Babies and Boats

Way

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I know this isn't a new topic but the others don't really answer my question. I'm now the proud owner of a new baby daughter. And I really want to get her out sailing as soon as possible. My significantly better half is really keen for that too, which is superb. Quick 3/4 day trip to Bembridge from Portsmouth is on the cards.

But she is concerned about the temperature on the boat at night and the fact that it gets quite damp as well.

Is there anything I can do to allay fears on these two? It will be July so I'd say not really cold at all. And Id'say that with her in a cot in the middle of the cabin (Hurley 24) she wont be close to condensation etc.

Any tips or thoughts welcome...
x
 

sarabande

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the temperature range is going to be well within the normally accepted for small ones. Just add or take away blankets.

The relative humidity on board will depend principally on the gradient wind, same as on land.

I would have no issues about taking a newborn afloat in July - subject to not sailing during gales, anyway. It will make a great story for her as she grows up.


Post some pics when you get back. :).
 

sighmoon

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Congratulations.

2 of our 3 have sailed since they were babies. One slept superbly on board, the other, badly. I think it's the unfamiliar noises - the house is very quiet. Baby sleeping bags that they can't wriggle out of keep them warm at night. How damp is your boat that you're anticipating health issues?
 

sighmoon

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Do they require a lifejacket? If so, what and how? (I have recently become an uncle).

Yes. In reality, we tend not to put baby in a lifejacket for carrying along the pontoon because it makes them hard to hold when they're wriggling, and dropping them head first on a pontoon seemed a greater risk.

I don't understand your second question.
 

Kukri

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Crewsaver sell a flotation cot for sub-one-year-olds. We never bothered, reckoning we would just make a new one. (I don't think my 13 year old son is reading this... :eek:)

There is only one point to keep in mind - from now on, you are, in practice, singlehanding but subject to distraction.
 

pmagowan

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Yes. In reality, we tend not to put baby in a lifejacket for carrying along the pontoon because it makes them hard to hold when they're wriggling, and dropping them head first on a pontoon seemed a greater risk.

I don't understand your second question.

You kind of answered it. I was wondering if it was a special type of jacket, or a seperate cot. whetehr the bay wore it or was put into it in the event of sinking. I can't see how a baby would get overboard unless you chucked it in so sinking is the major hazzard.

As for damp on a boat, I would not think it is a significant risk to health. Ventilation is normally sufficient to solve the issue. temperature also unlikely to be a factor at this time of year in any sheltered spot.
 

Way

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Thanks everyone, really helpful.

It's the usual condensation damp. As I say, I think if we keep her away from windows then that should be ok.

She'll definitely be wearing her bright yellow baby lifejacket!

Yeah totally agree - I'm used to single handing our boat a lot so that's all fine.

Thanks all, will share some photos when we're back Sarabande!
 

bedouin

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Our elder was on the boat from 3 weeks. Slept very well in a travel cot - wearing the same baby bag he slept in at home - never had any problems.

In those days you could not get a LJ for babies less than 6 months so we had a "lifecot" that luckily we never had to use.

The most important thing is to have somewhere where they can be strapped in securely below decks. Our travel cot would double as a car set so straps to hold him secure - even when asleep - and we could strap that securely into the cabin.
 

oldgit

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My twin grandkids have been on our boat more or less since day one.
They are have now just turned two and are into everything,this includes pressing the engine stop buttons in mid cruise and pushing all the buttons on the navigation gear (a very satisfying bleep) until it gives up and sulks demanding a factory reset sequence.
The electric bog is also very interesting for some reason.
Digging raisons and bits of biscuit out between glassfibre panels is also an interesting task
A delight to have aboard......Go for it.
 

Way

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Brilliant!....great post!



My twin grandkids have been on our boat more or less since day one.
They are have now just turned two and are into everything,this includes pressing the engine stop buttons in mid cruise and pushing all the buttons on the navigation gear (a very satisfying bleep) until it gives up and sulks demanding a factory reset sequence.
The electric bog is also very interesting for some reason.
Digging raisons and bits of biscuit out between glassfibre panels is also an interesting task
A delight to have aboard......Go for it.
 

Iain C

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Nothing to add to the thread but congrats mate! Currently sat in the Isles of Scilly raising a glass to you all. Catch up soon!
 

KellysEye

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Little Rosie, a real sweetie, left the Canaries to cross the Atlantic on her first birthday. In July there shouldn't be condensation and as long as she is wrapped up well at night she shouldn't get cold if the temperature drops considerably.
 

mjcoon

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My twin grandkids have been on our boat more or less since day one.
They are have now just turned two and are into everything,this includes pressing the engine stop buttons in mid cruise and pushing all the buttons on the navigation gear (a very satisfying bleep) until it gives up and sulks demanding a factory reset sequence.
The electric bog is also very interesting for some reason.
Digging raisons and bits of biscuit out between glassfibre panels is also an interesting task
A delight to have aboard......Go for it.

Sounds like they need their own distraction devices for derfingerpoken...

Mike.
 

Shakemeister

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I have never sailed with babies or toddlers - though my experience of sailing alongside those with babies or toddlers is that babies are so much easier 'cos they don't move about as much. Toddlers however can be into everything and you should be putting netting in with your guard lines. Harness is more important than lifejacket.

As referred to above, you might find yourself sailing single handed cos when t' bairn's crying one of you will be down below.

I think Des Sleightholme said one hours sailing per year of age for toddlers and kids, with playing on a beach at the end of it makes for happy sailing.
 

sighmoon

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Toddlers however can be into everything and you should be putting netting in with your guard lines. Harness is more important than lifejacket.
You can of course get a lifejacket with an integral harness, which is what we've always done. We've had incidents of other kids accidentally undoing baby's tether when they are trying to move their own, for instance. It only takes a second to fall over the side.

I'm not convinced netting is a good idea. For one thing it provides only a partial solution, as you need gaps to make it easier to get on and off the boat, and at the pushpit. Also, if they get a body part caught in as they fall over, it could be quite gruesome.
 

Shakemeister

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The netting should be fairly fine so limbs can't go through.

I don't understand why you need gaps in the netting to get on and off.

As you say netting is only a partial solution.
 
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