Mastless catamaran with a wishbone instead

tudorsailor

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I saw this cat in Andratx last week. Never seen this mastless arangement before. Is this a one off?

IMG_0053.jpg


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snowleopard

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I've seen a few of these. I'm not sure what advantages it brings. You get rid of the shrouds but there will be just as much windage and I doubt the weight is any less.
 

jamesjermain

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The mast is certainly one-off, though not unique. A-frame masts have been experimented with since the 50s for certain and probably long before that. The Amateur Yacht Research Society has, I'm sure, lots of papers on the subject. What the boat under it is, I don't know, though it has a Woodsish look about it.

I thing the main advantage is supposed to be a clean air flow over the luff of the main. While this may be true, the disadvantages, such as cost, the lack of overlapping headsails, probably increased windage overal land, unless carbon fibre is used, weight, make it a non-starter in my book
 

GlennG

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I suppose that on a cat there's the advantage of passing the load directly into each hull as opposed to the awkward catenery arrangement with a triangle to pass the load from the bottom of the mast across the deck.

May even find it will be more cost-effective and more flexible in a cat as it frees up space under and forward of the mast.
 

snowleopard

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Given that the main beam passes under the mast position on most cats and that there has to be a stout structure for the foot of the 'mainsail' stay, I don't think there would be much benefit.
 

Adamastor

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I think the explanation I heard: that the A-Frame affords the ultimate simplicity in sail-handling, is the most acceptable answer. Actually, I think the reason it's found popularity with cruisers is that all one needs is two genny-furlers- the rest of the rig being made of ali piping.
Have a look here: these folk are just down the road from me and are doing a very creditable job of building custom A-Frame cats!
 

snowleopard

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I can see the attraction of a free-furling main which would be a lot less prone to failure than an in-mast arrangement. I'd be interested to see how they lead the sheets for the main. I think short-tacking would be best avoided!
 

tim_ber

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Dr David Lewis, who wrote Ice Bird, Girls of 2 Oceans and a few other books, had a cat with a similar(ish) rig in 1960's I think.

The loading at mast steps was huge.

It failed and he re-rigged more traditionally.
 
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