Un-plaiting in-mast halyards

Yngmar

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Pull the crossed one out, tighten up all the other ones bar taut, then drop in ballasted mousing line (stack of nuts, etc.) from the top and fish it out on the mast exit (bent wire coathook or similar). You may want to practice the dropping and fishing first to make sure you can get it, lest you risk making matters worse. Good luck :)
 

greeny

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Sounds like you think more than one is crossed and you don't know which. You could try trial and error and hope that you can guess right and not make it worse or pull all of them out except for 1 and then use Yngmar's method to re-install them. Can't think of any shortcuts to solve this one.
 

Porthandbuoy

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I couldn't think of any shortcuts either. The mast is off the boat on trestles at the moment. I reckon I'll have to drill out the pop-rivets, take the bottom end off and have a gander.
 

Concerto

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I couldn't think of any shortcuts either. The mast is off the boat on trestles at the moment. I reckon I'll have to drill out the pop-rivets, take the bottom end off and have a gander.

Remove all but one halyard. Do not worry about any mousing lines. If you use a steel nut on a mouse line from the top of the mast, then with a ceramic magnet (available cheaply from eBay) on the top of the mast section will keep the line to the top of the inside of your mast as you draw the mousing line down the mast. Hook it out at the correct exit at the base by having a loop of flexible wire to catch the bolt. Then repeat for the rest of the halyards.
 

Quandary

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Many years ago I had a similar problem, we put up with it for a couple of seasons then one winter when the mast was down we opened both ends. Our problem was that we could not determine which halyards were crossed, it seemed to vary. We made a pointy wooden sled about 2'' long (or trolley, I think we may have had wheels on it) to run through and put mousing cords on pins arranged by their position relative to the sheaves and colour coded. We had the mast flat on its back and drew the sled through from head to foot being careful that it did not tumble. In our case it was further complicated being a fractional rig. It was about 30 years ago but I still remember it, it was a miserable wet day and there were three of us.
Sounds like overkill and it took most of the day to do but when it was finished we knew for certain that everything was where it should be, I am sure someone will come up with a better idea. It made a fantastic difference to our spinnaker hoists and drops.
 

Major_Clanger

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Remove all but one halyard. Do not worry about any mousing lines. If you use a steel nut on a mouse line from the top of the mast, then with a ceramic magnet (available cheaply from eBay) on the top of the mast section will keep the line to the top of the inside of your mast as you draw the mousing line down the mast. Hook it out at the correct exit at the base by having a loop of flexible wire to catch the bolt. Then repeat for the rest of the halyards.

That's a great idea. :encouragement:
 

Spyro

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I couldn't think of any shortcuts either. The mast is off the boat on trestles at the moment. I reckon I'll have to drill out the pop-rivets, take the bottom end off and have a gander.
Does the top have a cap that comes of or is it welded? Zspars have a cap held on with 2 j bolts. I recently had the same problem. I left all but one halyard in and used a stiff wire to re run the original ones without twists. My mast was down
 

Daydream believer

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Remove all but one halyard. Do not worry about any mousing lines. If you use a steel nut on a mouse line from the top of the mast, then with a ceramic magnet (available cheaply from eBay) on the top of the mast section will keep the line to the top of the inside of your mast as you draw the mousing line down the mast. Hook it out at the correct exit at the base by having a loop of flexible wire to catch the bolt. Then repeat for the rest of the halyards.

How does the magnet have enough strength to reach past wire conduits or deep enough to reach past the luff groove (if you run down that face to miss spreader roots) & how do you stop the nut coming disengaged from the magnet at the spreader roots?
& how much coffee did you drink whilst sitting in your armchair dreaming this up?:sleeping:
 

Porthandbuoy

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How does the magnet have enough strength to reach past wire conduits or deep enough to reach past the luff groove (if you run down that face to miss spreader roots) & how do you stop the nut coming disengaged from the magnet at the spreader roots?
& how much coffee did you drink whilst sitting in your armchair dreaming this up?:sleeping:

Worth a try though. It's a Selden mast and I have a SeaSure magnet that can lift anchors. You got a better idea?
 

William_H

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I understand the problem and think I have fixed mine by simply shoving some old rigging wire as a mouse down to re run the halyard. However my fractional rig has exit sheave boxes at jib halyard and spin halyard exits and also topping lift exit.
The topping lift exit box when removed gives some access to halyards like a half way point. You might if it were like mine be able to pull halyards out through the hole while leaving top and bottom still emerging from the mast. All a bit tricky. However do not be tempted to buy one of those USB TV cameras to try to look into mast. I got one it worked OK but I could not make any sense of what I could see. No use at all. ol'will
 

greeny

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Like I said earlier, take all of them out bar one and then re thread them. I used an electricians "fish" for this which is available from the usual diy stores or e-bay. They're not metal any more but are made of stiff nylon rod or some other plastic like material and come in different lengths. I tried the magnet trick but it didn't work for me as there were too many fixed bits in the mast and the magnet kept losing the nut part way down. As you run the new ones in, pull them tight before running the next one. That's how I did mine on trestles when I replaced the mast. Bit off a faff but if you check each one as you run it in before running the next one you should be ok.
I did run mine in before I put the top sheave box on the mast and that made it much easier I think.
 

tjbrace

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My mast has spreader bars which span the mast void connecting opposite spreaders (2 sets). A few years ago I had a professional rigger re-reeve my halyards etc. He withdrew all bar one and used the remaining halyard to fit mouse lines for the other 6 lines. When I used the mouse lines to refit the rigging 5 of the 7 were the wrong side of the bars and would barely move. I had to remove the 2 spinnaker halyards and the pole uphaul to be able to operate rhe main halyard and topping lift. I suspect that the genoa halyard is still behind the bars.
 

Porthandbuoy

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My mast has spreader bars which span the mast void connecting opposite spreaders (2 sets). A few years ago I had a professional rigger re-reeve my halyards etc. He withdrew all bar one and used the remaining halyard to fit mouse lines for the other 6 lines. When I used the mouse lines to refit the rigging 5 of the 7 were the wrong side of the bars and would barely move. I had to remove the 2 spinnaker halyards and the pole uphaul to be able to operate rhe main halyard and topping lift. I suspect that the genoa halyard is still behind the bars.

I see a solution here. My single pair of spreaders are fitted to sockets pop-rivetted to the mast. I don't know if there is a spreader bar between them. If not, I could withdraw all but one halyard, as suggested, but by using different coloured mousing lines I should be able to pull all the lines back through at the same time avoiding twists and/or crossovers.

Cables should not get in the way as they run in dedicated channels in the mast extrusion.
 

Martin_J

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If it's a fairly straight mast when supported on trestles, then with either the head or the foot off I found it not too difficult to have one halyard pulled taut at a time and see which, if any others were pulled out their resting place. A good torch helped.

What makes you think they're twisted? I thought mine were twisted but with the mast up couldn't quite work out how..

Occasionally the main would be hard to hoist, sometimes would jam... Solution was to replace the plate between the sheaves at the head and also to replace the Selden sheaves at the same place. The inner holes in the sheaves had been enlarged/worn enough to make hoisting harder than it should have been.
 
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