'Used to be deeper than this'

zoidberg

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A 32' yacht of some sort 'took the ground' recently at the bottom of Beaulieu River.
Instead of simply awaiting the inevitable rise of tide, they called the stalwarts at the MCA for help ( or was it HM Coastguard, as another rag reported? ) and the Cowes RNLI Atlantic 85 ILB was tasked to go fetch 'em.

Apparently those on board, decked out in all the right-on yottie gear, were surprised to learn that the water would all come back of its own accord....

"Following discussion with the yacht skipper our helm decided to stand off as the tide had turned and await sufficient depth for the vessel to float off...." UKNIP.CO.UK

https://www.islandecho.co.uk/cowes-lifeboat-aids-32ft-yacht-near-beaulieu-river/

I'm wondering if the 'discussion' included the oft-heard Solent refrain "Some mothers do have 'em."
 

dom

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Apparently those on board, decked out in all the right-on yottie gear, were surprised to learn that the water would all come back of its own accord....

Jeepers, so you're saying that the water from a river flows out into the sea, then turns around and comes back in?

Always wondered how those salmon got up those rapids!
 

GHA

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A 32' yacht of some sort 'took the ground' recently at the bottom of Beaulieu River.
Instead of simply awaiting the inevitable rise of tide, they called the stalwarts at the MCA for help ( or was it HM Coastguard, as another rag reported? ) and the Cowes RNLI Atlantic 85 ILB was tasked to go fetch 'em.

Apparently those on board, decked out in all the right-on yottie gear, were surprised to learn that the water would all come back of its own accord....



https://www.islandecho.co.uk/cowes-lifeboat-aids-32ft-yacht-near-beaulieu-river/

I'm wondering if the 'discussion' included the oft-heard Solent refrain "Some mothers do have 'em."

Did you miss a link or something? No mention anywhere of "Apparently those on board, decked out in all the right-on yottie gear, were surprised to learn that the water would all come back of its own accord...."

How do you know what they were wearing or that the skipper didn't just let the CG know they were aground without requesting assistance, don't they often send out a boat even if no help was requested?

Can we take it by the smug condescending post you have never ever ran aground then? ;)
 

maby

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...

Can we take it by the smug condescending post you have never ever ran aground then? ;)

You know what they say? "There are two kinds of sailor - those that have run aground and those that have not yet..."
 

Stemar

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You know what they say? "There are two kinds of sailor - those that have run aground and those that have not yet..."
... And of those who ran aground, there are those who dealt with it on their own and those who panicked and called for help. There is also a relatively small number who assessed the situation and decided they genuinely needed help before calling for it.
 

GHA

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... And of those who ran aground, there are those who dealt with it on their own and those who panicked and called for help. There is also a relatively small number who assessed the situation and decided they genuinely needed help before calling for it.


Do we know if these guys did actually call for help? Or just called to let the CG know what was going on and they sent a boat anyway?
 

sailor211

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It is a dilemma, say nothing and a helpful person will call in a yacht in difficulty. Tel the coastguard that you are on the putty and enjoying tea cake and the view, and they may say ok or they may task a unit to assist you. I have heard on VHF a tasked unit demanding to assist and get a yacht off as they thought sitting on the mud for a hour or two was not seaman like.
 

mjcoon

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It is a dilemma, say nothing and a helpful person will call in a yacht in difficulty. Tel the coastguard that you are on the putty and enjoying tea cake and the view, and they may say ok or they may task a unit to assist you. I have heard on VHF a tasked unit demanding to assist and get a yacht off as they thought sitting on the mud for a hour or two was not seaman like.

I suppose you/they cannot be in anyone's way since no-one else was expecting to take that route...

Mike.
 

prv

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Is it possible that someone called it in from the shore or another boat?

It’s certainly possible, but I’d have thought the Coastguard would then try to call the yacht aground before tasking anyone.

To put myself in the appropriate category, I have run aground in the Beaulieu :D. First time I went in there after dark, many years ago, I went the wrong side of an unlit pile and ran up a gravelly bank at about five knots. The benefits of a traditional long keel - the boat just slid up it without coming to any harm ;). No way I was coming back off without a significant rise of tide though, so I went below and cooked and ate dinner while I waited. Never occurred to me to let anyone else know or to call for help (which wouldn’t have been able to help anyway unless it came with a five-ton crane :p )

Pete
 

LONG_KEELER

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It’s certainly possible, but I’d have thought the Coastguard would then try to call the yacht aground before tasking anyone.

To put myself in the appropriate category, I have run aground in the Beaulieu :D. First time I went in there after dark, many years ago, I went the wrong side of an unlit pile and ran up a gravelly bank at about five knots. The benefits of a traditional long keel - the boat just slid up it without coming to any harm ;). No way I was coming back off without a significant rise of tide though, so I went below and cooked and ate dinner while I waited. Never occurred to me to let anyone else know or to call for help (which wouldn’t have been able to help anyway unless it came with a five-ton crane :p )

Pete

I allays run the black ball up within seconds of running aground along with a cast fishing rod with no bait. Then make sure people can see you splicing a bit of rope. If you start leaning over, quickly deploy the dinghy and start chipping away with a hoe or such like. I've technically never run aground yet :)
 
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This went fast on the Pole Sand, off Exmouth, on a falling tide. I was called up from the E/R and immediately sent over the side with a scrubbing broom.
Which didn't fool the MCA unfortunately ;)
 
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