Piracy - yes again (AIS this time)

Bilgediver

Well-known member
Joined
6 Jun 2001
Messages
8,120
Location
Scotland
Visit site
Has AIS given Pirates/Terrorists an advantage, since they can now 'shop' till they drop, using on-line information?

http://www.marinetraffic.com/ais/

No ships in the Indian Ocean :D

These most of sites rely on information fed to them by volunteer stations around the world. As these are mostly land based then more than 30/40 miles offshore is not covered. If the pirates have AIS on the mother ship then they could identify targets in range however I believe some ships are not transmitting AIS in regions of risk.

The Malacca Straits pirates could use this as the Straits are narrow.
 

alant

Active member
Joined
30 May 2001
Messages
37,600
Location
UK - Solent region
Visit site
No ships in the Indian Ocean :D

These most of sites rely on information fed to them by volunteer stations around the world. As these are mostly land based then more than 30/40 miles offshore is not covered. If the pirates have AIS on the mother ship then they could identify targets in range however I believe some ships are not transmitting AIS in regions of risk.

The Malacca Straits pirates could use this as the Straits are narrow.

Plenty Port Said end of suez canal, so they just might be going south.
 

EugeneR

Well-known member
Joined
21 Aug 2009
Messages
1,225
Location
Hamble
Visit site
When I was berthed in Port Solent, my neighbor was quite used to long distance cruising. Never mind disabling AIS, when cruising in open / risky waters he actively reduced his radar footprint. He relied on a small gadget with 4 LED's that could detect other boats' radar without himself being seen.

Regarding marinetraffic.com/ais, I was wondering if one could use that to ease crossing the channel's shipping lanes since, except for the bit right in the middle, I usually seem to get a mobile signal. Of course, it doesn't calculate CPA from one's own position but surely it could be added to their Android version on a suitable device?
 

Twister_Ken

Well-known member
Joined
31 May 2001
Messages
27,585
Location
'ang on a mo, I'll just take some bearings
Visit site
Regarding marinetraffic.com/ais, I was wondering if one could use that to ease crossing the channel's shipping lanes since, except for the bit right in the middle, I usually seem to get a mobile signal. Of course, it doesn't calculate CPA from one's own position but surely it could be added to their Android version on a suitable device?

No guarantee that posns are up to date. It would seem to be a better idea to look out for ships with your built-in stereoscopic ocular equipment.
 

Conachair

Guest
Joined
24 Jan 2004
Messages
5,162
Location
London
Visit site
No guarantee that posns are up to date. It would seem to be a better idea to look out for ships with your built-in stereoscopic ocular equipment.

Agree. But it is a cool site, thanks for the link alant. just checked it with the ais & indeed the typhoo clipper heading down the Thames matches up on both :cool: Each click on a vessel shows among other things how long ago the last data was recieved so maybe a mobile across the channel might work. i certainly wouldn't rely on it but would be interesting to play with.

So how many people here have boats transmitting & where are they??

As for pirates shopping online.... doubt it somehow.
 

Baggywrinkle

Well-known member
Joined
6 Mar 2010
Messages
9,728
Location
Ammersee, Bavaria / Adriatic & Free to roam Europe
Visit site
When I was berthed in Port Solent, my neighbor was quite used to long distance cruising. Never mind disabling AIS, when cruising in open / risky waters he actively reduced his radar footprint. He relied on a small gadget with 4 LED's that could detect other boats' radar without himself being seen.

Your neighbour wasn't smuggling was he? :eek:
 

Capt Cautious

New member
Joined
19 Jan 2011
Messages
173
Visit site
The pirates motherships are fully equipped with AIS, as they were when they took them. They have coverage wherever they are in the Indian Ocean, and propogation in that part of the world is extreme, its not unusual to pick up AIS targets at 200 miles. So the the answer is - we switch our AIS off unless specifically asked by coalition forces to switch it on - and then its low power for as short time as possible.
CC
 
Top