Norfolk Broads Boat Safety Certificate - anyone got one recently?

fredrussell

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I'm hoping to get my boat on the Broads this autumn for a week or two. The previous owner used her on the Broads so boat came with a decent A-frame and deck fittings for mast lowering. I'm pretty sure this was more than 4 years ago though so his certificate has almost certainly expired.

If anyone has had the boat safety certificate done recently I'd be interested to know roughly how much it cost and whats involved. I can't seem to find a complete list of areas checked on the web - this page shows recent amendments to test not the full list as far as I can see: http://www.boatsafetyscheme.org/media/195630/summary of key ecp changes jan 2013 final 1.0.pdf

If anyone knows where the full test criteria are listed I'd appreciate a link to it, or any info re test and its cost would be good.

cheers
fred
 

Alpha22

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As a visitor you should not require one to get a temporary licence, but you have to declare that you are generally compliant with all the regulations. As you have had one in the past, this should not fundamentally be a problem.

FYI, Each examiner can charge what they want... but expect to pay about £90, depending on travel, if you have gas onboard, depending if they do free retests...?? and other stuff.

The certificate is not Broads specific, it started on the canals and now covers almost all inland waterways.. Thames, Anglian, Canals and rivers.

The procedure is not a secret..... all here for your information. But like any test, the application of the rules sadly vary from examiner to examiner.
http://www.boatsafetyscheme.org/media/268789/ecp-private-boats-ed3_rev2_apr2015_public_final.pdf
 

ianc1200

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My Crabber is at Titchmarsh, Walton on the Naze, Essex, and we decided on a permanent move to the Broads for a couple of years, so a BSS Certificate is required, it cost £220 and from arranging for the surveyor, the survey, the minor bits of work needed, and getting the Certificate took about 6 weeks (the surveyor was busy, I took time getting the bits done etc).
 

AntarcticPilot

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Perhaps someone else will correct me, but although the vast majority of the BSS makes equally good sense for both sea-going and fresh-water boats, I understand there are some minor issues where a sea-going boat will, for good and sufficient reasons, depart from the requirements of the BSS. For example, I understand that transparent sight bowls and so on are not permitted in the BSS; most sea-going installations have them so you can check for water in your fuel easily, and I have a transparent plastic sight tube for checking my fuel level - again, running out of fuel would be a more serious matter when miles from the nearest harbour than on the inland waterways.

I stand to be corrected!
 

ianc1200

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My surveyor specifically mentioned that as an issue, luckily my boat doesn't have either, but it does have a semi clear Vetus plastic fuel tank which I was worried about, but wasn't picked up upon). Surely it's easy enough to change the glass bowl/cap off the fuel sight tube for the examination & when you're on inland waters. In the past there have been more fundamental issues less easy to alter & alter back again (it was to do with ventilation & the danger of openings into the craft whilst at sea, but I believe there an exemption).
 

Alpha22

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Glass/plastic bowls on fuel filters are OK, as long as they are not in the engines space. If they are in the same space as the engines then they can be swapped for metal. The other part to watch is the drain plug.... for the same reasons it must be changed for metal.

Ventilation is an issue for sea going boats. The required BSS ventilation cannot be closed, but there is an exemption for sea going boats, but there must be a warning notice fixed by the vent to indicate it must be open when cooking.

Plastic fuel tanks all OK as long as designed for the purpose.

Sea toilets CAN be a fail point, but if they are isolated by turning off the sea cock and locked, they generally pass.
 
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