Internal Wooden Window Trim.

OGITD

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Internal Wooden Window Trim.

Does anyone know of a supplier of internal wooden window trim?
I have peeled back the vinyl cabin lining to carry out repairs to the balsa sandwich, and I have seen pictures of this type of finish on other boats.
Also to be totally honest some wooden trim over the balsa covering the edges between the internal and external glass mouldings looks much better than glued vinyl.

Thanking all for help in this matter.
 

sparkie

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I'll be watching this carefully myself, have the same problem. Old glue now turning yellow and looking 'orrid. Was thinking of new frames complete in aluminium but hardwood internally sounds much better. Would be easy to make straight bits of frame but mine are well curved.
 

nimbusgb

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This the kind of thing you are looking to do?

I have made curved corner pieces , each frame is made of straight and curved mouldings.

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( The panels are still covered in protective plastic coating )
 

OGITD

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Very nice, and would be “fit for purpose”.
If I cannot locate the curved corner pieces (straight edges not a problem) I think it’s going to be a case of learning how to steam bend wood.
 

Cliveshep

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If you want to steam-bend wood hardwoods respond better than softwoods but all expand quite a lot in the process and need to be thoroughly dried out afterwards. You'll need a steam source and sorry, neither the kettle with the lid wedged on nor your wall-paper stripper can make enough steam to do the job properly. I used an old calor or similar gas bottle, removed the valve and purged it, and welded a bit of 1" gas pipe into the top. I insulated the "boiler" with Rockwool quilt lasheed with wire to improve the steram quality. A piece of rubber steam hose (heating suppliers) led from this to a steam box made of spiral wound galvanised duct heavily insulated and with ends plugged except for small holes to allow steam to flow out. That is important as total sealing prevents the flow of fresh hot steam through the steam box. Heat-source was a bitumen burner on a gas bottle, you can hire those, and the "boiler" was half-filled with water. This was used quite successfully to bend 7" x 1 1/4" oak plank but it was a bugger to bend round the former and took 4 of us still to heave it round and clamp it.

Frankly, I think you might do better by investing in one of B & Q or Focus or similar cheapo routers and cutting the curves out from glued up solid timber properly scarfed together so the grain progressively changes direction around your planned curve. You can make the router follow a curve by attaching it to a batten or strip of metal anchored at the end giving the radii you want. I'm not getting into arguments about glues, although I used to get good results from Aerolite 500 (if they still do that).
 

nimbusgb

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[ QUOTE ]
As an afterthought, you could provide a template to a joinery outfit with a spindle moulder and get them to do it for you

[/ QUOTE ]

I tried that with a local joinery firm. I wanted to do 5 full sized door surrounds and 13 small cabinet openings. Quote was for £2000 plus VAT.

New Router, Bandsaw and Planer/thicknesser ex ebay - total £350

Bits, g cramps etc etc another £150.

Lots of fun in the garage and at the end I'll have the tools still!
 

sparkie

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Nimbus they are very impressive. Bit beyond my limited capability and equipment I fear, but they look just the job. Did you machine the corners out of a solid piece or are they laminated as suggested above?
 

nimbusgb

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Thanks, quite chuffed with them myself. I machined the corners out of solid material. Kiln dried sapele mahogany just wasn't going to get round those radii. That and the fact that they are rebated so they cover the edge of the cutouts and would have required a better setup than my cheap router table.

I did consider ripping 1.5mm wide strips of timber and then laminating them around a former but life's a little too short for that although the result would have been really nice.
 

Captain Coochie

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Do you know if the internal curve is a standard size ? If it is it would be very easy for me to set a machine up to knock a few out . If it varies as i think it would then it would be a bit of a pain .
 

nimbusgb

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My benne has 5 'people' doors, the corner radii are all the same although the width and height of the doors varies. There are 13 or so cabinet doors of a variety of sizes, all have the same corner radii.

Wish you'd seen my earlier posts ( couple of months ago ) about making these trims, still I now have some nice tools and I can say 'I made the woodwork' /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
 

kirielad

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Nimbus - fantastic job and just what I've been looking for to closeout the window surrounds on my 720, rather than the white plastic 'hockey stick' which a lot of trimmers seem to use.

Could you explain what you used regarding jigs, router bits, etc (or even a quote for a set if I were to provide the templates ?) /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif
 

Captain Coochie

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If you want to make them yourself the safest way would be to use a bearing guided flush cutter in a router and a jig . You will probably find that the radius is the size of a standard hole cutter so making the jig is as easy as drilling a hole in a bit of ( ply ) or what ever else you have to hand . Cut your timber roughly to size and then trim it up using the router and jig .
 

nimbusgb

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Mark up pieces on 19mm sapele stock.
Rough cut outside using bandsaw.
Accurate trim using hand tools/ sander to ensure 90 degrees outside edge
Screw 'handle' to one face to allow holding piece to rebate first edge.
Rebate 1st edge with router table
Rotate handle 180 degrees.
Rebate 2nd edge.
Remove handle and screw to other side of work.
Drill out centre using hole cutter.

Make up straight lengths of beading using same 19mm straight cutter in router table.

Cut and assemble into a frame. trim to accurate finish. Knock off edges with radius bit.

Finish with hand tools. Varnish and admire.

Bandsaw, router and table, straight 19mm cutter, 10mm radius semicircular cutter
90mm starrett hole cutter, drill press. Belt sander and 'mouse' sander
A GOOD mitre saw and gauge.

Cuchilo may be able to give you a good quote using that fancy kit but if not PM me I could certainly do something.

Very nice equipment cuchilo!
 

kirielad

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Many thanks for the description - I have a router (with a 'basic' set of bits), but no bandsaw unfortunately.

I have 8 window surrounds to complete, 4 are rectangular with with 90 degree corners, and another 4 are truncated rectangles (basically half rectangles with rounded corners).

After receiving a quote of £1600 to refit just the cabin of my modest craft, (+ materials, + I do all the prep) I will have a go myself.

The portlights are surrounded by elm faced ply, which has suffered due to condensation attacking the edges of the ply from the adjacent windows.

Hence my interest in your closeouts to protect (and finish) the edges of the new facing.

Have sent you a PM.

Thanks again.

Rob
 
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