Shower pump / water requirements

TopBanana

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What spec freshwater pump would I need in order to provide a decent shower at anchor for three / four people? How big a hot water tank? It'd be my only shower on board, so I'm starting from scratch.

Thanks!
 

Fr J Hackett

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The first thing you have to do unless you have a large boat, which it doesn't seem that you have, is to explain to people that showering on a small boat is very different to showering shoreside. They can't just stand under the shower and let it run whilst they do whatever they want. The accepted wisdom is to get wet, turn off the shower, soap up hair and all then lather and rinse. That keeps water usage to a minimum and ensures that at least the second person gets a warm shower, if in your compliment you have two or more females:eek: then the third person can usually expect to be using baby wipes or having a cold shower.:D
As for what size calorifier fit the biggest you can into whatever space you have allocated, pumps are usually par freshwater ones and are usually rated in L per min so when you look at the link below you will see even a 55L calorifier using a typical 16L per min pump which is typical, there are larger ones, you don't have a lot to spare. The plumbing is usually domestic push fit Hepworth or similar.

https://www.asap-supplies.com/domestic-water-supply/calorifiers-water-heaters-fittings/calorifiers
 
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SteveGorst

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we only have the most basic of fresh water pumps which gave a pathetic shower and used shed loads of water until we fitted an eco head. We fitted a Mira but others are available. The eco head made the shower much better, as well as saving water, and now my wife doesn't bother with going ashore a lot of the time. Our pump delivers 13 Litres per minute. We have also set the calorifiers mixer thermostat to deliver shower temperature water so we just turn on the hot tap and get under it.
 

RupertW

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we only have the most basic of fresh water pumps which gave a pathetic shower and used shed loads of water until we fitted an eco head. We fitted a Mira but others are available. The eco head made the shower much better, as well as saving water, and now my wife doesn't bother with going ashore a lot of the time. Our pump delivers 13 Litres per minute. We have also set the calorifiers mixer thermostat to deliver shower temperature water so we just turn on the hot tap and get under it.

Interesting re the Mira head - my only issue would be that ours are combined taps/shower head and I'd be irritated by using a shower head as a tap.

We go the other way with the hot water tank and keep it at hottest setting so the same sized tank can provide more showers as it gets mixed with cold water. We very rarely use shore facilities as the showers - used in the boaty way - seem fine and so much more convenient than walking down a pontoon with clothes, towel and wash stuff.
 

pvb

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We go the other way with the hot water tank and keep it at hottest setting so the same sized tank can provide more showers as it gets mixed with cold water.

I think you misunderstood SteveGorst's comment. Modern calorifiers are all fitted with a thermostatic mixing valve, so you can select the temperature of the water coming out. It doesn't affect the temperature of the water in the calorifier. However, it does mean you don't need to waste water whilst adjusting the shower temperature - just turn it to hot and turn it on.
 

SteveGorst

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We go the other way with the hot water tank and keep it at hottest setting so the same sized tank can provide more showers as it gets mixed with cold water. We very rarely use shore facilities as the showers - used in the boaty way - seem fine and so much more convenient than walking down a pontoon with clothes, towel and wash stuff.
I'm pretty sure that the way our tank works is that the water gets as hot as the engine water no matter what you set the thermostat to. However when you draw water off it the thermostat drives a valve that mixes cold water with the hot water as per the manufacturers (Hotpot) description below

"Water stored in the boat's calorifier reaches the same temperature as the engine, generally about 85°C. When hot water is needed, the calorifier uses a thermostatic mixing valve to combine this water with cold water to give the required water temperature."

I looked this up because you had me doubting myself ;)

This means we don't use much of the hot water in the cylinder as we have our showers. That's my take on it anyway.
 

pvb

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What spec freshwater pump would I need in order to provide a decent shower at anchor for three / four people? How big a hot water tank? It'd be my only shower on board, so I'm starting from scratch.

You'd need a fairly big tank, even if you can persuade your crew to minimise on water! One problem is that the water in the calorifier will slowly cool down when you're at anchor, so after say a night at anchor you'll be using more hot water per shower.

