Around the world, not.

itsonlymoney

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Before the 31march eh.....Good point, however if I start from say Ambleside and go as far as Ferry nab (about half way down the lake for the ill informed) then turn around and retrace my steps back again, would this be deemed a "circumnavigation" I think not and therefore rest my case...... /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
Ian
 

hlb

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The idea is not to use yer anchor!!

Anyway I'm going to the boat tomorrow so I'll plott a route into the plotter and see which way round the world is. If I've time I'll whip round, It dont look that far on my A to Z!!
 

Ships_Cat

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A solo attempt around the world non stop ex NZ via the North West Passage is due to start in April. If successful it will be the first time done, and is considered possible with the help of satellite imagery to avoid ice.

The route is Auckland, north around Australia (to avoid the head west winds in the Southern Ocean), round the Cape of Good Hope, across the Atlantic to the northern coast of Canada, then to Alaska through the Northwest Passage, and then back to Auckland through the Pacific - planned to take 150-180 days over 28,000 miles.

John
 

MedDreamer

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Re: windermere

You're up for it then? This would put some perspective on your little delivery trip last year huh! This one really is for the brave.

The wake from the lake steamers can create challenging conditions and when the wind gets up well.......er ........well it gets windy I suppose.

I've seen conditions on the lake that have made it impossible to moor up and get an ice cream in Bowness Bay....that type of deprivation takes a particular type of individual.

I'm already in touch with with my local DIY store ("Two Screws Jim") to provide sponsorship. He's alright about the flask and sandwiches but worried about the cost of transporting a 23m boat from the Solent.
 

itsonlymoney

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So does this meen that I was right all along and that there is a way to truly go around the world, not half way and then back again. And no one has actually done it yet, now that really is both a challenge and an acheivment to succesfully circumnavigate the globe, good luck to whomever is attempting this true "round the world trip"
Ian
 

Keen_Ed

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The World Speed Sailing Record Council (the people who ratified Ellen's record) specify the round the world course as:

. Around the World, eastbound and westbound
To sail around the World, a vessel must start from and return to the same point, must cross all meridians of longitude and must cross the Equator. It may cross some but not all meridians more than once (i.e. two roundings of Antarctica do not count). The shortest orthodromic track of the vessel must be at least 21,600 nautical miles in length calculated based on a 'perfect sphere'. In calculating this distance, it is to be assumed that the vessel will sail around Antarctica in latitude 63 degrees south. A vessel starting in the Southern Hemisphere has to round an island or other fixed point in the Northern Hemisphere but only once that will satisfy the minimum distance requirement.
 

itsonlymoney

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Thank you. A very informative reply.
As a matter of interest do you agree that this constitutes a "round the world trip"
Or as I state that it is a half way round and then back again covering at least the distance you would have covered had you done a true circumnavigation ?
Ian
 

l'escargot

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[ QUOTE ]
If you imagine a globe with the top most part 12o'clock being the start point then you have to pass through 3o'clock, 6o'clock, 9o'clock and finish back at 12o'clock.

[/ QUOTE ]

The circumnavigation is achieved by transiting the central point - the end of the minute hand and the end of the hour hand both complete the "circumnavigation" but cover different distances.
 

Keen_Ed

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To me, it's a true round the world trip.

You could say that the only true round the world trip is either around the equator - (which Mike Horn has done with his latitude 0 trip: details here), or a sort of double Michael Palin pole-to-pole: aound along a meridian of longitude and it's opposite - 0degrees and 180 degrees, for example.

Unfortunately, you can't do either non-stop in a boat - you have to get off and do a certain amount of walking.

However, you could take a line around the equator and tilt it, so that this new circle around the globe touches (say) Ushant. It would cross the equator at something a little less than 90degrees east, and again at a little more than 90degrees west. It strikes me that this is the course Ellen sailed - with two minor diverstions, a little hitch to starboard around the Cape of Good Hope to avoid Africa and Asia on the way south, and another hitch to Starboard around Cape Horn to avoid North and South America on the way north.
 

halcyon

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Based on that the Southern Hemisphere start must be the one to go for. As you only have to cross the equater, thus saving sailing down to it and back. Thats got to worth days of the record for no effort?

Brian
 

Dave_Snelson

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Well I suppose...

...I could undertake the "oil & gas rigs" tour du monde. Ya see, having filled up in Pwllheli, I could start in the Irish sea (Point of Ayr gas field) topping up on gas and head south, for um err...it starts to go a bit Pete Tong at this point...OK, so I threw everything overboard and fitted loads of extra tanks..

Next stop (having cheated and filled up on the south coast) northern coast of Algeria, than another short hop through the Med and Suez to Middle East (poss Iraq - but don't stay too long). Then S.E across the Arabian Sea toward India, where I fully expect BIGMOOSE can help me out. He is big in mineral mining, so he must have contacts /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Then on to Indonesia - them boys have loadsa gas, But my reserves of G&T will be running low /forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif

I'm also running out of ludicrously conceivable place to fill up. Any ideas on how to continue my journey?? /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
 

itsonlymoney

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Quote:
"diesel-powered craft covered the 24,382 nautical miles in 74 days - around three days longer than MacArthur has just taken to complete the distance in her sailing trimaran" How can a powered craft take longer than a raggie ?
This round the world nonsence gets crazier by the minute....
 

Dave_Snelson

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Ahh - those were the days...

I take it you mean the Cable & Wireless "Adventure".

cable_and_wireless.JPG


Built for C&W when we had £11Bn in the bank and we had money to burn, and we were a big company...once /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif

She was a stabilised mono-hull (rather than a tri-maran), built to a victorian design (yes, really!) and fitted with 3 diesel motors. She was capable of much faster speeds than she was engined up to do. Fact is she was built for distance and reliability and could cover >3000nm without refuelling and she cruised at 17kts. That's 17kts in calm weather, rough weather, force 10's - almost anything really.

Her purpose was to promote C&W around the world and she did infact stop at a load of ports on her way round the world, to raise awareness of C&W to countries that didn't know us so well and assure countries (where we are the encumbent telco) of our continuing support and commitment. Hence only 74 days.

I have been on board her at Salford Quays at the end of her first circumnav (she did two, y'know!) where we had a customer open day to crawl all over her, take many pictures, and then repair to a local hotel for loads of drinkies.

Ahh - those were the days.. /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif
 

itsonlymoney

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Re: Ahh - those were the days...

Ahh That answers it then. These circumnavigations, were they proper uns or half way round and then back again ones.
 
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