Which 8/9 HP outboard as auxilliary ?

markpageant

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I have a westerly Pageant 23 ft, displacing 4,300lbs. The old diesel is packing in and I'm wondering about which outboard to replace it with. I reckon about 8/9HP but I'd welcome views; I'd like an alternator to charge battery which has small draw and I'd like a long shaft. What is the concensus on 2 vs 4stroke and manual vs electric start ? Any ideas on price and good retailer ?
 

VicS

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An 8 or a 9.9 will do nicely.
You'll need a long shaft (20") An extra long (25") might be better.

Difficulty in reaching it to start it may make an electric start model attractive.

Don't count on much of an electrical output. 5 or 6 amps maximum and only at highish revs probably. You may need a rectifier kit for charging if it does not come with one

2 stroke or 4 stroke your choice I think

If you can get a model intended for use as a yacht auxiliary. It will have a long/extra long shaft probably, a suitable small pitch prop and probably a Dc output for charging.

You'll probably need to add a solar panel or wind turbine to supplement the meagre electrical output.

Remember that they are quite heavy to lift on and off a bracket.
 

retsina

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Tohatsu 10 hp (9.9 hp ?) 4 stroke 2 cylinder with electric starter and charger. Very durable engines and good price. Without any doubt 4 stroke for easy starting, any time, even when cold, quiter and by far more economical on fuel than 2 stroke.
 

retsina

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On second though; why dont you spend the money to repair/recondition your old dielsel or get a second hand diesel engine instead of fitting an outboard. The inboard diesel option will be better in the long term than an outboard. Good luck
 

Blueboatman

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10 hp will give you plenty of power and amazing agility and control for manouevring, far more so than any inboard.

Theft might be an issue.

The space freed up when you remove the engine, controls, seacocks, exhaust, tank, spares, propshaft etc etc..is astounding on a smaller boat. For instance the space below the cockpit makes a very good location for both a large watertank and 'deep' storage for spare anchors, sails etc.
You will have a quieter and cleaner boat too and save considerably on servicing and repairs to all those inboard 'bits', few of which ever seem to be priced in the real world !

Should you be thinking of selling the boat though at some time then the loss of an inboard might put off most 'typical' buyers, to the tune of several or many 100s of £s.
If it is any help I have removed the inboard from 2 boats, 21 ft and 28ft and swear by outboard simplicity and versatility. Lack of engine power has never been an issue . /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
 

AngusMcDoon

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Definitely 4-stroke. You will struggle to find a 2-stroke one new now anyway.

Yamaha have an excellent reputation. They do a high thrust version - 8hp FT8D. There are other excellent makes too of course.

Electric start is great to have, but not essential. Outboards of that size can be easily started by hand. You don't need split charging to separate starting/domestic batteries as hand starting is so easy.

The electrical output is 6A. This may not sound a lot, but for a small boat with small needs it is just fine. It will charge even at tickover. The big boat people here with their freezers and TV's and radars and bow thrusters and electric pumped everything will decry this as insufficient, but it isn't. They have probably forgotten how to live simply in a small boat.

I have used a Yamaha 9.9 for years as my main engine. I have had to replace one fuel pump diaphragm, but that's all. It always starts fine.

Mine has a 6A output which is supplemented with a 30W solar panel. I run a small compressor coolbox, all the normal boat electronics, autopilot, chartplotter, eberwhatsit. I have never run out of Amp-hours yet.

Evidence that it can be done...

My fridge...
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George...
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Map gadget...
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My engine (on a less than perfect solar day)...
Cambletown.jpg
 

yoda

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There is a long shaft 2 stroke 9.9hp mercury on the for sale forum which I think fits your needs well. Probably save you loads over the cost of new which in my mind equates to a bucket of fuel even if a 4 stroke is more economical.

yoda
 

graham

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I have an 8 hp Honda power thrust on our Coronado 25 . Gives 5.6 knots flat out usually run on 2/3 ds throttle at 5 knots.

Due to the powerthrust prop it has lots of grip on the water for slow speed manouvering.

The latest Honda 8 gives a usefull 12 AMPS at full throttle cables connect straight to the battery without need for a rectifier.

Ours has electric start and remote controls,I only use electric start if intending to run the motor for more than 15 minutes to save the battery.Remote control is worth its weight in gold.No more hanging over the back to change gear when manouveruing.



All in all does the job well is quiet and not to thirsty.

Have gone over some quite steep waves without the prop lifting out but that all depends on the hull design.I would guess that the Pageant would be ok.

I think your looking at about £1600 for an 8 with electric start .

You will need a good quality bracket with a strong spring to help you raise the motor as it weighs nearly 50kg.Ours can be lifted one handed easilly.

The other big benefit is the inflatable plus other stuff now lives in the old engine compartment.
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Channel Sailor

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Having owned several 9.9 4st yamaha's, I would not recommend buying an older 2nd hand one. After 5 years of use on the back of yachts, and no fresh water flushing, I started to have a few problems. Corrosion being one of them. The 9.9 4st's are much quieter than a traditional 2st, but not that quiet on cruise speed vibrating through the stern mount and pushing a good few tons on boat. But I guess nor is a diesel. Unless your yacht sails really well in light airs up and down wind, then I would avoid 2 strokes. High thrust features essential for manouvering in wind and tide. Yes, electric start especially is single handing or with children. Unless you want to go back to basics and buy an old pull start. If your normal harbour entrance is choppy, then remember the prop could well cavitate when you most need it. 6A of charging is not a lot but enough for simple electronics, but carry a cheap battery charger for use in marina's when cruising with use of lighting. Or if on a swinging mooring, fit a 30W-40W solar panel.

Personally, for a heavy ish monohull, I would stick to an inboard unless there was a good opportunity for another idea. For a lighter monohull then yes, a brand new 2st outboard has its place.

Things they don't tell you in the manual: the bottom of the leg can get knicked (often just four bolts). You have to hump it off the back to service/winter it. You might need spray the nice new cover with scruffy paint to deter theft, or fit a massive rusty chain and lock that seizes every year with solt corrision. Is the transom strong enough. think about the holes and route and waterproofing for the cables and control wires. The fire risk with petrol needs care.
 

Blueboatman

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Been away, so sloow to respond.

Taking the 'lump' out should be reasonably straightforward ? Unbolt the propshaft, coupling and exhaust etc, take off as many bits as possible to reduce the weight ( eg alternator and starter, mebbe the gearbox too, slide it forward onto a wooden board and then its a 2 man lift to another board in the cockpit or a serious block and tackle around the boom (which itself will need to be supported vertically with a wooden T very close to the block and tackle).
Undo the lifelines and slide the motor sideways onto another board supported to two ladders tied to the side of the boat and lower to the ground..I sthat what you meant?

A thought. Is there an owners website where you can copy others' techniques for the detail of mounting the new outboard bracket etc ? Don't skimp on a good quality bracket and nice big backing plate (say 18mm bedded inside the transom with plenty of epoxy/epoxy filler 'goop'. The transom is unlikely to be perfectly flat inside..
Depending on how thorough you want to be, you can remove the 3throughhulls too, and grind and epoxy/glass neat and sound patches to fill in the holes..
You will be amazed at the sheer amount of heavy and rusty 'bits' that pile up on the ground once the tank, breather, controls, fuel pipes, rotten soundproofing, wiring, filters, etc etc are removed !
Good luck if you decide to go ahead...And then sell the old stuff on ebay to someone who needs spares for a rebuild.
 
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