How do i rig my boat

Crinan12

Active member
Joined
6 Mar 2019
Messages
550
Visit site
Hi folks we will be putting our boat in the water in a few weeks. When the boatyard puts the mast on the boat and attaches all the wire rigging will we have to do anything else (in terms of the standing rigging) or will it be ready to sail ? Someone said to me I would have to adjust the rigging myself. I was just wondering what the norm is.

If I do have to do anything is it a simple procedure and how would I find out how to do it?

Sorry but this is all new to me and I'm totally clueless about how this all works

I'll ask the boatyard (Crinan) when I'm next up but was keen to know roughly what's expected

Thanks in advance
Douglas
 

e014945

New member
Joined
12 Feb 2012
Messages
20
Visit site
Hi Douglas,

from my own experience it is always better to have a double check before the crane leave, if you can. Otherwise take it easy during the first sail and do some checks with the sails up on both tacks. the idea is not to have the rigging too loose on the downwind side.

And also check that the mast is straight.

Gary
 

STOL71

Member
Joined
17 Sep 2014
Messages
334
Location
London
www.shuda-sailing.com
Yes, you tune the rigging after you've launched as the hull flexes out when the boat is in the water.
Employing a rigger to do the tuning is money well spent if you don't know how to do it.
 

Crinan12

Active member
Joined
6 Mar 2019
Messages
550
Visit site
Thanks guys
Is it a skill that can be learnt fairly easily or is it a job for the pros? If it's something that has to be do every year it sounds like a useful thing to learn
Or do most folk just employ a rigger?
Thanks
 

lpdsn

New member
Joined
3 Apr 2009
Messages
5,467
Visit site
My experience is that yards or riggers will just step a mast and set up the rigging so it doesn't fall down. You have to tune it yourself if you want decent sailing performance.

You'd be better off bribing the crew of a successful local racer with beer than employing a rigger.
 

dunedin

Well-known member
Joined
3 Feb 2004
Messages
12,980
Location
Boat (over winters in) the Clyde
Visit site
As lpdsn says, generally the yard will just do enough attachment and tightening of the rigging wires to stop the mast falling down with no sails set.
Quite a bit more to do to finalise the mast “standing” rigging - then fit boom, sails, running rigging etc.

If never done this before I would strongly recommend asking the yard to assist you setting it up the first time, but insist they do it whilst you are there to learn. Make lots of notes, take masses of photos and ask any questions.
Then next year could possibly do yourself but get them to check. Thereafter could be DIY.

At Crinan not many passing racers to bribe, but perhaps a helpful local may be an alternative to the boatyard. But paying the yard for the first time seems a reasonable investment. A broken rig due to missing a key step would be expensive.
 

lpdsn

New member
Joined
3 Apr 2009
Messages
5,467
Visit site
From what I understand Quandry has a lot of racing experience and is based in Crinan. Of course, he may be completely teetotal...
 

Crinan12

Active member
Joined
6 Mar 2019
Messages
550
Visit site
Excuse the ignorance but why are people mentioning racers? Do they have to be expert in tuning rigging ?
Thanks
 

William_H

Well-known member
Joined
28 Jul 2003
Messages
13,789
Location
West Australia
Visit site
After the mast is put up or perhaps before make sure the halyards are all clear and tied off at the bottom so you can reach them and use them. Sheaves are OK. Don't forget wind pointer. radio antenna and lights.
Regarding rigging you are aiming to get the mast supported by fairly firm rigging tension for the cap shrouds and back stay. You then tighten up the intermediate stays to get the mast straight in the fore and aft and sideways bend. Hopefully the mast rake will be set by the length of the forestay and will be OK. Usually just perceptibly raked aft.
After your first sail check the rigging again as it does stretch. IMHO rigging can not be so tight that you do not get slack sidestays when hard on the wind. Simply the hull will not be stiff enough and will distort enough to leave lee shrouds slack. ol'will
 

Crinan12

Active member
Joined
6 Mar 2019
Messages
550
Visit site
Hi folks
Just watched a you tube video where a chap uses a 'loos tensioner tool' to set his rigging
Pops it on the rigging, it gives a reading and he tightens/loosens accordingly

Looks very simple. Is there a lot more to it than this though? I feel there will be! The tool is about £100. Seems a bargain if it enables me to tune my own rigging

Thanks
 

VicS

Well-known member
Joined
13 Jul 2002
Messages
48,359
Visit site
Hi folks
Just watched a you tube video where a chap uses a 'loos tensioner tool' to set his rigging
Pops it on the rigging, it gives a reading and he tightens/loosens accordingly

Looks very simple. Is there a lot more to it than this though? I feel there will be! The tool is about £100. Seems a bargain if it enables me to tune my own rigging

Thanks

Beg, borrow or steal a tension guage if you have a "performnce" / hot racing machine otherwise there is no need to spend shed loads of cash on one. Instead read the Selden guide, to which the link has been given above and use the rough guide or the "stretch over 2m" / "folding rule" method described therein.

