importing boat from turkey to eu

pmyatt

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Probably the best way is to sail it from Turkey to Cyprus (Southern) - the VAT is lower than Greece. There may, however be the complication of the RCD Certificate, depending on the age of the vessel. Cyprus customs will base the VAT payment on the price paid for the vessel, in euros, at 15%.
 

Tranona

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Suggest your friend contacts the RYA who publish information on importing a boat into the EU. Although it is UK orientated, in principle the rules are EU wide. VAT issues are very clear, but it is likely that getting a CE mark by having the boat comply with the RCD will be the biggest and potentially most expensive problem.

If your friend is a non EU resident he can use the boat in the EU for potentially up to 18 months without paying either VAT or meeting RCD but cannot sell it and must export it afterwards.
 

LadyJessie

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There are three issues you have to deal with in importing a boat (or any other goods) into the EU: type approval, customs duty and VAT.

1. You need an EU type approval. This is described in the 'Recreational Craft Directive' or 'RCD' leading to a 'CE-mark'. This is outside of my area of expertise so you have to research those terms yourself and establish what relevance they have for you. My two pence worth here is: you say that the boat is Canadian which might be a problem if the boat is Canadian built. However, if it is a European built boat with a Canadian flag it might already have a CE-mark, making this a non-issue. Research!

2. Goods imported into the EU are subject to customs duty. However, recently the EU have signed 'customs treaties' with many countries around the world. Turkey is one of those so if your boat is imported from Turkey; the customs duty rate is zero.

3. VAT is a payable on the value of the boat at the time of importation. This is the inescapable part: you have to pay VAT. If you want to import the boat directly after your purchase, the invoice value of your purchase will be the basis of valuation and you will not have any leeway to negotiate. The recommendation above to do that in Cyprus is then your best option. It would cost you more in Greece.

However, you should also consider if there is an opportunity for you to keep the boat in Turkey for one or two years. Then you can claim a lower value upon importation and the value will be much more subject to 'discussion' as there will not be any recent 'purchase value' established. In any case; you will never ever be worse off than your original VAT exposure and very probably very much better off. Money saved......
 

CEproof Spain

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Hello all!

Interesting post! CE compliance of boats can get quite complicated sometimes, especially when people don't know where to turn.

I know its an old post, but I was reading and though we may be able to help somebody in the future. I work for CEproof Spain, an approved boat CE Marking and certification company based in Europe, we inspect and certify all types of recreational craft from 2.5m to 24m for legal use, registration, sale and purchase in Europe by awarding them with the CE Mark once they are found to comply with the essential safety requirements of the Directive.

Lots of free and useful information and advice can be found on our webpage www.ceproof.es, take a look and get informed before buying so you know what is expected. All advice is FREE.

If we can help anyone with this issue please do not hesitate to contact us through our webpage.

Many Thanks
Tim
 

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