle to get sufficient weight into the keel and still keep the overall weight sensible.

That leaves ally and frp. Ally is rare but perfectly good as a building material. Inherently expensive to build since it has to be individual rather than moulded.

The best choice is FRP and the best advice is to buy a class boat in standard condition since you are unlikely to buy the boat of your dreams first time out, and need to be able to sell it easily. So avoid the one offs, avoid the home built, avoid the aged and knackered. Standard Westerly, Moody etc is the best route for a starter boat.

All IMHO of course!
 

Channel Ribs

New member
Joined
11 Mar 2006
Messages
2,533
Location
The island of Alderney
www.alderneymarine.com
[ QUOTE ]
...starting to think of building/buying my own yacht...

[/ QUOTE ]

Buying is deffinately the way forward here, you should be able to pick up a 19-25 footer that has a good structure but needs some TLC for good money; that will give you a great platform to start working out your likes and dislikes.
 

Lucid

New member
Joined
18 Apr 2007
Messages
2
Visit site
Thanks all for your suggestions and enthusiastic replies - at this stage I'm leaning toward GRP (yes, that was a typo earlier)
 
Top