Sailing When Pregnant

johnalison

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Not so small, but I managed to make our pregnant daughter-in-law throw up off Beachy Head.

Pregnant women can normally put up with almost anything. The foetus is surrounded by fluid and thus protected from shocks. I would only say to her; just don't do anything you might personally regret if it went wrong, and here I would include parachute-jumping and horse-riding, but not sailing under normal conditions.
 

Dyflin

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My SWMBO can't even step up onto the boat, problem solved /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif

I did mention trying the MOB sling on her, [--word removed--] [--word removed--] [--word removed--] [--word removed--] off was her reply... /forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif
 

MoodySabre

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Daughter in law threw up a few times across Lyme Bay in 24 knots, 3 reefs and a very lumpy sea. We didn't know she was pregnant. My wife threw up too and she definitely wasn't on any count /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif /forums/images/graemlins/blush.gif /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif

I know several girls who ski when preggers and that must be more risky.
 

Avocet

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The last trip Mrs Avocet made on Avocet was when she was about 36 weeks pregant with our youngest son. To make matters worse, she was on crutches at the time because her pelvis had fallen to bits (apparently that sometimes happens)!

It was a lovely hot Sunday in 2005 and a colleague of mine had dropped in on his way South for an important meeting the following day. I'd been promising him a trip out for some time, and this seemed like a good day...

...There was very little wind, so I persuaded a (very reluctant) Mrs. A to come out for, well, more of a "float" than a "sail" with us. "just an hour or two on the tide", I said. "What could possibly go wrong"?

We did, indeed, enjoy a most pleasurable "float" that afternoon, having taken a picnic lunch. When the other kids started to get bored, I thought we might as well head back in but then heard a boat near us asking for a tow, having broken down. We passed him a line and motored off to the harbour - at which point things all started to go pear-shaped!

The lock gates had packed up and wouldn't open. The tide was on the ebb and the kids were bored. We motored round in circles with our tow for a while before casting him off and dropping anchor whilst listening to the VHF for any news on the gates. At this point, my name was mud. The kids were more bored, My colleague had a long drive ahead of him, Mrs. A was fed up, sweaty and uncomfortable...

...and the tide was ebbing fast!

In the end, I made a snap decision to try and motor into the outer harbour and put them all ashore on the steps cut into the harbour wall while I still had some water! I'd then go back out and anchor off until the next tide.

Avocet draws 4'6". There must have been a 6" swell in the outer harbour and about 5' of water! We'd lost so much tide that the steps next to us were completely covered in weed and shellfish - good, sharp, shellfish...

I held the boat as close as I dared without getting bashed against the wall - the boat's movement on the swell just spat the fenders out if they touched the wall. My colleague jumped ashore reasonably ably. My (then) 8 year old daughter did likewise, but made her displeasure pretty obvious. Then we had the fun task of passing our (then) 3 year old son up to my colleague with the aid of the boat hook. This drew a number of disapproving glances, head shaking and "tutting" noises from the many onlookers that had gathered to watch the fun.

Finally, poor Mrs. A, like a beachball with legs - but not quite as agile, had to try and time her jump onto the lowest step of the harbour wall! The depth sounder alarm was continuous and the display was just a dash by this time! The disapproving looks from the crowd turned almost hostile at the sight of my poor and very obviously heavily pregnant wife clawing her way up the steps. By the time I'd then thrown her crutches up to her, they were looking round for rotten fruit to start throwing at me!

Anyway, I then JUST about made it out to deep water, bumping the bottom a few times on the way out, and just as I cleared the wall, the lock gates opened!

At least I was then in a good position to be first in the dash for the lock and once through, was able to motor straight up to the pontoon just in time for my stony-faced family to take the mooring lines!

Strangely, she didn't fancy coming out again after that!
 

Gypsy

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My wife sailed during mth4-8 of her first pregnancy on our 7m wooden cruising boat. The biggest problem was her "watermelon" getting in the way towards the end. Our daughter who came from that pregnancy has never suffered motion sickness anywhere. But we couldn't sail when Mrs G was pregnant with our 2nd daughter and she has always been very susceptible to motion sickness. Does 1+1=2??
 

Amphitrite

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My wife sailed with me on our wooden 5 meter dinghy until she could not manage to get through between the boom and the centerplate-box any more when tacking...
 

Avocet

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Aye, I did feel quite bad about it afterwards /forums/images/graemlins/blush.gif- especially with Mrs. A suggesting I changed the name of the boat to "Bounty"! With hindsight, perhaps blowing up the tender and making a few trips to the beach with the rest of the crew might have been a more sensible option, but I guess transferring to that would have had it's own problems for a heavily pregant woman on crutches!
 
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