Hurley 22

kymmerian

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I am planing to buy a Hurley 22, and I am just going to see one, where the motor is moved outside of the back side of the hull:

1297851884_fopv7431_1c.jpg


Do you think that it will affect the performance of the boat, in the case that the motors of these Hurleys normally stay in a bin behind the tiller.

Thanks in advance :)
 

bob26

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I am planing to buy a Hurley 22, and I am just going to see one, where the motor is moved outside of the back side of the hull:



Do you think that it will affect the performance of the boat, in the case that the motors of these Hurleys normally stay in a bin behind the tiller.

Thanks in advance :)

Why not ask the Hurley Owners Association? They are the ones most likely to know.


http://www.hurleyownersassociation.co.uk/
 

aquaplane

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The Hurley 22 is a good sea boat as I'm sure many will agree. As boats increase in size more priority should be given to making space for an inboard engine. If not an inboard 22' is where I think outboards should be moving from on the stern to a well in the cockpit.

You are getting to a boat that can cope with more severe conditions and if/when the outboard goes t1ts up I would rather be working on it in a well than hangin out the back when the sea has a lop on.

Of course it depends on where you are sailing. On a lake or a sheltered bay an outboard may be fine. A Hurley 22 can do better than that though.
 

Andy Austin

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I am planing to buy a Hurley 22, and I am just going to see one, where the motor is moved outside of the back side of the hull:



Do you think that it will affect the performance of the boat, in the case that the motors of these Hurleys normally stay in a bin behind the tiller.

Thanks in advance :)

Depends how heavy an outboard you envisage. If its heavy enough to alter the trim it might affect performance/balance under sail. On the other hand if you plan to use a lifting bracket it might improve performance over the ob well version as the drag of the ob leg and prop and the turbulence caused by the underwater opening of the well may make a difference. Of course you could lift your ob inboard and seal off the well anyway but that would be quite a performance I should think...and you'd have an engine to stow. But you could at least try that once to see if it does make a difference under sail.
 

Tranona

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The inboard well is common on an H22 but does have its drawbacks, particularly with 2 stroke engines as there is nowhere for the exhaust gases to escape and they can choke the engine giving poor running. However, on a bracket the main disadvantage is that the prop can come out of the water in bouncy conditions.
 

ghostlymoron

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The inboard well is common on an H22 but does have its drawbacks, particularly with 2 stroke engines as there is nowhere for the exhaust gases to escape and they can choke the engine giving poor running. However, on a bracket the main disadvantage is that the prop can come out of the water in bouncy conditions.
I've come across this statement several times relating to o/b engines in a well and can't quite get my head round it. Surely the exhaust goes down the propellor leg and out at depth so it should only cause a problem when you're stationary. I can see that air starvation could be a problem if there is insufficient ventilation to the engine. Could someone explain please.
 

Seajet

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I have a 22' boat with an outboard well; the engine is stowed on any decent trip, and a fairing plug fitted, without this there's a great deal of turbulence and very loud sloshing noise.

Exhaust gasses are only a problem with a light following wind, even then not serious.

I have found a 2-stroke 5hp is optimum ( 4-strokes are too heavy to lift and there are issues with stowage on their side ) , and have happily motored across the Channel in calms Chichester - Guernsey with a 4hp ( with an external tank ).

I wouldn't personally even consider a transom-hung outboard, it's far too likely to pitch out of the water, weight just exactly where a boat hates it for trim, and a distinct hazard to refuel let alone work on, with the risk of losing tools and crew off the back end !

The Hurley 22 is a good boat, but I'd think twice about this particular engine configuration.
 

Slow_boat

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It rather depends what you intend using the engine for. The boat was designed in the days when it was envisaged a motor on a sailing boat would be used to get on an off a swingning mooring or anchoring and not much else. Nowadays, the habit is to motor if the speed falls below a certain limit as opposed to simply going somewhere else and many see marina hopping as the perfect cruise.

