Sheared bolt holes been retapped....metal filings???

Matata

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Anyone any smart ideas to prevent metal filings getting everywhere (and been left behind and causing rust foci). Several 6mm bolts have sheared and the only way to solve it is to redrill and tap new holes. I just don't want to leave metal filings everywhere....ideas?? Nik
 

graham

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Buy a cheap plumbers plunger remove the handle tape it in position to drill through the center. Gaffer tape old carpet in place to protect surrounding area and catch any swarf that escapes.
 

Stemar

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Whereabout are the bolts? Why not drill in to the bolt and use a stud extractor? Less swarf and no need to re-tap. Once you've vacuumed the worst away use a mag stick to collect the small stuff.

I see this advice regularly and cringe. Maybe it's my incompetence, which is near infinite, but I've broken far too many extractors in jammed bolts to let them anywhere near anything serious.

These may be OK, I've never needed one since I became aware of them,

s-l500.jpg

but I don't let these anywhere near my work

51010.jpg
 

Major_Clanger

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Buy a cheap plumbers plunger remove the handle tape it in position to drill through the center. Gaffer tape old carpet in place to protect surrounding area and catch any swarf that escapes.

That's genius! I'll pass on that tip to a pal of mine who's a gynaecologist.

I see this advice regularly and cringe. Maybe it's my incompetence, which is near infinite, but I've broken far too many extractors in jammed bolts to let them anywhere near anything serious.

These may be OK, I've never needed one since I became aware of them,

View attachment 76299

but I don't let these anywhere near my work


View attachment 76300

Extractors can work really well, but they have to be decent quality (most people try with eBay specials and then wonder why they have a hi-tensile extractor snapped off in the hole) and the drill has to be dead centre.
 

lw395

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I've never had any luck with stud extractors.
It seems to me that most types have a fundamental design flaw, they're tapered and driving them in tightens the stud in the hole.
I have had some success with left handed drills.

If you can drill dead centre into the stud, then removing metal will weaken the stud, allowing it t distort and relaxing its grip on the hole.
One awful job, we machined a guide to keep the drill central and just worked up in drill sizes.

I can imagine some jobs where it's easier to just put a couple of new fasteners in, either side of the old one.
 

pandos

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Magnets work well. Break up an old speaker. You'll be surprised at how good they can be.

Easyouts are frequently useless, for the reasons given. Either too weak or they expand the stuck bolt.

I have had some success with an old masonry bit in a good (impact) hammer action drill in reverse. Drill a pilot hole and then attack with the masonry bit. The heat helps...
 

forelle541

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Magnets work well. Break up an old speaker. You'll be surprised at how good they can be.

Easyouts are frequently useless, for the reasons given. Either too weak or they expand the stuck bolt.

I have had some success with an old masonry bit in a good (impact) hammer action drill in reverse. Drill a pilot hole and then attack with the masonry bit. The heat helps...

Use parallel stud extractors, they work a treat and do not expand the broken stud.
 

rszemeti

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I see this advice regularly and cringe. Maybe it's my incompetence, which is near infinite, but I've broken far too many extractors in jammed bolts to let them anywhere near anything serious.

These may be OK, I've never needed one since I became aware of them,

View attachment 76299

but I don't let these anywhere near my work

View attachment 76300

Neither of those is suitable for removing jammed bolts. Ever.

People seem to think they are magic, they are not, they are designed for a purpose and that purpose is 100% NOT removing jammed bolts and studs. They are designed to remove *broken* bolts and studs. Bolts and studs that are free moving, but have been snapped off by overtightening or sheered off somehow. If the bolt was seized, and the head snapped off as you tried to undo it, a stud extractor is not going to help one little bit. They have about 1/5th of the grip of the original bolt head.

Use a left handed drill and 9 times out of 10 the loose bolt will unscrew itself anyway ... if it doesn't; add the screw axtractor.

If it is truly rusted in and jammed and snaps off, set it up in a mill and drill it out, possibly going oversize and helicoiling it. Often just drilling to the thread minor diameter is all that is needed, the remains can be cleaned out with a tap.
 

penberth3

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Neither of those is suitable for removing jammed bolts. Ever.

People seem to think they are magic, they are not, they are designed for a purpose and that purpose is 100% NOT removing jammed bolts and studs. They are designed to remove *broken* bolts and studs. Bolts and studs that are free moving, but have been snapped off by overtightening or sheered off somehow. If the bolt was seized, and the head snapped off as you tried to undo it, a stud extractor is not going to help one little bit...

A useful reminder there!!!!
 
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