What internal boat temps are ok at night ?

TopDonkey

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I'm sat on my boat inside with an air temperature on 12.1 degrees C, i dont have a problem with it, i just put a jumper on, but i do start to shiver uncontrollably after a few hours just slightly, and wondered if there might be any health concerns over it ?

At night time, air temp drops to about 8-9 degrees and my hollow fiber sleeping bag keeps me mostly warm enough, is this ok as well ?

I have Eberspacher warm air heating, but dont feel the need to turn it on, I ride my motorbikes summer and winter, and in the winter in the snow, my body temperature can get very low, but i warm up after a couple of hours, but on the boat, as the temperature drop is prolonged in the evenings, i was just wondering if it was wise to put the heating on ?, its not because i cant afford to run it, i can, but i just dont mind being cold, even to the point of uncontrollable shivering

What does anyone else think ?
 

semisimple

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i can, but i just dont mind being cold, even to the point of uncontrollable shivering
I suppose it depends on what works for you.

If it were me I wouldn't trust myself once I'd reached the uncontrollable shivering state.

Shivering such that you can't stop on your own mean means moderate to severe hypothermia which could mean confusion and being unable to think clearly (and most people won't actually realise that their judgement is impaired) - all of those are pretty bad on a boat.

So If it was so cold that I couldn't stop shivering I would make sure there was some heating running...
 

TopDonkey

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I suppose it depends on what works for you.

If it were me I wouldn't trust myself once I'd reached the uncontrollable shivering state.

Shivering such that you can't stop on your own mean means moderate to severe hypothermia which could mean confusion and being unable to think clearly (and most people won't actually realise that their judgement is impaired) - all of those are pretty bad on a boat.

So If it was so cold that I couldn't stop shivering I would make sure there was some heating running...

Out on my motorbike in the snow, i often get past the shivering stage, where you actually stop shivering, your fingers start to get very slow to respond and everything does start to slow down then, my thought processes although they do slow down, i am still capable of logical reasoning i believe, so i dont think this stage of coldness (is that a proper word!) is a problem ?
 

sarabande

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you get used to cold temps. We had a disaster on the house central heating late last November, and were unable to re-do the whole system as it would have meant major structural alterations. Spent most of the winter in one room and high-speed dashes for showers etc.

The lowest temp inside was about -4, with solid ice on the kitchen windows

PC030020.jpg


EDIT pic not appearing ??????



And throughout this winter, neither of us has had a cold or the sniffles. :) It's a healthy a winter as I can remember.


I spent one winter on the boat while working in London,and aimed to run an oil radiator on a thermostat, so that there was no condensation in the mornings - I guess about 8 to 10C. Not terribly comfortable as I was in heated offices all day, but the boat never felt damp. I did have a humidifier, which I would regard as essential for living on board in cold times. It just stops the cold AND damp feeling, and dry cold is supportable.
 
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noelex

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Out on my motorbike in the snow, i often get past the shivering stage, where you actually stop shivering, your fingers start to get very slow to respond and everything does start to slow down then, my thought processes although they do slow down, i am still capable of logical reasoning i believe, so i dont think this stage of coldness (is that a proper word!) is a problem ?
Your body is designed to work at a certain temperature.
Uncontrollable shivering is because your core temperature has dropped below this level
Your thought process are slowing down because your brain is not working properly.
 

TopDonkey

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The lowest temp inside was about -4, with solid ice on the kitchen windows

Wow!, now that is low !, i dont think i would be brave enough to try a temoerature than low continuously

Your pic is appearing, a very iced up blue tinted window frame, it does look very cold
 

TopDonkey

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Your body is designed to work at a certain temperature.
Uncontrollable shivering is because your core temperature has dropped below this level
Your thought process are slowing down because your brain is not working properly.

I think the normal core temp is between 36-37.9 degrees C, below 35.5 you start shivering, and below 35 there is an avalance effect where your body cant keep up and its the start of the slippery slope, I dont believe i get below 35, but just thought i'd seek others experiences on the matter as i have only been living aboard 3 weeks now

what Vern said is pretty much what i do at the moment, but theres only so many jumpers you can put on !
 

elton

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You're not used to it, that's all. When I was a nipper we had ice on the windows throughout the coldest winter months. We didn't shiver continuously. What did people do before central heating? They didn't shiver continuously, that's for certain. They just drank cocoa and wore an extra pullover. In fact I can't imagine how my gran could've knitted my winter pullovers with numb fingers and a continuous shiver.
 
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noelex

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I think the normal core temp is between 36-37.9 degrees C, below 35.5 you start shivering, and below 35 there is an avalance effect where your body cant keep up and its the start of the slippery slope, I dont believe i get below 35, but just thought i'd seek others experiences on the matter as i have only been living aboard 3 weeks now

what Vern said is pretty much what i do at the moment, but theres only so many jumpers you can put on !
By the slippery slope you mean you die if it continues yes you are right.
Before you die you will experience short term problems, then some permanent effects. The permanent effects can be cumulative and may only be apparent in the long term.
Its not healthy to take your body outside its normal core temperature.
 

semisimple

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Out on my motorbike in the snow, i often get past the shivering stage, where you actually stop shivering, your fingers start to get very slow to respond and everything does start to slow down then, my thought processes although they do slow down, i am still capable of logical reasoning i believe, so i dont think this stage of coldness (is that a proper word!) is a problem ?
Well that sounds a bit dangerous (riding if your fingers aren't responding properly!)

