what polish

tomframe

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just tackling my topsides, what is a good polish to use with a machine polisher, the guys in the dock have what they claim to be a polish and cutting paste combined? - what might this be, or rather what do you think is best?
 

[2574]

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If heavily oxidised, scratched or filthy then "3M restorer and wax". (Moderately abrasive with wax combined)

If lightly oxidised and fairly clean then "3M Cleaner and wax". (lightly abrasive with wax combined)
 

Richard10002

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I've just used T Cut as it's 2 years since she was done properly. Cleans well, then a coat of wax has made her shine - the bottle said it only needs one application per year - I'll reserve judgement on that.
 

MAURICE

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I have just used 3M perfect it 111 which is a very light cutting agent and polish. I must admit it has bought back the shine to the topsides and I am very pleased with it. I have also got 3M rosa final polish which is a final wax coat. I have yet to put that on. The 3M products are quite expensive The perfect it was £28 and the Rosa polish about £12 but I think the end result was worth it nd i have yet to put on the Rosa.

Maurice
 

[2574]

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Maurice

Do you mean "Finesse It" rather tham "Perfect it"? I've not heard of Perfect it under the 3M banner. After you use Finnese It make sure that you apply a wax - sounds like your "Rosa" will do that for you.

rob
 

[2574]

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I was once told that repeated use of T cut will turn gelcoat a dull brown colour (the colour of T cut) so i've always steered well clear. Could be an old wives tale though - dunno either way.

rob
 

Richard10002

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[ QUOTE ]
I was once told that repeated use of T cut will turn gelcoat a dull brown colour (the colour of T cut) so i've always steered well clear. Could be an old wives tale though - dunno either way.

rob

[/ QUOTE ]

Hi Rob,

You could be right....I dont know about changing the colour but, because it is slightly abrasive, I dont think it should be used regularly anyway. However, Rogue was badly neglected last year, due to my health situation, and all of the gelcoat was beginning to get that cloudy look.

A few of my neighbours in the yard were really impressed at how well she looked after the application, and even more so when the wax went on... so I dont think I've got a problem just yet.

So I too wouldnt recommend it for regular use, but it does the trick on a neglected surface.
 

Nico

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You are going to need a lot of abrasive to wear away the gelcoat, after which you will be through to the cloth/resin. So I expect the "turn brown" story is a myth.
 

MAURICE

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Sorry
Yes its finesse it 111 its a polish and compond all in one. The Rosa polish is a final wax but as I said the diffrence is amazing and I am well impressed

Maurice
 

[2574]

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Yes Finesse It is good stuff; I've used it a fair bit. I've stuck with the 3M range of products and have been well pleased albeit that it's not cheap. However having bought the boat it seem a little stupid to resent £20 for a tin of polish! My wife maintains that that the boat has more "beauty products" than she has herself - and I think she might be right!
 

VicS

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Just done mine this weekend. I used the same technique that I have used successfully in the past although different make materials.

I started my removing the worst of the oxidation with Star Bright heavy oxidation remover by hand followed that with the ordinary Star Bright oxidation remover used in conjunction with a foam compounding mop (The white one for two-pack paint systems from Screw Fix) All kept wet with water sprayed from a trigger spray bottle (ex domestic cleaning product)
Finished off with a Star Bright polish by hand.

Only reason I used Star bright products was that it was what the chandler stocked. Previously I used Farecla / Boat pride products.

Results not bad for a 30 year old boat and an over 65 year old owner.
(took some pictures, will post them sometime)

I notice now that there are products that are "self lubricating" which can be used by hand or with a lambs wool mop without the water. I opted to stick to my tried and tested method though! but had to wash the boat next to me when I'd finished!

Mop from Screw-fix £5.86

Rubbing compound £12.80

Heavy duty one I already had but presumably the same or similar price

Polish £14.50 but they did offer one containing Teflon at just over £20 IIRC

Just used a two speed electric drill on its slow speed. A proper polishing machine may have been better but they are heavy. Had to make an adaptor for the 14mm threaded mop to fit the drill chuck.
 

VicS

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The before and after pictures.

DSCF0451.jpg


DSCF0452.jpg


DSCF0458.jpg


DSCF0459.jpg


(And the one for sale? A Tucker designed "Princess" ? ... £400 .
Jezebel of Coldash a fin keeled Corribee also for sale)
 

johnpye

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A combination cut and polish may be our Clean Cut Compound. It is a cutting compound that breaks down to a finer polish to produce a shine as you work it.

We recommend using the minimum of abrasion do the job, so use cutting compound only where needed to remove scratches. If you are just restoring the shine and colour, use a less abrasive product like our Colour and Shine Restorer that is formulated for that job.

But don't confuse polish with wax. Cutting and polishing treatments work by fine abrasion of the surface, and do not provide a protective coating. Once you've done it, you need to get some wax (or a synthetic glaze) on the surface to protect it, or you will be back to dull withing a few weeks. It really does have to be a two-step process as VicS describes above.

The durability of the finish depends on the quality of wax you use. Generally speaking the best, hardest and most durable is Carnauba wax and a good formulation will not only protect, but can even fill minor dulling imperfections. The brilliant shine then comes from buffing the surface of the wax. Our Best Brazilian Boatwax (carnauba wax comes from Brazil /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif) is a bit dearer than our PTFE (Teflon) wax, but definitely out-performs it.

It may also be worth investing in a machine to do the job. You can get orbital polishers, which are really buffing machines, or rotary sander-polishers. Orbital machines are a bit lighter, and can have a big head without the danger of leaving burn or swirl marks - good for quick easy polishing. Rotary machines can be used for sanding, compounding and final polishing, but do need a bit more care in use. If you really need to economise, you can also get polishing kits for use with a power drill. Use these with care, and like any rotary system, use it at low speed on GRP to prevent burn marks.
 
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