Woodwork project - Gone wrong!

Scotty_Tradewind

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I have a lid for a teak box on my stern deck and the water ingress persuaded me to change it.
I wanted to convert the lid from a grating to a solid.

So without having a lot of router experience my son (cabinet maker) gave me a quick lesson in how he would do it.

I completed the work with near 100% satisfaction and the thumbs-up from son.
I cleaned off all of the original teak grating with acetone to enable the glue to adhere.

I decided that to better keep the water out I'd 'splash out' on applying a very liberal coating of teak oil even though the inlaid timbers were thought to be Keroin/Keruing.

Partway through routing
http://s725.photobucket.com/user/johnscottorn/media/2014-03-23 13.20.22.jpg.html?sort=6&o=10

Final coat of teak oil
http://s725.photobucket.com/user/johnscottorn/media/2014-04-15 12.12.34.jpg.html?sort=6&o=9

10 months later most of the inlays of Keroin have warped out of their glued in positions and have lifted both glue and woodfibres of the teak.

A grating of the cockpit floor was made at the same time in the Keroin but I applied no oil or other finish at all and has been without any problems.

Was the teak oil to blame and why?
(the lid was more vulnerable to the suns heat etc...)

S.
 
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MagicalArmchair

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This is why I am coating my cockpit lockers in West system followed by varnish with lots of UV inhibitors - the article below puts it quite concisely that you will always be battling the forces of nature. I thought teak oil did protect against UV, and shouldn't effect the glue...

http://www.westsystem.com/ss/varnish-over-epoxy/

It did look very good when you had done it... :)
 

Scotty_Tradewind

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Heat of the sun, I should say.

Hard luck after all that work.

Looks like you didn't choose the best timber as, according to the following website, it exudes resin and it's dimensional stability is poor. Also it's only moderately durable.

http://www.internationaltimber.com/range/hardwood-clears/tropical-hardwoods/keruing

Yes the website in your link does say ........
"High temperatures aggravate the exudation of resin, and care is therefore needed in order to reduce this to a minimum and also to reduce the tendency for cupping to occur", so I guess that is the problem/reason.

S.
 

MagicalArmchair

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Yes, worth keeping that photo and routing out the 1st attempt I guess.
I had thought of bringing the lid back from Galicia, but I was laden down with luggage as it was.
S.

A good excuse to make it again and this time seal it with something bulletproof :) . I did always scoff at people that put little covers over their varnished bright-work, but now it comes to it, I have contemplated cracking out the sowing machine, buying some sunbrella material and making little covers for my locker hatches to keep the ravages of the UV off them...
 

Scotty_Tradewind

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I like the idea of hatch covers, we have a simple canvas one over the main hatch, helps too to keep the

worst of the early sun away from us in bed ......although I've fitted a caravan blind with bug net inside so

can use that to keep light out too..... thankfully the nights don't get too hot in Atlantic Spain like they do

in the Med', although we did need the fans for one week.

I kept my budget low on boat purchase so I could DIY a lot more and get other fittings and gismos so

I've also had an all-over cover made that has a ridge just above the boom and then over my spinnaker

pole to the forestay. I can then store all my bits and bobs under there and it protects the toe rail and all

above from the elements for the 6 months of winter.
 
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30boat

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Woodworking can be very rewarding and I love doing it but on my boat there's next to none on the outside. I know it's pretty and traditional but in the old days if they had polyester and epoxy that's what they'd have used.
Down below I love the warm feeling I get from varnished wood but it needs no maintenance or else I'd find another solution.
 
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