Roger's relenltess Centaur fettling

dylanwinter

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Roger's relentless Centaur fettling

Roger of this parish has been doing up his dad.s old Centaur for a number of years now

It lives in his back garden and he is utterly transforming the boat from one of the dullest yachts ever made into a transport of delight.

he is redesigning the interior, new engine, new rig

he brought the boat ashore and put it in his back garden

crane over roof scenario

https://picasaweb.google.com/110182886418433827802/InTheAir2

then he rebuilt the keels

https://picasaweb.google.com/110182886418433827802/TheFinishedKeels

then he built a polytarp Centaur shrine

https://picasaweb.google.com/110182886418433827802/CanopySurgery

then he refinished the hull

https://picasaweb.google.com/110182886418433827802/Pictures

and is now working out ways to improve their aerodynamic efficiency

https://picasaweb.google.com/110182886418433827802/LaserTechnology

here are more snaps

https://picasaweb.google.com/110182886418433827802

and his website is here

http://www.agentlemansyacht.com/

I should add that I have spent many hours sailing with Roger and he did the delivery trip up to scotland with me and Jon - 500 miles three blokes

http://www.keepturningleft.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/the-last-supper-300x225.jpg

I slept like a baby when he was on watch - he is an excellent sailor

I hope he enjoys fettling as much as he enjoys sailing because

fekme.... his ratio of sailing to fettling is insane
 
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rogerthebodger

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Congrats from another Roger who has also built/finished his own boat.

Pics on photoshop at URL in sig
 

Concerto

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Not sure if this is just a Roger problem.

I have been renovating a Westerly Fulmar over the past 18 months, plus sailing last summer. There are plenty of photos on Concerto's photobucket. This link takes you to what Concerto looked like when I bought her.
http://s1294.photobucket.com/user/ConcertoFulmar32/library/?sort=3&page=6
Just work through the pages and see the massive changes.

For more detail on exactly what I have done can be read on the Westerly Owners Forum.
http://www.westerly-owners.co.uk/woaforum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=2748

By the way I am a Roger as well.
 

William_H

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West Australia
Sadly I am not a Roger and in radio parlance around here Roger has been replaced by Romeo. I have devoloped a deal with my little boat which fortunately is easily loaded onto trailer. Every autumn in April I bring her home with a list of jobs to be done. Just before the last weekend in Sept usually about the Thursday she goes back in ready for club opening day on the Sunday. In between times I am a happy fettler. All the rest of the time she is ready to go.
I do enjoy the fettling though on a very small scale (except the antifouling painting) but I also enjoy the sailing. I kind of wish a year was only 6 months long. By the end of sailing season I have had enough. By the end of winter I just want to go sailing. So good luck to all the fettlers but sailing is pretty good too. olewill
 

Tam Lin

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Coo! And I thought I had done some work to Tam Lin! I realise now that I am not in the same league. There I was getting worried that I was becoming a full time fettler just because the boat was not launched for two years and now I know that I had nothing to worry about!
 

dylanwinter

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Coo! And I thought I had done some work to Tam Lin! I realise now that I am not in the same league. There I was getting worried that I was becoming a full time fettler just because the boat was not launched for two years and now I know that I had nothing to worry about!

Roger is the universal measuring stick of yacht fettling - for time, for quality of work, for innovation

his is the work/dedication by which all others must be judged
 
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First two done, two more to do............................................

WP_20150721_15_23_15_Pro.jpg


WP_20150721_15_23_21_Pro.jpg


cheers
 
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Re: Roger's relentless Centaur fettling

Not quite sure what the fuss is about as i still regularly crew aboard mates boats so i still keep a hand in and what i've done above can be done by anyone, its really not difficult, i'd not done any composite work before this project,

All you need is the ability to pick yourself up and have another go and then another go and then another go and.................................(you get the idea) until you get the hang of it, people i realise are generally quite lazy when it comes to learning, either through fear of fukking up or just cant be bothered to take the time.

A quick look down the threads here illustrates my point perfectly, we now live in the age of the 'expert' who after all is just someone whos either done the same job many times over for a long period of time or in most cases i've experienced is just someone whos actually bothered to read the manual!

What i've done and am doing is nothing special it more over illustrates (to me) how far both the intellectual / practical-common sense bar has been lowered, and more importantly the type of boat owner that now exists, for example the boatyard in which my boat lived whilst in my fathers ownership was a hub of people doing their own work and solving problems with nothing more than 45Gallon drums, wooden wedges, large-section timber and decent quality rope and this to tackle all manner of boat-based maladies...............Those days are long gone.

In my professional sphere too i've seen some of the most complex problems solved building houses with nothing more than GCSE level maths and scaffold bars, dont get me wrong i'm not knocking highly qualified professionals, you need them and i've certainly used them in the past on big jobs, not so much now as tend to just make and install furniture but i'm constantly bewildered by some of the jobs people think require specialist knowledge or attention.

