Winch knurling

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I have Harkin winches and the knurling is virtually smooth, so much that it is not possible to ease the sails without the sheets slipping and almost taking your hand with them.
Does anyone know if it is possible to have them re-knurled at a machine shop and if so any spec for the depth and pitch of the knurling?
 

DickB

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Try these people. They re-chromed my winches last year and would have re-knurled if required. The main man there has a Moody something and knows boats!!!

AM Philpot (Hard Chrome) Ltd
Unit D, Cradock Road Ind Estate
Luton, Bedfordshire
LU4 0JF
Tel: 01582 571234
24 Hour Tel: 07831 276789
Fax: 01582 584924

http://www.amphardchrome.co.uk
 

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Thanks for the information but we are wintering in Sicily so would like some kind of spec to give a local engineering company.
 

sailorman

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I have Harkin winches and the knurling is virtually smooth, so much that it is not possible to ease the sails without the sheets slipping and almost taking your hand with them.
Does anyone know if it is possible to have them re-knurled at a machine shop and if so any spec for the depth and pitch of the knurling?
how many turns on the drum, do you normally use
 

PetiteFleur

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I have Andersen winches which have smooth vertical ribs - never had a problem easing the sheets with 3-4 turns - and they don't damage the ropes. Try with more turns and you may be surprised how much you can hold.
 

William_H

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Yes my reaction to reading this post was that the knurling does not really do much. I think my winches are quite smooth. I think it might be a question of not enough turns or wrong kind of rope. Perhaps the sheets are too big so you can't get enough turns on. Try a different rope. good luck olewill
 

PuffTheMagicDragon

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IF you do not eliminate the slipping by using more turns around the drum you could go for "straight line" knurling, as in parallel lines and not spiral or diamond shapes. This type of knurling leaves no sharp points, provides adequate friction and does not chew up the sheets. The available grades are 'coarse', 'medium' and 'fine'; for your purposes the 'fine' variety would be sufficient.

The turner should be aware of any taper in the drum body and adjust his set-up accordingly.

Ask for "Zigrinatura a linee parallele"
 

Norman_E

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Knurling on winch drums is more cosmetic than useful. Four turns on a worn smooth Harken winch drum will solve any slippage problem. Sharp new knurling will however rough up the outer braid of your ropes, so think twice before having it done. The Anderson winches are a brilliant design, with a gentle taper to the drum, so that as the coils of rope move upwards as you winch in, so they get tighter on the drum.
 

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Sailorman we are using 4 turns on the drum but have tried 5 which is the most we can get on, however with 5 turns it can cause problems with riding turns when winching
 

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William_H, It could be the rope, it does feel "slippery", I will get a new set of sheets and try that before anything else. We need a set of sheets for the cruising chute so nothing lost if new ropes don't fix it.
 

William_H

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Sailorman we are using 4 turns on the drum but have tried 5 which is the most we can get on, however with 5 turns it can cause problems with riding turns when winching

Over riding turns is usually caised by the sheet arriving at the winch from a point level with the winch or just above. The sheet should arrive from lower than the winch by a few cms at least so that new turns are forced onto the bottom. This may mean that the block for the jib sheet is too high or the winch needs to be raised on a spacer. You will notice all purpose made jib sheet sheaves are more like a roller kept very low to the track. Of course it may be that the drum is too full. good luck olewill
 
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