Rudderless Rassy

johnalison

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I don't think those old Rassys were very manoeuvrable even with a rudder. The rudders on those boats are not particularly vulnerable. I can't remember if they have a skeg or not. My much later 34 has a token skeg only but a substantial s/s rudder post. I can only suppose that the rudder had suffered water ingress and been weakened, but perhaps we shall find out in due course.
 

Concerto

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The report uses typical dramatic wording, but it may mean the rudder did not break or drop out, more likely the steering controls broke or jammed.

In answer to the OP's worry about losing half of the rudder, yes there would be limited control from a smaller rudder. Back in the 1970's were were trying a new plywood rudder on a Nicholson 30, when it snapped at the height of the small skeg and loosing ¾ of the area. By moving as much weight aft to ensure as much of the transom hung rudder was in the water, we managed to get her the 10 miles home without assistance.
 

Just_sayin'

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You could well be right .... but I'm not sure. :)

Richard

Um.

A rudder apparently fell off a Rassy.

I wondered if anyone knew any more details hence the “any thoughts” question.

If it had snapped in half, the half above the skeg “should” have given some manoeuvrability.

To lose a whole rudder is rare.

Sorry for any confusion caused :encouragement:
 

Daydream believer

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Rudders do not necessarily have to break across the blade. I grounded my Hanse on a shallow bank & the rudder dropped vertically onto a boulder & split it like a walnut & half floated away.

It was badly constructed in the first place & I now have a decent rudder. However, if the HR encountered a similar incident at some time (of course, one can only speculate) this could be the start of it. A skeg would make very little difference


.rudder(600 x 448).jpg
 
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pvb

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With that era of HR designs, the rudder blade sits inside a strong bronze framework, and is bolted through in many places. The skeg is the full depth of the rudder. I'd guess the yacht in the news report suffered steering cable failure.
 

KevinT1

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With that era of HR designs, the rudder blade sits inside a strong bronze framework, and is bolted through in many places. The skeg is the full depth of the rudder. I'd guess the yacht in the news report suffered steering cable failure.
That was my conclusion as well, the journalistic licence also mentioned they had lost their anchor - whilst the RNLI report said the anchor couldn’t be recovered and so was buoyed for later recovery
 
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