Yacht security

pmagowan

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On Scuttlebutt someone posted about a burglary while they were aboard and it got me wondering about security. What do you do to secure your boat?

I am thinking about all aspects;
Protection of those onboard
Protection of property
Prevention and recovery of stolen items
Prevention and recovery of stolen boat

Joshua Slocum sprinkled sharp tacks on deck at night to deter bare footed thieves. I am interested in all ideas ranging from the practical to the whacky.
 

Kelpie

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Short answer is, nothing. Not much of value left aboard, and you'd have to know the boat intimitely in order to actually start the engine and go for a joyride.
Last year we were sleeping aboard when we heard some neds clumping down the ramp to the pontoons, lauging about climbing onto one of the boats. "Let's go for that one, it's the biggest". We stayed silent, hoping they would pick a different boat, but sure enough a moment later felt the boat lurch as they clambered aboard. At which point our two dogs went absolutely beserk, and the neds fled into the night...
 

Carmel2

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The possibilities are endless.
Sorry for the re-post, but it might prove helpful..

I bought one of these to fit on our solar panels on the back http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mudder-Dete...l&keywords=Sola+Led+16+buld+garden+path+light It wasn't for security reasons, more for badly lit pontoons and a help at night when coming back to the boat at anchor, It lights up a large area from a reasonable distance, for very little cost it might deter the tossers.
 

Seajet

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I fitted a catch lever on the sliding part of the companionway hatch operable from inside or out, on, the recommendations of the 1979 Fastnet Inquiry.

It would take someone who knows the boat to spot it and open the hatch from the outside, and while they're scrabbling about I have the white flares, winch handles etc handy nearby ! :)
 

typhoonNige

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Lymington
I fitted a catch lever on the sliding part of the companionway hatch operable from inside or out, on, the recommendations of the 1979 Fastnet Inquiry.

It would take someone who knows the boat to spot it and open the hatch from the outside, and while they're scrabbling about I have the white flares, winch handles etc handy nearby ! :)

and if you are a keen fisherman like me there's always the 6' metal handled heavy gaff hook if you don't want to get too close
 

William_H

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There are some things you can do to improve security. Decent locks and lock fittings. Robust wash boards. (mine have been kicked in a few times)
Don't leave outside lockers un locked or if you do don't leave any sort of tools available for opening up hatches etc.
Don't leave outboard motors on the transom or if you must use a very heavy chain and lock. Around here they have been known to bring bolt cutters for liberating o/bs. I don't know of any risk around here of having the whole boat stolen from a mooring. Vandals may however just let it go.
Dinghies however are a big risk. Boats on trailers or just trailers are a risk of being stolen. Need some sort of lock.
As for protecting yourself when on board. Hopefully any intruder when disturbed will go away. If not then you may have a rocket flare to threaten them with. I would be scared if someone pointed one at me. Or knives of some sort. An internal latch on hatch might give you some better feeling of security.
I guess ultimately you need to keep an ear to the ground about thefts or invasions in your area and respond acordingly. But don't let the concern spoil your enjoyment. good luck olewill
 
D

Deleted member 36384

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Whacky: 12V car air horn wired up such that sounds if someone attempts an unauthorised entry; blank shot gun cartridge fitted to hatch, there is a device that you can buy which trips a hammer and detonates the blank shot gun cartridge; audible message that announces a warning that the alarm has been activated and notified the owner and local police that an unauthorised entry is being attempted.

On my own yacht I have the following: -

1. A stainless flat from the hatch to the cockpit sole (2" wide x 3' high x 5mm thick). It engages over two U bolts and is secured with high strength padlocks. The lower U bolt is teh one used for a harness attachment when leaving the companionway.
2. Each hatch has a bar that can be fitted across it, mid point into brackets on the cabin roof. The bar is 15 mm OD secured with a domed nut each end. The gap left between the bar an hatch prevents any entry by even the skinniest person.

The above will only prevent opportunist thieves. A thieve that has the tools would easily cut the stainless flat and a set of spanners and mole grips could undo the nuts on the bars.
 

flyingscampi

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This should do it. Ideal for boat/home defence in a liberal society.

Bundesarchiv_Bild_101I-219-0597-15%2C_Russland-Mitte-S%C3%BCd%2C_leichte_Flak%2C_Josef_Niemitz.jpg
 

BruceDanforth

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My technique is to give the impression of being a scruffy, penniless peasant with a small and ancient boat unlikely to have many shiny toys onboard.
 

pmagowan

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My technique is to give the impression of being a scruffy, penniless peasant with a small and ancient boat unlikely to have many shiny toys onboard.

That is my current technique but I have dreams (and plans) to make a more enticing boat even though I am likely to be more penniless when I do.

Some good replies, particularly with regards to hatch security. I have thought that it would not be difficult to make a laminated hatch containing a metal mesh so that even if it was smashed it would still be impossible to easily force entry. I was also thinking about methods of detecting an intruder and initiating a warning such as lights, sound etc. Since I plan to build an onboard computer thingy with internet access it would not be difficult to relay a message (my plans were for bilge alarms etc).
 
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Stemar

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My technique is to give the impression of being a scruffy, penniless peasant with a small and ancient boat unlikely to have many shiny toys onboard.
Likewise.

My boat locks, but is just secure enough to make it clear that getting in involved forced entry. There's nothing worth nicking on board - the instruments come home with me, so I'd rather they didn't do hundreds of pounds of damage finding out.
 

prv

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Around here they have been known to bring bolt cutters for liberating o/bs.

The tool of choice on this side of the world is reputedly a small chainsaw to remove a whole semi-circle of transom around the engine and whatever locks and bolts there may be :nonchalance:

Pete
 

prv

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I was also thinking about methods of detecting an intruder

A while ago I did find some microwave proximity sensor modules, as used in some car alarms. My thought was to mount one behind the headlining either side of the hatch, "firing" up through the deck (which I'm fairly sure the datasheet said they could). This would protect the area under the spray hood and around the hatch, which no legitimate person should be in. I didn't want to alarm the whole cockpit since there's occasionally good cause for someone to board an unattended boat.

It's a very very long way down my list, and I'm afraid I don't have a link to the parts.

Pete
 

Strolls

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Horace

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Not laminated, but you've reminded me of this, which might interest you:


What about the fore hatch?

For what it's worth I have a burglar alarm visible through a transparent wash board.Hopefully that will act as a deterrent because the hatch is unlocked to avoid extensive damage.(the burglar alarm itself ceased working last year)
 
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RumPunch

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Battery PIR alarm with 120 db siren fitted in the cabin. But possibly more effective are the stickers on hatches and windows saying it's there.
 

GHA

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Hopefully somewhere warm
Battery PIR alarm with 120 db siren fitted in the cabin. But possibly more effective are the stickers on hatches and windows saying it's there.

How do you rate the PIR sensor - any false alarms? On the to do list there is build an alarm system, after playing around with a PIR sensor they seem quite good but the worry is with one in the cockpit false alarms might be set off.

Anyone tried one in the cockpit?
 

RumPunch

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It's proved pretty reliable in the two months I've had it fitted. No reports of false alarms, other than one I induced. It can actually 'see' through the slight gap at the top of the washboards under the hatch. I went down to check something and it saw me and went off - mad rush back to car for boat key, but it reset after a minute. Rather comforting that I could still hear it a hundred or so yards away

I'm actually thinking of upgrading to one that calls you to say it's been triggered - still only around £60 plus a PAYG SIM card
 
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