Take the power back and do it yourself..................learn something - you might just surprise yourself ..............................................or be found dead under your boat, YMMV.
 
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rob2

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Re: Roger's relentless Centaur fettling

Hear, hear!

Even in our club boatyard I'm often horrified by the percentage of people who aren't willing to pick up more than a paintbrush (and often demonstrate their incompetence even with that). Things follow the path of least resistance and another pet hate is the assumption that "It's the law...". This turns out more often than not to be untrue as our limitations are being set by the restrictions placed upon us by insurance cover (nobody heard of a waiver?) or an assumption of Elfin Safety. If anyone actually read the Health and Safety regulations they would find that they apply to the behaviour of employers/employees and they only require basic common sense. So if something is dangerous, you can still do it, but you should ensure nothing is going to fall on passers by - prevent people passing by.

Rob.
 

rogerthebodger

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Re: Roger's relentless Centaur fettling

100% agree Roger.

What bugs me some times in the use of the word "Professional" to try to indicate a "Professional job" where IMHO that work means some one who earns maney from what he does and is no indication of the quality of the job. In fact a skilled amateur job can be better as cost is not the prime motivation.
 

ghostlymoron

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Hear, hear!

Even in our club boatyard I'm often horrified by the percentage of people who aren't willing to pick up more than a paintbrush (and often demonstrate their incompetence even with that). Things follow the path of least resistance and another pet hate is the assumption that "It's the law...". This turns out more often than not to be untrue as our limitations are being set by the restrictions placed upon us by insurance cover (nobody heard of a waiver?) or an assumption of Elfin Safety. If anyone actually read the Health and Safety regulations they would find that they apply to the behaviour of employers/employees and they only require basic common sense. So if something is dangerous, you can still do it, but you should ensure nothing is going to fall on passers by - prevent people passing by.

Rob.
Health and safety law covers the actions of employers/employees in the course of their work. I'm only familiar with the construction industry which basically says you must assess the risks of what you're proposing and take steps to reduce them to an acceptable level. Its done a great deal to save life and injury but can appear unnecessarily beaurocratic. In a lot of cases where there are no significant risks, it should be acceptable to state that fact rather than list some extremely minor risks applying to, say, photocopying, just to comply with the legislation.
As a private individual, you can do what you like with impunity as you are only endangering youself but it makes sense to apply the same criteria to ensure your own 'elfin safety'.
 

dylanwinter

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Interesting comments from Roger,

He is still the right side of 40

the years stretch away

I am 60 now so for me yard time - especially in the summer - is time away from sailing

tomorrow I might feel a twinge in my back, my knee, my prostate or my ticker and that is the end of sailing. I will never get those days back.

if I had the resources I would go out and buy a brand new twin wheel cheese wedge,do no maintenance at all - just turn up with a bag of clothes and go sailing after having made the phone calls to get another man to slap on the anti-foul for me.

I am heading up to the boat this week and I have a day of fettling scheduled for tuesday

just a few hours with a varnish brush, a bit of soldering on my pathetic electric system and a pit of a flash around with the glue gun to re-stick the cabin liner back in place followed by a deep clean.

I see it as a day less sailing

I will still be in Lossiemouth marina come Tuesday night as opposed to spending the night on the hook in Dornoch or the Old Bar (an estuary lads).

I will take no pleasure in the fixing and fettling.

Roger is, to my mind, a mad genius

His boat will be one of the wonders of the world

but....I would rather be sailing a shit boat than forever fettling my way towards perfection.

D

PS - still looking for a dead Centaur
 
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I should say as a post script to my above comment i tend to forget most you here are very old and quite demented so i totally understand why you dont want to get your hands dirty but for the remaining dozen or so of you under pensionable age here, you know - why not give it a go.;)
 

IanH

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I should say as a post script to my above comment i tend to forget most you here are very old and quite demented so i totally understand why you dont want to get your hands dirty but for the remaining dozen or so of you under pensionable age here, you know - why not give it a go.;)

Earlier this year I followed a link on one of Dylan's threads to your website. Until very recently I have been wondering if you had given up but perhaps work got in the way or you were having too much fun in the van. But now several new posts now - phew.

Anyway your site has inspired me to get on with my little jouster. I'm probably making a mistake starting on the inside but have spent several weeks and I have no idea how many hours with a small scraper getting old headlining backing foam and glue off. It is very slow going but you, I am sure, have mentioned how important prep is, and so I am trying to do it properly. I was going to say that it is tedious but actually it is therapeutic after a day in the office to just get on with a mindless task.

Problem is that I am doing no sailing at all and thinking ahead to getting her out of the water. I really must get hold of or try to build a cradle (fin keel so won't stand up on her own which is a pain).

Please keep the website postings coming it has been a fascinating read and I highly recommend to anyone who hasn't looked at it that they do so.

Thanks to Dylan for putting me on to it as well.

Cheers

Ian

P.S. I am older than you but not yet a pensioner (15 years to go).
 
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