Plastic washboards.

Allan

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I am going to sort out some plastic washboard. They will not be fitted with a lock, just used to keep the weather out and let the light in. I don't know which plastic to use. They will be 10mm thick to fit well into the slot. Any suggestions on material/suppliers?
Allan
 

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FWIW, I have knocked up stuff like that from scrap bits & never worried about them having a good fit in the slot. Just let them overlap slightly (so that rain & spray runs off) & they don't rattle cos the edges touch the slot, & because of the tapered shape they can't drop too low. You could also glue strips down the sides to stiffen & thicken them.

Getting "exactly the right stuff" can substantially increase the cost, whereas old scraps "that will do" can sometimes be picked up for buttons. But then, maybe you have "loadsamoney" & everything must be perfect?
 

duncan99210

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B&Q supply sheets of claer plastic in various thicknesses, one of which should be ok for you washboards. They have fairly small bits available which are not too expensive. Watch it when cutting, as the stuff cacks fairly easily. I've used an electric jigsaw with a fine blade - don't use a hacksaw blade, as it's too fine and tends to heat up, with the result that the plastic welds itself back together just behind the blade.....
 

Allan

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FWIW, I have knocked up stuff like that from scrap bits & never worried about them having a good fit in the slot. Just let them overlap slightly (so that rain & spray runs off) & they don't rattle cos the edges touch the slot, & because of the tapered shape they can't drop too low. You could also glue strips down the sides to stiffen & thicken them.

Getting "exactly the right stuff" can substantially increase the cost, whereas old scraps "that will do" can sometimes be picked up for buttons. But then, maybe you have "loadsamoney" & everything must be perfect?
Whilst I may sound a little like Harry Enfield's "Loadsamoney", I sail on a very tight budget. I like to try and do the best job for the right price. Where am I likely to find some scrap bits? Do you know what material would be best?
Allan
 

Tranona

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Any local sign maker will cut them for you. As you say, it is worth doing the job properly. You can use either acrylic (perspex) or Polycarbornate, which is stronger. 8 or 9mm is tough stuff to cut yourself, so I would get it cut and the edge polished by the sign maker. If in two parts have him cut them horizontally with a 45 degree cut , the lower side on the outside. Also then worth putting a moulding batten across the join. Made properly they will last the life of the boat!
 

chinita

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Any local sign maker will cut them for you. As you say, it is worth doing the job properly. You can use either acrylic (perspex) or Polycarbornate, which is stronger. 8 or 9mm is tough stuff to cut yourself, so I would get it cut and the edge polished by the sign maker. If in two parts have him cut them horizontally with a 45 degree cut , the lower side on the outside. Also then worth putting a moulding batten across the join. Made properly they will last the life of the boat!

Agreed, for a proper job.

However, If you do decide to do it your self and start cutting, cover the 'line' with masking tape
 

Allan

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Many years ago I cut some plastic sheet using a tenon saw. I used a length of timber to keep the saw vertical and cut it slowly, keeping all the teeth on the surface of the plastic. I plan to do the same, if having it professionally cut is too expensive.
Allan
 

Tranona

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Many years ago I cut some plastic sheet using a tenon saw. I used a length of timber to keep the saw vertical and cut it slowly, keeping all the teeth on the surface of the plastic. I plan to do the same, if having it professionally cut is too expensive.
Allan

Think you will be surprised how little it costs as it only takes a few minutes if you have the right saw. The material in that size/thickness is quite expensive unless you are lucky and get an off cut.
 

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A word of warning. All the plastics mentioned so far are heavier than water. If you accidentally drop one overboard then, unlike wood, it will sink.

Remember to have some way of preventing the washboards from falling out in the unlikely event of a capsize. Being upsidedown with no washboards is not a fun way of sailing.
 

reginaldon

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I used clear plastic carpet protector, taking a wedge from the center and sewing up also sewing two tubes across to accommodate bungies - leave up or drop down for protection from elements. I'm afraid the cold weather this winter has made it all too brittle.
 