An 'outboard' outboard can easily come out of the water in a seaway and in a marina must be used to steer because it is behind the rudder.

Brilliant seaboat, BTW. Watch for deck compression under the mast as there is no direct mast support.
 

Bav34

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The inboard well is common on an H22 but does have its drawbacks, particularly with 2 stroke engines as there is nowhere for the exhaust gases to escape and they can choke the engine giving poor running. However, on a bracket the main disadvantage is that the prop can come out of the water in bouncy conditions.

Totally agree. We had one for 5 years and the fumes in the cockpit were often unbearable, however the Hurley is a great little boat. Sailed quite regularly from The Solent to the West country with no sea-keeping concerns.
 

Tranona

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I've come across this statement several times relating to o/b engines in a well and can't quite get my head round it. Surely the exhaust goes down the propellor leg and out at depth so it should only cause a problem when you're stationary. I can see that air starvation could be a problem if there is insufficient ventilation to the engine. Could someone explain please.

Depends on the engine to an extent. Some exhaust thru the prop hub and some thru an outlet above the prop. Because the prop is only just immersed and the bottom of the boat is just behind the exhaust outlet the gases tend to swirl up around the leg. Many 2 strokes also have an exhaust relief port above the waterline to relieve back pressure and these gases can only go upwards.
 

bobgoode

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With an engine mounted in the lazarette you will experience issues with exhaust gases building up and the revs fallinig away. Easily fixed by manufacturing a bracket with a pipe to route the gases below the water line. Tap the braket into the leg of the engine with care though!
The usual way to sort the problem is mount the engine on the transom and this will only be an issue in nasty swell where the prop may cavitate.

Check the bulkhead and deck around the mast for compression problems.

Sound boats and great fun...actually miss my old one.

Google Nick Vass....writes for PBO as their surveyor. Great guy and knows much about Hurleys as he was in the early days of the owners association.
 

TSB240

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Leg vent

We have a 2 stroke outboard in the well of a 25 foot trailable yacht. There is no problem with exhuast gases in the cockpit except as mentioned in a light following wind.

Most outboards exhaust mainly through the prop or down the leg. On long shaft outboards there is quite a back pressure and this can result in larger amounts of exhaust coming out at the breather at the top of the leg.

Our old outboard had been modified so that this vent was connected to a heat resistant flexible pipe. This in our case was routed through the Transom meaning virtually no gases in the cockpit.

Operating an outboard without remotes off the transom is a nightmare. In strong tidal and short chop conditions you are going to have an outboard over reving and with no cooling every time the prop comes out of the water.

Only time we have one on the back is for storage on the Pushpit with a plug in the well giving us at least another knot through the water under sail. That extra knot makes a big difference on longer legs.
 

Pleiades

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Had a Hurley 22 for 10 years and cruised all over the Western approaches in her. A great little vessel. It was one of the latest ones -a Ravensail built one. She had a Yanmar 1 GM diesel inboard which was excellent but I also had a Seagull Silver Century Plus longshaft on a swing down bracket bolted to the transom. Also carried a 6 man liferaft and a Seagull dingy motor and an Avon on top of the stern locker. With 3900lbs displacement and 60 % ballast ratio the weight of the outboard on the stern bracket made no difference at all as far I as could tell. If you want to race round cans I suppose you might notice but with cruising compliment of beer and biscuits aboard the outboard on the transom is not significant. Some friends did however sail Hurley 22s with the outboard in a well arrangement which by their own accounts was a rubbish arrangement due to the engine suffocating. They a had to run with the locker lid open which was no use at all in heavy breaking seas. The outboard in a well arrangement leaves the prop permanently in the water which is not ideal - I have seen various ways round this including mounting a higher board which the engine sits up on when not in use. So in short - find one with the inboard diesel - makes for a far more seaworthy vessel and gives you much greater range than an outboard for serious cruising.
Good hunting.


Robin
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