Beaumaris to Holyhead passage planning

fifer

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I've been flicking through the Cruising Anglesey Pilot with a view to planning a passage from Beaumaris back to Holyhead when the boat goes back in the water.

The pilot suggests leaving at HW Dover which is roughly when the flow in the channel turns North and you can catch the tide round past Point Lynas lighthouse.

The pilot also indicates that slack at Carmel head is at HW+5 Dover, and after this the tide turns foul.

How do people normally approach this passage? Its 25 miles to Carmel head from Beaumaris which requires an average speed of 5kts which is good going in a 27 footer, particularly if theres a delay in getting in the water or getting underway. Theres also the chance of the weather in early April being fairly inclement. I may have someone with me but I'm planning as though I'll be singlehanded.

Any tips?
 

Skylark

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I’ve done this passage many times, including a few single handed in a 41 footer in April, new season launches.

The critical tidal gate is Carmel Head. Pt Lynas is not particularly difficult. Carmel Head, on the other hand, needs to be treated with respect, pass through at slack water only.

There’s a fair tide for the entire passage from the Straits so making a 5kt average shouldn’t be an issue.

Cruising Anglesey and Adjacent Waters is the guide to use.

The north shore, from Lynas to Carmel can get a bit lumpy if the wind is >F5 with a north element. You’ll have an westerly setting ebb tide so a wind with a west element will give wind over tide. Passing Carmel Head at anything other than slack isn’t something you’ll do twice :)

Many people do the passage early and late in the season for a number of reasons. I’ve only once bottled out but that was due to a full gale. I’ve done it in light winds more often than high winds. The Anglesey Gods always try to ensure that you need to beat into wind regardless which shore and of direction of travel.
 

fifer

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I’ve done this passage many times, including a few single handed in a 41 footer in April, new season launches.

The critical tidal gate is Carmel Head. Pt Lynas is not particularly difficult. Carmel Head, on the other hand, needs to be treated with respect, pass through at slack water only.

There’s a fair tide for the entire passage from the Straits so making a 5kt average shouldn’t be an issue.

Cruising Anglesey and Adjacent Waters is the guide to use.

The north shore, from Lynas to Carmel can get a bit lumpy if the wind is >F5 with a north element. You’ll have an westerly setting ebb tide so a wind with a west element will give wind over tide. Passing Carmel Head at anything other than slack isn’t something you’ll do twice :)

Many people do the passage early and late in the season for a number of reasons. I’ve only once bottled out but that was due to a full gale. I’ve done it in light winds more often than high winds. The Anglesey Gods always try to ensure that you need to beat into wind regardless which shore and of direction of travel.

Thanks, that's reassuring. I'll have to wait and see what the weather looks like nearer the time!

I had then wind on the nose along the North side on my way round last October. I wouldn't be at all surprised to get it on the nose again!
 

C08

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I always used to be nervous about Carmel Head with an onshore light wind and so motor sailing. You are not far off the rocks and two coughs of the motor, too deep and rocky bottom to anchor quickly so lots of potential for mayhem. Perhaps just me.
 

peteK

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I always work on high water Liverpool which is more or less the same as high water Dover and aim too get there at low water slack and then a bit of flood tide too Holyhead but it is a bit nerve wracking with all the rocks sticking up if you take the inshore passage.
 
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