Should I buy dream yacht in Greece?

noswellplease

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Hoping to buy 38 to 42 footer in Greece soon.(Co-own with a friend) We are both just retired get on well together and think we could make it work by keeping things flexible between us. For example I might sale with him sometimes but also with my own family and friends on occasion. It's a big decision to make and wonder with all the refugee turmoil in Greece is the idea somewhat daft? Also wonder what is the cheapest way to maintain yacht (my pension is small) out there? Do you just get started meet people and find the best value for your euro.

We chartered a yacht last May and found the experience and weather so nice it really took our fancy.With all the different islands in the Aegean and Ionian Sea it must be wonderful to have time to explore the different locations at your ease.

Any thoughts from the converted and experienced would be much appreciated. Would it be best to make a sale now or wait till March and the new season?

Thanks in advance for your helpful views!
 

sailaboutvic

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Greece is a good has place as any where else to look for a boat , but you need to ask a lot of question before spending money to flyi out to view boats ,ask for lots of photos , we where thinking of sell our then 5 year old boat last winter , so we started looking around , I have to say we was very disappointed , we must had looked at 20 boats and walked pass another 50 up for sale and not one was has it was discripted , I am not talking about an old boat , boat over 120k I been around boats for 38 years so I think I know a little bit about them by now , we came across with boats with lumps out of the keel , engine coved in oil and rudders with great Chunk taken out of them . You could add up the pound just by walking past them .
All that said , that's not to say there not some very good boats about , you just need to ask the right question , if a boat is cheap you can bet your bottom doller she going to need money spend on it .
One thing we learned was , there no point selling a really nice boat to buy some thing that we going to spend time and money on .
This does not just apply to greece
Good luck , it's an exciting time for you both
 
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vyv_cox

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Refugees/migrants are absolutely not an issue so far as yachting is concerned. Most islands in the Dodecanese are receiving at least 100 per day but, having visited many of them this season, they don't affect us. In general they are just hanging around the streets trying to keep themselves occupied until the authorities move them on. On Lakki quay, for example, migrants were up and down throughout the day and night but I have yet to hear of any trouble from them. In some places, Lesvos for instance, they need to walk from one side of the island to the other but, other than feeling pity for their plight, they have no influence upon us.
 

V1701

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If Greece is where you want to do your sailing then yes it makes sense to also buy there, unless you fancy the trip across Biscay or through the canals. There are plenty of British flagged boats out there so it need not be any more complicated than buying a boat over here and it's also worth looking at ex charter boats. Just take your time, go and see lots of boats, probably best place to start would be the Ionian, Corfu & Preveza/lefkada, that's where there's more for sale than anywhere else. Also could look at boats for sale in Croatia. There are some what appear to be very good value boats for sale but you will need to sort the wheat from the chaff though same applies wherever you're looking to buy. Only you know if there'd be any need to formalise the shared ownership side of it and others would be better placed than I to comment on that. Best of luck and enjoy your retirement...
 

macd

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As said, the refugee tragedy is pretty much a none-issue for leisure sailors (although adopting sensible practice, widely publicised, is...er...sensible).
Re maintenance: if you can't do much of it yourself it rather sounds as if it could stretch your modest budget. Even if you happen to be lucky enough to find the right worker in the place where you happen to need them, it will cost.
 

rigman

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Refugees/migrants are absolutely not an issue so far as yachting is concerned. Most islands in the Dodecanese are receiving at least 100 per day but, having visited many of them this season, they don't affect us. In general they are just hanging around the streets trying to keep themselves occupied until the authorities move them on. On Lakki quay, for example, migrants were up and down throughout the day and night but I have yet to hear of any trouble from them. In some places, Lesvos for instance, they need to walk from one side of the island to the other but, other than feeling pity for their plight, they have no influence upon us.


May become an issue soon. I was speaking with the skipper of a German boat a few days ago who says that there are quite a few yachts doing quote "good business" in the East Med transporting illegals. He reckoned it is wide open and easy to ship them across from Turkey to Kos and other islands as there are few checks on yachts. I suspect he knew more than he told me.
 

dslittle

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Bought our first boat out there and never looked back. If you are looking in the Ionian I can totally recommend a trustworthy broker in the area if you want to PM me. (No relationship etc other than professional - well that is not totally true as we have been out for drinks with them as they are so nice...)
 

Tranona

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Hoping to buy 38 to 42 footer in Greece soon.(Co-own with a friend) We are both just retired get on well together and think we could make it work by keeping things flexible between us. For example I might sale with him sometimes but also with my own family and friends on occasion. It's a big decision to make and wonder with all the refugee turmoil in Greece is the idea somewhat daft? Also wonder what is the cheapest way to maintain yacht (my pension is small) out there? Do you just get started meet people and find the best value for your euro.

