Anyone Know Navman 6500 Yellow GPS Socket Pin Out Details?

carpetsauce

Member
Joined
2 Dec 2013
Messages
48
Visit site
I'm trying to connect a Navman 6500 chartplotter to a Koden GPS 20A satellite receiver. I have an LT8 plug with its short length of cable with 8 wires which will fit the yellow socket on the back of the Navman chartplotter. I don't have the pin-out detail for the GPS socket on the Navman (i.e. I don't know the role of each wire). I need to know this to pair the chartplotter with the satellite receiver. However I do have the Koden wiring breakdown, so I know which wire does what on the Koden.
Information on pin numbers would be great, but the basic minimum information I need is the pin number/wire colour on the Navman that will connect to the Koden's: data output (+) (white); data output (-)/ NMEA out (green); 12v DC power (+) (red); and the DC (-) (black).
I know the Navman is an old instrument but it suits my purpose adequately. It works fine and it'd be a real waste to ditch it just for the want of the right knitting pattern.
Thanks.
ps - apologies if this post is a duplicate of the one I posted earlier. Newbie on the site.
 

carpetsauce

Member
Joined
2 Dec 2013
Messages
48
Visit site
Thanks paulajane,
I have a copy of the user guide but that shows plug and play connections within the Navman system architecture. I need wire to wire, since the Koden wasn't part of the original Navman 6500 system.
So if anyone has the pin-out details for the Navman 6500 yellow GPS plug I'd really appreciate it.
Thanks again for taking the time to give me positive input.
carpetsauce
 

carpetsauce

Member
Joined
2 Dec 2013
Messages
48
Visit site
Thanks for your drawing. Agree from reading the security instructions it it must have been NZ Commercial Super-Secret in its day. But it doesn't assign functions to wires unfortunately.
So if anyone can provide me an idea of the functions (eg NMEA + etc) for each of the wires I'd be most grateful. Otherwise the chartplotter becomes another ornament in the garage.
Thanks again for your assistance - appreciated.
 

Rafiki

Well-known member
Joined
20 Jul 2009
Messages
1,056
Location
North Bucks
Visit site
Providing you get the DCpower + and - right, then cant you just experiment to "see what works". I've done this before and it either works or it doesn't , no ill-effects from getting it wrong. Obviously easier to do this at home on the kitchen table, using small 12v battery such as those used in mowers to power up both bits of kit. IN fcat so useful is my mower battery it now lives on board and the mower has reverted to pull-start !
 

pvb

Well-known member
Joined
16 May 2001
Messages
45,603
Location
UK East Coast
Visit site
Thanks for your drawing. Agree from reading the security instructions it it must have been NZ Commercial Super-Secret in its day. But it doesn't assign functions to wires unfortunately.
So if anyone can provide me an idea of the functions (eg NMEA + etc) for each of the wires I'd be most grateful. Otherwise the chartplotter becomes another ornament in the garage.
Thanks again for your assistance - appreciated.

The second page of the drawing shows how the GPS connector is wired to the yellow plug which goes into the yellow socket of the Navman. The 4 wires on the GPS connector are connected to pins 1, 2, 3 and 8 of the plug which goes into the yellow socket on the Navman. I'd guess that pins 1 & 2 are 12v power. The Navman antenna is powered by the plotter, so it should be easy enough to confirm this - power up the plotter and see whether there's 12v on pins 1 & 2. If that's the case, then pins 3 and 8 are the NMEA connections. You'll just need to see which way round is NMEA+ and NMEA-.
 

carpetsauce

Member
Joined
2 Dec 2013
Messages
48
Visit site
Thanks Rafiki,
Yes, that's what I plan to do. I know the wire functions on the antenna, so I'll power it up like you mention and eliminate the other connection options one by one to the chartplotter. May have to strip the whole thing out to do it away from the console so I'm not working upside down, but that's boating.
Thanks again for your post.
 
Top