Solid Fuel Heater Flue Length

Jonny A

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Hi All,

I'd really like to fit one of the small Dickinson Newport solid fuel heaters to my Contessa 26. However I can't see how I could install one as they specify a minimum 4 feet of flue is required, and unless I want a huge chimney above deck level I simply don't have the depth. Has anyone out there managed to make such an installation work?

Thanks in advance.
 

pvb

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Any natural draught heater is going to need a minimum flue length if it is to work. You might look at alternatives - the Taylors paraffin heater uses a much narrower flue pipe and only needs 1100mm minimum flue height.
 
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If you fit it as low as possible that's a good start.
If you don't want to run the heater when you are actually sailing, then you can have some of that 4' above decks, it can just plug on to the deck fitting, they are designed to be easily removable, and then you can put a cap on the deck fitting when not using the heater.
I have a Newport, although the diesel version, on a yacht and found it easy to do that.

May I politely ask why you want a solid fuel one, not a drip feed diesel?
 
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The Taylors diesel version has a longer minimum flue height (1300mm) which is more than the Dickinson Newport the OP was considering.

Aha! thank you.
Thinking about it, a Taylors pressurised paraffin burner doesn't actually need a flue to run, ( I cook on them every day..)
The heater must a similar burner, with a flue to get rid of the combustion gases and water vapour as it's meant to be left on 24 hrs.
 

Poignard

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I used to have a charcoal heater mounted on the main bulkead. The flue cannot have been more than about 700mm length, measured from the top of the heater. I never had any problems with fumes. But having the heater mounted there was unsatisfactory because the air below the heater was cold.

I replaced it with an old Taylors model 065 pressurised paraffin heater which I mounted as low down as possible in a hanging locker. This enabled me to have a good flue length and I have a removable cowl which adds another 100mm to the total length.
 
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To the OP, if you ring Kuranda, they are very helpful, I think the guy to speak to is Darren, maybe he will say you can get away with under 4' anyway, especially if you lag the flue to keep it nice and hot. The H type flues draw much better than cowl types (but unfortunately their main ambition in life is to snag the rigging..)
 
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Jonny A

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Thanks for the replies. It doesn't necessarily have to be a solid fuel model, but I think I prefer that from the point of reducing potential plumbing and spillage possibilities. Is there much difference in performance?
 
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Thanks for the replies. It doesn't necessarily have to be a solid fuel model, but I think I prefer that from the point of reducing potential plumbing and spillage possibilities. Is there much difference in performance?

Diesel ones more controlable and probably hotter, it's only one small pipe, and the fuel is much easier to keep in a tank than messing with kindling, chopping wood, sacks of coal etc
 

Plum

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Thanks for the replies. It doesn't necessarily have to be a solid fuel model, but I think I prefer that from the point of reducing potential plumbing and spillage possibilities. Is there much difference in performance?

I have the Taylors diesel heater and as said above specifies a 1.3m flue. I tried a shorter one and although it worked, it was sometimes difficult to light and a few times after a period of runing, went out completely in gusty wind. It is now more than 1.3m and works reliably. I have two flue sections about 0.4m each that plug into the deck fitting (deck fitting male flue female) when required. I nearly fitted a solid fuel stove but glad I went for the diesel one as no mess or additional fuel to store and does not need tending so I can leave it on all night without worry knowing it will still be running when i wake up. Fuel pipe plumbed into a spare tapping into my engine primary filter and a cheep 12v pump.

Www.solocoastalsailing.co.uk
 
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fergycool

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Diesel ones more controlable and probably hotter, it's only one small pipe, and the fuel is much easier to keep in a tank than messing with kindling, chopping wood, sacks of coal etc
As somebody with a solid fuel stove (Davey Hot Pot) I would say it takes less skill to keep an overnight fire with a diesel stove! It's not difficult to keep a fire in overnight with coal, but you've got much more of a guarantee to wake up with toasty toes with a diesel stove.
 

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I have a Hampshire Heaters stove on my 26-footer. I have just over the minimum specified 30cm of flue in the cabin, and to use it I screw another 30cm piece into the deck fitting. I have no problems at all with draught, blowback, whatever.

There is a bit of smoke when it's starting - ho much depends on the charcoal - but one it is running it is completely smoke-free, completely smell-free and almost completely silent. Just the occasional quiet "ping" of burning charcoal. No pumping, no diesel fumes, no fan. What's not to like? Sure, the air below it can be a bit colder, but if anyone is moving around it all mixes, or I can flap a towel a bit.

There are times when I would really like the convenience of an Eberspächer/Planar/Webasto type, but overall I am very happy with what I have.
 

Kukri

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The I have been very happy with solid fuel stoves. Always fit it right down on the cabin sole or you will get a puddle of stagnant cold air at foot level! Agree H head is best. Ideally alongside the mast so it is in the “slot” when sailing. It should be demountable above deck, with a “water iron” deck fitting.For a Contessa 26 I would look hard at a Pascall Atkey “Pansy” charcoal stove, it’s only slightly bigger than a Taylor’s and the flue is quite small. Have not come across Hampshire Heaters but I wonder if they are a modern version?
 
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BabaYaga

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unless I want a huge chimney above deck level I simply don't have the depth. Has anyone out there managed to make such an installation work?

If you need an extra foot of flue above deck, adding a protection hoop might be a good idea.
The installation in the photo below is perhaps not exactly pretty, but the point is it does not catch any sheets despite being placed on the side of the coachroof just forward of the mast.
(This is for a Refleks type diesel heater and as evident, both chimney and air intake).
chimney.jpg
 

JumbleDuck

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For a Contessa 26 I would look hard at a Pascall Atkey “Pansy” charcoal stove, it’s only slightly bigger than a Taylor’s and the flue is quite small. Have not come across Hampshire Heaters but I wonder if they are a modern version?

I think the Pansy is now out of production, but happy to be corrected. This is a Hampshire Heater:

home_1.jpg
 

Poignard

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I remember reading about a new charcoal heater on the market a few years ago where the body consisted of a length of steel rectangular hollow section. I think they were made somewhere in southern England. I can't remember any more bit they seemed simple, sturdy and compact. I don't think they were expensive.
 
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Well I don't want to criticise anybody else's experience, but I lived aboard a 24' yacht for a couple of years using a Pascall Atkey charcoal heater, and it was a nuisance.. you're meant to use lump charcoal, made by some ancient medieval process deep in a forest, which is expensive.
Barbie charcoal from the garage didn't work really. Coal sooted up the teeny flue after an hour or two. Hardwood likewise.
And the stove got very hot, but being circular, smooth and shiny it didn't warm up the air very well. But it was very good at burning fingers. Horrible things:disgust:

Now if you could convert it to drip feed diesel, and weld lots of fins all over the body to dissipate the heat, it would be ok.
 
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