I'd suggest you look at 55-60 litre calorifiers, although where you'd put one in your Konsort could pose problems. Maybe the cockpit locker, but it would take up a lot of space.
 

pvb

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I'm pretty sure that the way our tank works is that the water gets as hot as the engine water no matter what you set the thermostat to. However when you draw water off it the thermostat drives a valve that mixes cold water with the hot water as per the manufacturers (Hotpot) description below

"Water stored in the boat's calorifier reaches the same temperature as the engine, generally about 85°C. When hot water is needed, the calorifier uses a thermostatic mixing valve to combine this water with cold water to give the required water temperature."

I looked this up because you had me doubting myself ;)

This means we don't use much of the hot water in the cylinder as we have our showers. That's my take on it anyway.

That's correct.
 

PaulRainbow

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Boil the kettle and tip the water in the heads sink, with a little cold water. Get a bar of nice soap and a flannel, have an all over wash. Dry with a towel and get dressed, job done.

A "decent" shower for 3 or 4 people on a Konsort would require a shoreside shower block.
 

duncan99210

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We can do 4 showers off a 20l calorifier using the water saving methods above. Our pump is rated at 15 litres per minute and we don’t have a thermostatic valve on the calorifier, just use the tap to set temperature. We also use a regime of men first, as they generally have less hair to deal with, leaving more warm water for the long haired crew.
Obviously, the bigger the calorifier the longer the showers but the down side is water useage. Our cruising is always limited by the rate at which we consume fresh water, so longer showers means more visits to “civilisation” to top up water tanks.
 

RupertW

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I'm pretty sure that the way our tank works is that the water gets as hot as the engine water no matter what you set the thermostat to. However when you draw water off it the thermostat drives a valve that mixes cold water with the hot water as per the manufacturers (Hotpot) description below

"Water stored in the boat's calorifier reaches the same temperature as the engine, generally about 85°C. When hot water is needed, the calorifier uses a thermostatic mixing valve to combine this water with cold water to give the required water temperature."

I looked this up because you had me doubting myself ;)

This means we don't use much of the hot water in the cylinder as we have our showers. That's my take on it anyway.

Ah ok - ours is only mixed at the taps not as it comes out of the hot water tank so the same effect except I guess we get fractionally more heat loss in the pipes. But I will check as the setting knob that I thought set the temperature of water going into the tank may actually be the temperature coming out of it as you describe.
 

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I agree that 4 showers on a small boat is optimistic, but it could be OK if people aren't in too much hurry & allow some time for reheating. What is important is making sure that it is possible to shower in short bursts. We have a tap/shower attachment with an inbuilt on/off switch, though a conventional mixer-tap can also be made to work.

The only really effective way to save water is to share a shower.
 

smb

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Where possible, if guests want showers I get them to do it whilst motoring. That way the calorifier stays hot.
Getting them to top up the tanks by Jerrycan from a distant tap drives home the point of using water sparingly.

Steve
 

simonfraser

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I agree that 4 showers on a small boat is optimistic, but it could be OK if people aren't in too much hurry & allow some time for reheating. What is important is making sure that it is possible to shower in short bursts. We have a tap/shower attachment with an inbuilt on/off switch, though a conventional mixer-tap can also be made to work.

The only really effective way to save water is to share a shower.

we find sharing a shower takes longer but the wasted water is worth it :)
 

Daydream believer

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we only have the most basic of fresh water pumps which gave a pathetic shower and used shed loads of water until we fitted an eco head. We fitted a Mira but others are available. The eco head made the shower much better, as well as saving water, and now my wife doesn't bother with going ashore a lot of the time. .

Surely she does not smell that bad :ambivalence::ambivalence:
 

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We used a pressurized garden liquid sprayer.....mix hot water with cold as desired pump and shower

I've got a hozlelock portashower so same idea. 5 litres of warm water allows for 2 showers. I think that the OP will have a shock as to the water used in showers even if he tells his guests about water tanks and storage.
 

LadyInBed

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Boil the kettle and tip the water in the heads sink, with a little cold water. Get a bar of nice soap and a flannel, have an all over wash. Dry with a towel and get dressed, job done.
:encouragement:
But I use a sponge rather than a flannel.
The built in sink shower tap never gets used.
A further consideration if you spray water around the heads is waste water removal, if gravity will do the job, no problem, but if not you will need a pump out system, either another electric pump or a manual one.
 
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