You dont say what boat you have, or describe the rig, so no one can give you any specific advice
 

langstonelayabout

Well-known member
Joined
1 Jul 2012
Messages
1,745
Location
Portsmouth, UK
Visit site
As lpdsn says, generally the yard will just do enough attachment and tightening of the rigging wires to stop the mast falling down with no sails set.
Quite a bit more to do to finalise the mast “standing” rigging - then fit boom, sails, running rigging etc.

At Northeney Marina (Hayling Island) they used to refuse to raise your mast unless you had an experienced rigger on board (one that they recognised, that is).

They always cited safety as their prime motive for this but it also seemed to sell the services of their resident rigger too. I'm sure you'll understand.

To be fair, if you are still lacking confidence in your abilities to rig your own boat I'd recommend that you do spend a few hours on a rigger. He/she will ensure your mast & rigging is good for the forthcoming year, is lofted and the stays secured correctly, the running rigging put into the right cleats and that your rigging is safe for use. You will also need to watch him and what he does so that you can do it next time.

Don't scrimp on the split pins either. Your rig depends on them...
 

Crinan12

Active member
Joined
6 Mar 2019
Messages
550
Visit site
Thanks folks that gives me somewhere to start !

Vic it's a seamaster 925 - 28ft yacht. I'm not sure how to describe the right to be totally honest!It's got a roller furling jib. I think it's called a sloop rig? I told you I was new to this...... :)
 

Quandary

Well-known member
Joined
20 Mar 2008
Messages
8,207
Location
Argyll
Visit site
Racing does tend to give you experience and knowledge as with some one design boats you can adjust mast rake for different conditions from day to day. I think I still know a bit about setting up a rig still doing it every year, though I am mainly self taught, we did have a professional rigger in our crew for a time. I would be willing to come and give you some advice if that is that you want and I can bring a bosuns chair if the rig is discontinuous or the spreader angles need to be set and fixed. While most of the set up can be done once the mast is up, the final stage involves tensioning when under sail in medium wind but that is fairly straightforward and something that you can easily do yourself later. I do not use a rig tensioner, preferring to do it by feel and measurement. However you did not say what type of boat or rig it is, that can make a difference.

Pm me with details if you want me to help.
 

johnalison

Well-known member
Joined
14 Feb 2007
Messages
39,799
Location
Essex
Visit site
My experience has been that yards will tension the rigging suffiently to keep the mast up but not well enough for sailing.

What you do will depend on how sophisticated the boat is. For a simple rig, say that of a Centaur, following the usual rules and getting the rig decently tight and straight may be all that is needed. For a more complex rig, as on modern boats of 30ft+, the rig needs to be properly set up. A rigger can do this in a fraction of the time that you can, but it could be an extravagance for many cruisers. If your boat is that complex it could be better to learn about mast tuning and do it yourself. Engaging the help of a knowledgable friend could be one way of starting.
 

Stemar

Well-known member
Joined
12 Sep 2001
Messages
23,111
Location
Home - Southampton, Boat - Gosport
Visit site
Hi folks
Just watched a you tube video where a chap uses a 'loos tensioner tool' to set his rigging
Pops it on the rigging, it gives a reading and he tightens/loosens accordingly

Looks very simple. Is there a lot more to it than this though? I feel there will be! The tool is about £100. Seems a bargain if it enables me to tune my own rigging

Thanks

I have one and it's excellent. They come on different sizes to cover a wide range of rigging sizes, so make sure you get the right one. I'd still get your friendly local rigger to tune the rig for you the first time, while you drive him mad with questions. If he's still friendly after that, he'll show you how to use the gauge

Which reminds me of a price list allegedly seen in a New Zealand boatyard:

Labour Charge
Owner absent :$10 per hour
Owner present: $15 per hour
Owner helping: $20 per hour
 
Top