But as others say - everyone responds differently. It could be that in time you stop shivering uncontrollably and your body gets used to it.

Just remember though that your judgement probably will be impaired when you're that cold - so the trick is not to let it get to the stage where you're beyond helping yourself. If you're generally in good health and eating well then if you get dangerously cold you will put the heating on or do something to warm yourself up.
 

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Last year the temperature in the saloon was not dropping below 35C at night in July. As we were stuck in port after my operation we bought a mains powered fan, which improved things no end. Power consumption was very reasonable.
 

Zanziba

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I concur with others:

a) Your body core should not fall below 35.5C - Chemical reactions that keep your body chemcial levels in balance do not work properly outside this temperature threshold.

b) Although no long term damage is caused by dipping under this your brain function will be reduced and you will become unaware (or not care) about dropping further. People do die from hypothermia.

c) The indication that you are starting to get too cold is shivering. If you stop shivering but are colder then you are either fighting the shivering mentally or your body is running out of immediate sources of energy to maintain the shivering.

d) Your body will reduce blood flow to your extremities which will make your hands and feet numb and eventually stop you functioning properly.

There is no reason to be cold. Put on more clothes, sit in your sleeping bag or turn on the heating.
 

ccscott49

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I'm sat on my boat inside with an air temperature on 12.1 degrees C, i dont have a problem with it, i just put a jumper on, but i do start to shiver uncontrollably after a few hours just slightly, and wondered if there might be any health concerns over it ?

At night time, air temp drops to about 8-9 degrees and my hollow fiber sleeping bag keeps me mostly warm enough, is this ok as well ?

I have Eberspacher warm air heating, but dont feel the need to turn it on, I ride my motorbikes summer and winter, and in the winter in the snow, my body temperature can get very low, but i warm up after a couple of hours, but on the boat, as the temperature drop is prolonged in the evenings, i was just wondering if it was wise to put the heating on ?, its not because i cant afford to run it, i can, but i just dont mind being cold, even to the point of uncontrollable shivering

What does anyone else think ?

Why would you want to be cold and shivering? Put the heating on! as others have said it is not healthy.
 

duncan99210

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Max temp is frankly more of a problem than minimum. It's easy to put on more clothes, turn the heating up, put on anopther duvet. Preserving the body's core temperature is also accompanied by lots of warning signs eg shivering, numbness. The opposite is more of a problem as reducing temperature is difficult and over temperature lacks many warning signs to yourself. You have to make sure that you're drinking lots and there's plenty of ventilation; miss out on this and it's all too easy to get overheated and the next thing you know you're in hospital being treated for heatstroke.
 

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'normal' body temperature is 36.9C. Shivering is the body's way of trying to keep the core warm. Letting your temperature drop to 35 degrees is too low and is inviting heart attacks and strokes - the blood starts to thicken as body temperature drops and is therefore more likely to clot and block the tiny arteries in the heart and brain. As others have said, once your body temperature drops your brain function is impaired and you will probably not be aware of this.

Conversely, a person with 'normal' body function is not likely to overheat to the extent that they cause themselves damage as long as they are drinking adequately and are not ill.

Our brains are good at regulating our body temperatures when we are well as long as we do not ignore the warning signs i.e. shivering - keep warm!
 

semisimple

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I've never heard of anyone freezing to death at 8 degrees (C). Shivering is a natural mechanism to keep the body warm, not a prelude to impending death.

It isn't about the actual air temperature. It's about how your body responds to cold and how effective it is at regulating temperature.

So what matters is how your body is coping. Uncontrollable shivering (whether the air temperature is 15, 8 or -10) is an indicator of moderate to severe hypothermia.

b) Although no long term damage is caused by dipping under this your brain function will be reduced and you will become unaware (or not care) about dropping further. People do die from hypothermia.
And that's the scary thing. On one weekend we had a girl who became so cold (and I've got to take the blame for not noticing it earlier) that she had to be forced to go down below and warm up. She just wouldn't do anything about it and adamantly refused to follow suggestions. That was her judgement getting impaired.
 

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Why do this to yourself? My last boat had an Eberspacher and I used it a lot in the Winter, very nice to have but they do coke up (well mine did) if used on low power for extended periods of time. Also had a cheap fan heater as back up. Now have a different boat and use an oil filled radiator. Also use an electric blanket in Winter, brilliant and helps keep everything dry as well. I have two duvets, one on top, one under.

It's one thing shivering away on your boat but another entirely being the way you describe and also in control (or not) of a motorbike. That just sounds like an accident waiting to happen. Please do yourself a favour and listen to the good advice that's been offered...
 
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