Momentary switches and LED' to test a CanBus?

Ian_Edwards

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My Southerly came with a CanBus system made EmpirBus, it now 12 years old and I need to test some parts of it.

I have the EmpirBus configuration software running on a laptop and the USB to CanBus interface, so I can see what's going on on the bus and change things around. I also have a spare base module and a couple of spare I/O boards.

I'm working towards setting up a simple system on "on the kitchen table", with just one module and then swapping out I/O boards to find out which ones are faulty.

I plan to use 8 momentary switches on the input and LED's to shown when the output MOSFET's have switch on or off.

I could build something out of discrete components, individual switches and LED's with current limiting resistors. It's a nominal 12 volt system, driven from a small AGM scooter battery. However, it would be much easier and quicker if I could find a membrane switch panel with 8 switches or more and an array of LED's, preferable running directly off 12 volts.

I've spent some time searching the net without finding anything which would make building the test harness quicker and easier to build.

What do those who play with micro controllers, Raspberry Pie's or similar use to test their projects?

Has anyone any ideas on where I could buy appropriate modules?
 

vas

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wouldn't it be easy enough to setup a breadboard with leds and their respective resistors plus all the other bits you'd need?
canbus switches possibly need a 10K resistor as well to operate?
good luck as I also have a can bussed boat (and a house) to maintain and program (reminded me to change some settings...)

V.
 

Lon nan Gruagach

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My Southerly came with a CanBus system made EmpirBus, it now 12 years old and I need to test some parts of it.

I have the EmpirBus configuration software running on a laptop and the USB to CanBus interface, so I can see what's going on on the bus and change things around. I also have a spare base module and a couple of spare I/O boards.

I'm working towards setting up a simple system on "on the kitchen table", with just one module and then swapping out I/O boards to find out which ones are faulty.

I plan to use 8 momentary switches on the input and LED's to shown when the output MOSFET's have switch on or off.

I could build something out of discrete components, individual switches and LED's with current limiting resistors. It's a nominal 12 volt system, driven from a small AGM scooter battery. However, it would be much easier and quicker if I could find a membrane switch panel with 8 switches or more and an array of LED's, preferable running directly off 12 volts.

I've spent some time searching the net without finding anything which would make building the test harness quicker and easier to build.

What do those who play with micro controllers, Raspberry Pie's or similar use to test their projects?

Has anyone any ideas on where I could buy appropriate modules?

switches resistors and leds... if you are messing with electronics then, while this might not be an off the shelf module, its second nature.
 

matthewriches

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It's probably something you'll need to build. I have used micro momentary "halo" switches from Amazon and eBay to replace a few that were fitted to a Sealine system. Worked well. Note resistances as mentioned above but check to see exactly what you need. You don't want to be blowing the system by trying to fix it!
 

prv

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Presumably the inputs and outputs are individually wired to screw terminals or similar on the input and output modules?

That being the case, it's hard to see how anything could be much simpler to set up than a "12v LED" (actually an LED pre-assembled with a suitable resistor in series) on 6" flying leads. Buttons likewise, though pre-wired ones are probably less common and you'd need to connect the short leads yourself.

I've seen basic 12-digit number pads with individual contact outputs for each button, if that helps - but I don't think it does :)

Pete
 
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