We chartered a yacht last May and found the experience and weather so nice it really took our fancy.With all the different islands in the Aegean and Ionian Sea it must be wonderful to have time to explore the different locations at your ease.

Any thoughts from the converted and experienced would be much appreciated. Would it be best to make a sale now or wait till March and the new season?

Thanks in advance for your helpful views!

Perfectly feasible idea. How you go about it depends on your budget, pattern of usage and expectations, particularly in respect of how much involvement you want in maintaining the boat as opposed to using it.

First of all would suggest the Ionian ,either Corfu or Levkas/Preveza as a good base. Good choice of cruising grounds without undertaking lengthy passages, easy access from UK, good infrastructure - boat yards, parts supply, services, to support running a boat by a non resident owner.

There are many ways of buying and managing a boat, in part depending on the budget. Boats are better if they are used, so if you only intend holiday type use, consider buying a boat through a charter management deal where you can get at least 6 weeks "free" use of the boat, mostly early and late season. This is by far the cheapest and least hassle way of owning a boat and you can maximise your holiday time as the boat is there when you want it and you just leave it when you finish. Downside is that the contracts are usually 5 years and then you take the boat, which may or may not suit your long term plans.

The next most easy way is to have somebody manage your boat for you so you don't have to spend any time on maintenance. the service can just be basic guardinage - that is somebody looking after your boat when you are not there and perhaps arranging for work that you don't want to do yourself but not an open ended management contract. If you enjoy doing work then there are several yards that can store your boat when you are not using it and launch it when you need it - sort of dry sail arrangement. You can also get a year round marina berth just as in the UK either rented or even buy a lease.

As to the boat to buy - be aware there are a lot of tired boats for sale by absentee owners who have either lost interest or can't afford to keep the boat. This often means they have been neglected and need lots of work to get them up to scratch. To reduce the chances of buying a tired boat, go for the newest you can which will almost inevitably mean a Bavaria, Beneteau or Jeanneau as not only are these much more popular but are also arguably the best types of boats for the job. This inevitably brings ex charter boats into the frame. There is a lot in favour of buying one of those despite the heavy use and high hours. This actually works in their favour as they will be well maintained and well equipped. Best time to buy is now when the choice of boats coming off the fleets is greatest and a late season (October) couple of weeks looking around at what is for sale can give you a good feel for what you can get. You might even consider having a weeks charter on a boat you might buy.

There are several operators who retire boats in the area, including the big operators such as Sunsail, Moorings and Kiriacoulis, but there are also smaller operators such as Sail Ionian who are worth considering. The last named has a couple of Bavarias coming up that would suit, and you can also get an annual management deal with them. if you are considering a new boat, suggest you talk to Chris Hawes of Yacht Fractions who is very experienced in setting up syndicate ownership deals and organising for new boats to be delivered and commissioned in Greece.

I bought my boat in a management deal with Kiriacoulis and when it retired kept it in Corfu, first in Gouvia and then dry sailed stored in Corfu Boatyard and managed by a local company which arranged the launch and brought it to the marina every time we wanted to use it. They also did some work and looked after it over the winter. Worked very well, but as suggested earlier is not the only way of doing it.

Feel free to pm if you want any more information.
 

Debs15

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Definitely go for it!
As mentioned, the Ionian is a great place to start. It is very boat friendly with everything you need.
I know quite a few good people to use for work/maintenance etc, also someone who sells private boats.
Please pm me if you would like some info.

Good luck!
 

Contest1

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Definitely buy were you wish to sail.
I,v long wanted to sail the Balaerics and bought a Contest 29 on the Costa Blanca in June. No more raceing the tide, heavy wet gear and cold damp days on the Irish sea.
Now they are only a good day sail away so I,m heading there as soon as the weather settles next season. Now sorting out the to do list and enjoying day sails getting used to the fin keel experience.
 

Melody

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May become an issue soon. I was speaking with the skipper of a German boat a few days ago who says that there are quite a few yachts doing quote "good business" in the East Med transporting illegals. He reckoned it is wide open and easy to ship them across from Turkey to Kos and other islands as there are few checks on yachts. I suspect he knew more than he told me.

Yachts have been used for years to transport people illegally and the Coastguard do check them but they are probably a bit busy rescuing those in less sea-worthy boats just now. If caught with anyone on board who is not on your crew list and/or who does not have valid papers to be in Greece your boat will be impounded, probably for years and you'll go to a Greek jail awaiting trial. Greek jails are not very nice places. If you think it's worth the risk for "good business" ...
 
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