Sadler 290- Slab Reefing or In-mast Furling ?

cariad43

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We are also taking delivery of a 290 next year & it comes as standard with slab reefing. We wouldn't want to greatly diminish its performance, but we are now in our mid-sixties and naturally want to sail forever. We have never used mast furling but we understand that it is much easier to use particularly for the not-so-young or strong. What views would the panel have ?
 

lindsay

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At 71, and a singlehanded liveaboard in the Med hoping to continue indefinitely I am happy with in mast ( or rather behind the mast ) mainsail reefing.

For it?

It's easier to reduce sail when you need it, in 20 seconds from the cockpit.

It is safer since you never carry too much mainsail.

When the wind is over 22 knots or so, I am usually better off just sailing under partially furled genoa alone, up to 60 degs to the wind anyway. A furling main makes this a pleasure. Need to get closer hauled? Just let out a bit of mainsail and I see the difference.

If I see a squall coming I can get in the main as fast as the genoa, both in less than two minutes, and from the cockpit

At the end of a long, maybe tiring day, when you are arriving in a strange marina in a new country, getting down the mainsail is one less chore.

Against it?

The sail area will be smaller ( be careful with vertical battens if you are going behind the mast) and the shape "not quait right"

You will therefore lose speed on winds under 10 knots - on my boat, a Sadler 29 (the old one) it is the genoa anyway that provides most of the propulsion.

Additional weight on the mast if it is an add-on. So far nothing has falled down.

It will wear out quicker. Mine seems to last 6 to 7 years, but I sail 200 days a year.

What will people say? At our age who cares!

Finally, in mast is better than the added on behind the mast

Enjoy your new Sadler!
 
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maxwell edison

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My wife and I have given much thought to having a furling mainsail for the Sadler 290, which we are having next year, for the same reasons as you. But my reading and research has shown that whilst there are good arguments for it there are probably more against.

We will certainly upgrade the winches. We will also discuss, with the builders, the feasibility of installing electric winches. Phil at Doyle Sails reckons that just one, properly located, could serve all the winches. I am not so sure about that. Seems to me the cockpit would become a cats cradle. But I pass it on FWIW.

One of the joys of the Sadler 290 is its performance which, for a cruising boat, is outstanding. It would, in my view, be a shame to lessen that. And I think that even the most pro headsail furlers would accept that a lessening of performance is inevitable.

Also I have to face fact that at my age I do not have as many years sailing ahead of me as a man of 40 would. Consequently, sadly, the ultimate sale of the boat must feature in my considerations and I would expect that a Sadler 290 with a non standard rig would not be such an attractive proposition to a purchaser.
 

Birdseye

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[ QUOTE ]
We are also taking delivery of a 290 next year & it comes as standard with slab reefing. We wouldn't want to greatly diminish its performance, but we are now in our mid-sixties and naturally want to sail forever. We have never used mast furling but we understand that it is much easier to use particularly for the not-so-young or strong. What views would the panel have ?

[/ QUOTE ]

I sail sometimes with someone who has in mast furling and a vertically battened main. Admittedly, this is the add on type so a mast profile designed from the start to take in mast reefing might be better. But FWIW, its no easier than slab reefing lead back and can be difficult requiring that you have the boat dead into wind to wind the sail in without risk of jamming.

Not quite your age though getting close but I wouldnt consider in mast for a new boat - just dont think you gain anything in practise. Spend the money on laminated sails instead.
 

Billjratt

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Thought about in-boom reefing? Lines to cockpit, no extra weight aloft, beautiful fully-battened sail. If it were to jam, you just pull down the sail as normal and tie it on top of the boom for fixing at a more appropriate time.If inmast jams you may need the boun's chair which would be horrendous for a wrinkly in a gale on a lee shore. (Can she get you up there anyway?- electric anchor windlass..?.)
 

samwise

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I would recommend Maxi Roach. We had it on our old Sadler 29 as a behind the mast add-on. The big thing about Maxi Roach is the vertical battens , which help to maintain sail shape as you reef down. We found there was also less inclination for the sail to jam in the slot as you wound in, unlike many unbattened systems. We never had a jam while we had the boat. The only downside for the "aftermarket" fit as an add on to the standard mast, is the additional weight upstairs which could affect stability and righting moment but there should be no problem with a factory fit job. They also do a vertical batten genoa.
 

billmacfarlane

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As an owner of a performance cruiser I sympathise with your feelings, but there are surely other ways of making life easier without killing the performance of your boat which I think any form of in-mast reefing would do. What sort of slab reefing will your boat have ? Mine is a Kemp system with 2 lines per reef but is pulled in from the cockpit using either of the winches on the coachroof. If yours will be something similar I'd seriously think about upgrading to electric winches and an extra battery. Coupled with lazy jacks and a zip up bag for the mainsail, reefing should be a doddle - and you'll enjoy the Sadler for what it is. Good luck with whetever you decide and hope you enjoy the boat.
 

dt4134

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A little off the point I know, sorry, but has anyone obtained an IRC cert for a Sadler 290? I'm just curious to know if they can be raced competitively as a bilge keeler.
 

davehu

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Hi
Iam 63 now and sail with just my wife who is the same age and only 5ft 1ins tall so we do not have a lot of muscale power. We have a Vancouver 27. When we bought it it had behind the mast reefing. It ruined the sailing performance and the effort needed to roll and unroll the sail is quite a lot and if it sticks well thats a whole lot of trouble. I changed back to the standard slab reefing and the boat sails a whole lot better. My feelings are that the effort to reef the mainsail is very small compared to the effort to do other things on board, winching in the genoa etc. I believe that when the time comes for me to give up sailing it will not be because of the effort to reef the mainsail but because of anchor raising, genoa winching etc. Reeef early and its a whole lot easier and the boat goes almost as fast sometimes faster.

Good Luck
 
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maxwell edison

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I don't know if you need the certificate for it but a Sadler 290 performed extremely well in the Round Britain and Shetland Isles Race. Beat a good number of larger boats. You can find the details by Googling the race.
 
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maxwell edison

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Sorry, should have said that the boat in question was a twin keeler. The builders tell me that although, as Twister Ken says, a fin is an option they have yet to be asked to build one.
 

dt4134

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The big question is whether the RORC rating office would distinguish between bilge keels and twin keels. Which gets the better number?

I'm sure she'll go very well with a fin keel, but with the ballast ratio and sail area I'm sure she'd be appropriately rated.
 

Geordie

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I would recommend in mast furling. As Lindsay said, it is a safety factor. Furling is so easy that you don't think twice about reefing. Sail plan (with rolling genoa) is infinitely variable and is easily adjusted to suit conditions.

Yes performance does suffer but, for a cruising sailor, not greatly

Regards

Geordie
 
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