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I couldn't fit the door on Aquaplane from the inside so I cut a bit out of an Ikea 99p shower curtain. A bit of self adhesive velcro on the curtain and on the back of the sliding hatch and it kept the rain out great. You need to moor head to wind though or it just blows in and you get wet.
 

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Whilst I may sound a little like Harry Enfield's "Loadsamoney", I sail on a very tight budget. I like to try and do the best job for the right price. Where am I likely to find some scrap bits? Do you know what material would be best?
Allan

Sorry, I wasn't having a go, but I am aware that my Steptoe cruising is often the butt of sneers & jibes from those less fiscally challenged. I have aquired bits of shop display, covers for technical eqt & junk in skips over the years. But Signwriters may have some suitable stuff that is left over from larger signs, but too small for other uses. You may not get much choice in the matter of colour tho'. Good luck & look hard & hopefully the boat will look good too.
 

Allan

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Sorry, I wasn't having a go, but I am aware that my Steptoe cruising is often the butt of sneers & jibes from those less fiscally challenged. I have aquired bits of shop display, covers for technical eqt & junk in skips over the years. But Signwriters may have some suitable stuff that is left over from larger signs, but too small for other uses. You may not get much choice in the matter of colour tho'. Good luck & look hard & hopefully the boat will look good too.
Don't worry mate, I didn't take offence. I love the term Steptoe cruising, that is new to me, I tend to be more of a Lidlaldi sailor. Thanks for your advice.
As far as the other answers are concerned, many thanks for all of them. I take the points about not floating etc. I feel we will only be using the plastic when not sailing to keep out weather while letting light in. At sea, in all but the most benign conditions, we will stick with the wooden boards that are locked in place.
Allan
 

Searush

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Don't worry mate, I didn't take offence. I love the term Steptoe cruising, that is new to me, I tend to be more of a Lidlaldi sailor. Thanks for your advice.
As far as the other answers are concerned, many thanks for all of them. I take the points about not floating etc. I feel we will only be using the plastic when not sailing to keep out weather while letting light in. At sea, in all but the most benign conditions, we will stick with the wooden boards that are locked in place.
Allan

Steptoe Cruising? I just made it up! :D

Using clear w/b for evenings, cold or rainy days at anchor is great - esp if you don't have a boom tent, sometimes even if you do! A bit more light below means you can read & it doesn't feel like nighttime at 3pm. Also useful if you have kids below & want to be able to see ech other yet not let them get too cold or wet.

BTW, I think you'd be very unlucky to drop W/B over the side or turn turtle when family cruising in UK coastal waters during the summer. But if they are cheap, it won't matter losing them & I always arrange mine to be locked in place by the main hatch anyway.
 
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I am going to sort out some plastic washboard. They will not be fitted with a lock, just used to keep the weather out and let the light in. I don't know which plastic to use. They will be 10mm thick to fit well into the slot. Any suggestions on material/suppliers?
Allan

For what you are wanting I would be inclined to use the twin wall polycarbonate which is used in conservatory roofs. I've managed to get off cuts from conservatory manufacturers for next to nothing.

If you want to make sure that it doesn't sink then find some way to seal the ends and it will float forever.

Just remember that the stuff is so light that it will blow away in the slightest breeze!

If it has to be cheap then forget perspex, unless you are going to put thin stuff into some kind of frame, the thickness you want will be too expensive.

The same applies to other plastics in sheet form.

FWIW No. 1. I made perspex boards last year. I used 12mm smoked which cost about £60. I'm lucky to have the right tools as I certainly would not want to do it by hand. They have made an enormous difference, particularly when we are down below with foul weather outside.

FWIW No. 2. I know that everyone says you can get the stuff from sign makers but, in my experience, that just isn't so. The material we want for boats is a little specialist and I tried lots of suppliers, always with the same answer...."Yes, we can do it for you sir but we'll have to charge you for a full sheet" If I had wanted thinner material, either clear or an opaque colour it wouldn't have been a problem.
 
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